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Publication numberUS2277516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date24 Mar 1942
Filing date20 Jan 1939
Priority date20 Jan 1938
Also published asUS2367277
Publication numberUS 2277516 A, US 2277516A, US-A-2277516, US2277516 A, US2277516A
InventorsPierre Henroteau Francois Char
Original AssigneePierre Henroteau Francois Char
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for frequency changing
US 2277516 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1942. F. c. P. HENROTEAU METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FREQUENCY CHANGING Filed Jan. 20, 1959 TRANSMITTER RANSM ITTER TRANSMTTE R TRANSMVTTER RANSMITTER TRANSMTT ER RANSMTTTER Patented Mar. 24, 1942 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FREQUENCY CHANG ING Francois Charles Pierre Henroteau, Liege, Belgium Application January 20, 1939, Serial No. 252,030 In Belgium January 20, 1938 12 Claims.

This invention relates to a method of frequency changing and to apparatus adapted for the carrying out of such method.

The method of the invention comprises modulating an electron releasing beam in accordance with a signal, causing the modulated beam to scan a surface capable of electron emission, projecting the electrons emitted from such surface on a mosaic capable of electron emission and scanning the mosaic at a speed different from that at which the surface was scanned.

The term mosaic" meaning here and elsewhere in this specification a multitude of mutually insulated tiny conducting elements, as used in many systems of television; and scannin as likewise used herein is intended to mean that electrons from a single source are directed at a number of different points on some other element successively.

When the mosaic is scanned at a higher speed than that at which the surface was scanned, the method may be used to permit the transmission of a number of contemporaneous messages (this term to be understood in a general sense as including any intelligence or any portion of any intelligence, such as sound or pictures or writing, which may be represented by electrical vibrations) through a single transmission channel by condensing them in duration during transmission. For this purpose, each of a number of electron releasing beams is modulated in accordance with a different message, the modulated beams are caused to scan simultaneously different areas of the surface capable of electron emission, the electrons emitted from each diflerent area of such surface are projected on a different area of the mosaic, and the whole of the latter is scanned in a time at the most equal to the time occupied in the scanning of an area of the surface capable of electron emission. When, on the other hand, the mosaic is scanned at a lower speed than that at which the surface was scanned, then the method may be used for transmitting messages by wireless in such a way as to render possible the reduction of static noises in the reproduction of such messages at a receiver. In this case, one electron beam is modulated in accordance with the message to be transmitted and is caused to scan the whole of the surface capable of electron emission, while different equal sized areas of the mosaic are scanned simultaneously at a sub-multiple of the speed of scanning of the surface at the most equal to the number of such areas, and the signals resulting from the scanning of each such area are collected.

Apparatus according to the invention comprises an envelope containing a member capable of electron emission and a mosaic also capable of electron emission, means for causing each of a number of different areas of one of the elements (i. e., the member or the mosaic) contained in the cell to be scanned by a different electron releasing beam, and means for causing the whole of the other such element to be scanned by one electron releasing beam.

The apparatus may be constructed with the member capable of electron emission and the mosaic spaced apart, with the surfaces thereof which are scanned facing each other. In this case it is desirable to provide an accelerating anode between the member and the mosaic and an electronic lens, for example, a condensing coil surrounding the anode, to focus on the mosaic electrons emitted from the member capable of electron emission. 0n the other hand, the latter member may be disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic, preferably in the form of a grid the bars of which extend in the direction in which scanning is effected, the electron releasing beam or beams intended for the scanning of the grid being arranged to strike it at such an angle that no such beam can strike the mosaic.

The invention will be more fully described in connection with the attached drawing in which Figure 1 shows one form of the invention with the mosaic adapted to be scanned by one electron releasing beam,

Figure 2 shows the same form with the mosaic adapted to be scanned by a number of such beams,

Figure 3 shows a different form of the invention with the mosaic adapted to be scanned by a number of electron beams, and

Figure 4 is an enlarged detailed cross section of a part of the construction shown in Figure 3.

In the form of construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the apparatus comprises an envelope l containing a plate 2 capable of electron emission and a mosaic 3 also capable of electron emission and mounted on an insulating plate 4 backed by a conducting signal plate 5 connected to a transmitter. Associated with the plate 2 are a number of conventionally indicated electron guns 1 each mounted in a separate pocket 6 formed in the end of the cell nearest to the plate. Cooperating with each gun is a modulating electrode l0 and the usual pairs of deflecting plates l I and I2. At the opposite end of the envelope associated with the mosaic 3 is an electron gun l3 with which cooperate pairs of deflecting plates 8 and 9. Between the member 2 and the mosaic 3 and surrounding the path of electrons passing from one of these elements to the other is an accelerating anode it inside the cell. Surrounding this anode on the outside 01 the envelope is an electronic lens in the form of a condensing coil I5 acting to focus on the mosaic 3 electrons emitted from the plate 2.

The construction of Fig. 2 is substantially the reverse of that of Fig. 1. In Fig. 2 one electron gun 1a, with which cooperates a modulating electrode Illa is associated with the plate 2, while a number of electron guns l3a are associated with the mosaic 3. The mosaic 3 instead of being backed by a single signal plate is backed by a number of signal plates l6, each of which is behind an area of the mosaic adapted to be scanned by one electron releasing beam and each of which is connected to a separate transmitter.

In the operation of the apparatus of Fig. -1 for the purpose of enabling the transmission of a number of contemporaneous messages through a single transmission channel, each modulating electrode I0 is supplied with electrical oscillations corresponding to a different message so that the beam produced by each gun I is modulated in accordance with a different message. The deflecting potentials applied to the difierent pairs of plates II and I2 are such as to cause each beam to scan an area of the plate 2 extending over the full width of the plate but only over a fraction of its height, as is clear from the dotted lines in the drawing. The deflecting plates l2 may in fact be omitted if desired, in which case each beam scans the plate only along a horizontal line, the thickness of which is determined by the cross section of the beam.

When a beam strikes the plate 2 it causes an emission of electrons proportional to its intensity at that moment, this emission being helped if desired by connection of the plate 2 to any appropriate source of potential. The emitted electrons are drawn by the anode it towards the mosaic 3 and focused on it by the concentrating coil [5. In this way, series of electrostatic charges representing different messages are produced on different areas of the mosaic 3 corresponding respectively to areas of the member 2 scanned by different beams. The whole mosaic and thus these areas in succession are scanned, in a time at the most equal to that occupied in the scanning of one area of the plate 2, electron releasing beam produced by the electron gun l3, and a series of corresponding signals is thus sent to the transmitter in the manner well known. Thus, in the example illustrated, scanning of the mosaic is effected five times as fast as scanning on the plate 2. Obviously, the signals transmitted in one scanning period will generally represent only a small fraction of, say, the full conversations constituting the messages applied to the electrodes H].

In the operation of the apparatus of Fig. 2 in the transmission of messages by wireless in such a way as to render possible the reduction of static noises in the reproduction of these messages at a receiver, the electrode Illa is supplied with oscillations corresponding to the message to be transmitted and the beam from the gun 1a is thus modulated accordingly. beam is caused to scan the whole of the plate 2, and electrons emitted from this plate are, as in Fig. 1, caused to strike the mosaic 3 at positions corresponding to those from which they were emitted from the plate. Different areas of the The modulated.

- Illa during one scanning; of the plate l0 are transmitted in a time equwf to" the actual duration of the whole of that message, so that their frequency is correspondingly reduced.

Reception of a number of contemporaneous messages sent through the same transmission channel with apparatus of Fig. 1, is effected with the apparatus of Fig. 2. The incoming signal, carrying in succession fragments of different messages, is applied to the modulating electrode 10a, and the signal plates iii are connected to receivers for the several individual messages.

Reception of a message transmitted with the help of the apparatus of Fig. 2, is efiected with the apparatus of Fig. l. The incoming signals, each carrying low frequency fragments of the message are applied to the control electrodes l0, and the message is reconstituted at its original frequency by the rapid scanning of the mosaic 3.

When the apparatus of Fig. 1 or Fig. 2 is used for transmission and that of the other figure for reception, the number of signal plates l6 and elec tron guns I3a must, of course, correspond to the number of electron guns I, and the scanning by the plates II and I2 must be synchronized with that by the plates 8a and 9a, while that by the plates 8 and 9 must be synchronized with that by plates Ha and In.

In Figures 3 and 4 a modification of the apparatus of the invention is illustrated. In this modification the member capable of electron emission is disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic 3 rather than some distance away from and facing it as in Figs. 1 and 2. Instead of being in the form of a plate, the member is in the form of a grid I1, the bars l8 of which extend substantially parallel to the lines along which it is scanned (i. e. horizontally as shown in Fig. 3). The electron gun 1a is in such a position and directs its beam at such an angle that as shown in Fig. 4, the beam effectively scans the grid, but the latter forms ascreen to prevent the beam from striking the mosaic 3. The electron guns l3a of which there may, of course, be more than the three shown, instead of being disposed at an angle to the mosaic as in Fig. 2 are arranged in the side of the envelope opposite to it so that the beams which they produce can reach the mosaic directly between the bars of the grid. An electrode l9 may be used in certain circumstances to aid in controlling the'movements of the electrons emitted by the electron releasing beams.

The operation of the device shown in Figs. 3 and 4 is basically the same as that of the devices of Figs. 1 and 2. Electrons emitted from the grid I! under the influence of the electron releasing beam from the electron gun 1a are attracted to the closely adjacent mosaic. Different areas of the latter are scanned by beams from different electron guns l3a, and the electrons thus emitted are collected by the electrode is.

Although a device of the kind shown in Fig. 3 but with one electron gun associated with the mosaic and a number of electron guns associated with the grid has not been shown, it will be obvious that one of this kind could easily be constructed.

signal plate l6- In all cases the scanning of the plate 2 or grid 11, as the case may be, and of the mosaic 3 may be continuous. However, it may be in some cases found desirable to scan these elements alternately. In this case two identical devices could be connected somewhat in the manner shown in my copending application, Serial No. 189,688, filed Feb. 9, 1938. Such an arrangement might be particularly desirable in the case of the device shown in Fig. 3, since if scanning of the two elements were efiected alternately, the potential of the electrode l 9 could be made more positive during scanning of the mosaic than during scanning of the grid. Without this, there might be some distortion in the use of the device as a result of electrons emitted from one element of the mosaic returning to another instead of going to the electrode I9, the potential of which could not be made too positive without attracting to it electrons emitted from the grid which should have gone to the mosaic.

The invention is not intended to be limited to the devices specifically described and illustrated, since they could be modified in many ways.' For instance, both the plate or grid and the elements of the mosaic might have coatings of photoelectric material, and light beams be used instead of electron beams. Again the areas of the plate 2 or the grid scanned by beams from the electron guns I need not all be of equal size. For example, if the apparatus were used for the transmission of pictures and sound over the same circuit in television, the area covered by the beam modulated by picture currents might be, say, ten or more times that covered by the sound current modulated beam. The result of this would simply be that the frequency of transmission of the picture currents would be negligibly increased while that of the transmission of the sound currents would be very greatly increased.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. Apparatus for use in the electrical transmission of messages comprising an envelope containing two physically separate elements, namely a member capable of electron emission and a mosaic also capable of electron emission, means for causing each of a number of different areas of one of said elements to be scanned by a different electron releasing beam, means for causing the whole of the other of said elements to be scanned by one electron releasing beam, and means for collecting on the mosaic the electrons emitted from the member capable of electron emission under the influence of the scanning.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the element the whole of which is scanned by one electron releasing beam is the member capable of electron emission.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the element the whole of which is scanned by one electron releasing beam is the mosaic.

4. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the element the whole of which is scanned by one electron releasing beam is the member capable of electron emission, and comprising a conducting signal plate for each area of the mosaic scanned by a separate electron releasing beam arranged in close capacitative relation to such comprise an accelerating anode and an electronic lens between said member and said mosaic.

7. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the member capable of electron emission and the mosaic are spaced apart and the surfaces thereof which are scanned face each other, and the means for collecting electrons on the mosaic comprise a condensing coil acting as an electronic lens between said member and said mosaic.

8. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the member capable of electron emission is disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic.

9. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the member capable of electron emission is in the form of a grid, and is disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic.

10. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the member capable of electron emission is in the form of a grid, the bars of which extend in the direction in which scanning is effected, and is disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic.

11. Apparatus according to claim 1, in which the member capable of electron emission is in the form of a grid, the bars of which extend in the direction in which scanning is effected, and is disposed immediately adjacent to the mosaic on the side thereof which is scanned, and in which the grid is scanned at such an angle that no electron releasing beam scanning it can strike the mosaic.

12. Apparatus for use in the electrical transmission of messages comprising an envelope containing a mosaic capable of electron emission, means for causing each of a number of different areas of said mosaic to be scanned by a different beam of electrons, and means for causing the whole of said mosaic to be scanned by one beam of electrons having a speed substantially difierent from the speed of the electrons of the first mentioned beams.

PIERRE

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2416914 *30 Jul 19434 Mar 1947Rca CorpElectron discharge device
US2434698 *15 Feb 194420 Jan 1948Homrighous John HTime division multiplex telephone system
US2451632 *24 Feb 194419 Oct 1948Bell Telephone Labor IncControl voltage means in pulse receiver
US2459131 *24 Sep 194611 Jan 1949Rca CorpElectronic distributor for multiplex pulse communication systems
US2472889 *17 Dec 194614 Jun 1949Du Mont Allen B Lab IncPhotovision
US2499534 *28 Dec 19467 Mar 1950the transmission of message IntelligenceA sorber
US2499844 *16 Jan 19477 Mar 1950Philco CorpReceiver for pulse-position-modulation systems
US2510070 *18 May 19456 Jun 1950Farnsworth Res CorpTelevision scanning system
US2517265 *18 Jul 19471 Aug 1950George WaldMultichannel television system
US2532719 *16 Oct 19445 Dec 1950John H HomrighousDimensional radio communication system
US2559661 *2 Apr 194710 Jul 1951Int Standard Electric CorpMultichannel electrical pulse communication system
US2580685 *30 Dec 19491 Jan 1952Bell Telephone Labor IncColor television with reduced band width
US2588380 *3 Aug 194511 Mar 1952Cargill Jr William WMethod and apparatus for transmitting intelligence by radio waves
US2608617 *14 Jun 195026 Aug 1952Bell Telephone Labor IncTelevision converter system
US2612634 *19 Oct 194430 Sep 1952Rca CorpAngular modulation
US2719879 *16 Feb 19514 Oct 1955Telefonbau & Normalzeit GmbhTelecommunication device
US2900445 *26 Jan 195218 Aug 1959Westinghouse Electric CorpIncrease of image contrast with television pickup tube
US2907818 *23 Jul 19516 Oct 1959Minnesota Mining & MfgMagnetic recording of television signals
US2948779 *16 Dec 19439 Aug 1960Herman Elvin EScrambling system
US3180932 *19 Feb 196327 Apr 1965Gen Precision IncEqual-area simultaneous display of remotely located television cameras' signals on a single monitor screen and synchronization of same
DE940656C *21 Feb 195022 Mar 1956TelefonbauEinrichtung zur UEbertragung mehrerer gleichzeitiger Nachrichten ueber einen Kanal
DE1033272B *12 Feb 19533 Jul 1958Deutsche BundespostVerfahren zum Veraendern der Frequenz von elektrischen Schwingungen der Nachrichtentechnik
Classifications
U.S. Classification313/394, 315/13.1, 332/137, 348/385.1, 348/441, 315/8.61
International ClassificationH04J3/18, H01J31/64, H01J31/08, H04B1/66
Cooperative ClassificationH04J3/18, H04B1/662, H01J31/64
European ClassificationH04J3/18, H01J31/64, H04B1/66B