Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberWO2003098175 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberPCT/CA2003/000746
Publication date27 Nov 2003
Filing date21 May 2003
Priority date21 May 2002
Also published asCA2387106A1
Publication numberPCT/2003/746, PCT/CA/2003/000746, PCT/CA/2003/00746, PCT/CA/3/000746, PCT/CA/3/00746, PCT/CA2003/000746, PCT/CA2003/00746, PCT/CA2003000746, PCT/CA200300746, PCT/CA3/000746, PCT/CA3/00746, PCT/CA3000746, PCT/CA300746, WO 03098175 A1, WO 03098175A1, WO 2003/098175 A1, WO 2003098175 A1, WO 2003098175A1, WO-A1-03098175, WO-A1-2003098175, WO03098175 A1, WO03098175A1, WO2003/098175A1, WO2003098175 A1, WO2003098175A1
InventorsMichael Petersen, Allan Wilson, Mykola Sherstyuk
ApplicantIntelligent Devices Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: Patentscope, Espacenet
Method for measuring temperature using a remote, passive, calibrated rf/rfid tag including a method for calibration
WO 2003098175 A1
Abstract
A system for tracking environmental parameters, such as temperature, associated with a package during transportation and storage thereof, comprises a passive RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag adapted for containment within the package and at least an RFID reader adapted to communicate with such passive RFID tag. The tag includes means for sensing an environmental parameter, such as temperature, means for storing information respecting such parameter, and means for transmitting such information upon activation by such reader. The reader includes means for activating such tag, means for receiving and storing information received from such tag, and means for making such received information available to an interested party. The system may also include a master tag for external association with the package, the master tag prompting the slave tag to transmit data at specific intervals. If the sensed parameter is temperature the slave tag may utilize a tick oscillator, the transmission frequency of which changes in response to temperature changes, the master tag then determining the temperature on the basis of the frequency change.
Claims  (OCR text may contain errors)
CLAIMS:
1. A system for tracking environmental parameters associated with a package during transportation and storage thereof, comprising a passive RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag adapted for containment within the package and an RFID reader adapted to communicate with such passive RFID tag, such tag including means for sensing an environmental parameter, means for storing information respecting such parameter, and means for transmitting such information upon activation by such reader, such reader including means for activating such tag, means for receiving and storing information received from such tag, and means for making such received information available to an interested party.
2. A system for tracking temperature differentials associated with a package during transportation and storage thereof, comprising a passive RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag adapted for containment within the package and an RFID reader adapted to communicate with such passive RFID tag, such tag including means for sensing temperature, means for storing temperature data and means for transmitting such data upon activation by such reader, such reader including means for activating such tag, means for receiving and storing temperature data received from such tag, and means for making such received temperature data available to an interested party.
3. A system for tracking temperature differentials associated with a package during transportation and storage thereof, comprising a slave RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tag adapted for containment within the package, a master RFID tag adapted for external association with such package, and an RFID reader adapted to communicate with such master RFID tag, such slave RFID tag including temperature sensitive oscillator means and antenna means, such master RFID tag including power means, antenna means, timing means and memory means, and such RFID reader including transceiver means for communicating with such master tag, means for storing temperature data received from such master tag, and means for making such received temperature data available to an interested party.
4. The system of claim 3 wherein said oscillator means in such slave tag is a tick oscillator whose frequency will shift predictably in accordance with changes in temperature, a change in frequency from a stable known frequency associated with a known temperature being indicative of a temperature change from said known temperature.
5. The system of claim 4 wherein such slave tag includes procedure memory means programmed with calibration and identification data.
6. The system of claim 4 wherein said master tag includes integrated circuit means, procedure memory, high-stability oscillator means and data memory, said timing means of said master tag causing said master tag to activate said slave tag at predetermined intervals, to receive a signal from said tick oscillator, to analyse the frequency associated with such signal, and to determine a temperature based on the frequency change from said stable frequency.
7. The system of claim 6 wherein each slave tag is paired with a specific master tag, with such tags having been calibrated together.
8. The system of claim 6 wherein a plurality of slave tags are calibrated together with a plurality of master tags whereby any such master tag of such plurality of master tags will be operable with any such slave tag of such plurality of slave tags.
9. The system of any one of claims 3 to 8 wherein such RFID reader is also capable of writing programming instructions to a master RFID tag whereby such master tag can be used in different situations.
10. The system of any one of claims 3 to 9 wherein the slave tag is disposable after one or more uses.
11. A method of calibrating slave tags for use in a system according to claim 5 or claim 6 comprising the steps of: inserting a slave tag into a temperature insulated chamber containing a thermoelectric element, rapidly and precisely altering the temperature within said chamber, calculating a specific temperature-frequency relationship for said tag in accordance with the expression:
Penc = Tfζtemp) where Penc = period of Manchester encoder pulses; Tf = sigmoid type function; temp = temperature and storing the specific function determined for such slave tag in the procedure memory of such tag.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein each slave tag is paired with a specific master tag and the specific temperature-frequency function of the slave tag is stored in the procedure memory of the master tag with which it is paired.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

METHOD FOR MEASURING TEMPERATURE USING A REMOTE, PASSIVE, CALIBRATED RF/RFID TAG INCLUDING A METHOD FOR

CALIBRATION

The present invention relates to a system that includes a passive, remote radio frequency identification (RFID) tag, and a control device, such as an active smart RFID tag or RFID reader/writer that can communicate with the passive tag giving it energy and receiving data from it and that can analyze and store data so received. In the case of this control device being an active smart RFID tag, the system would further require a reader/writer that can instruct the active RFID tag and can read data created during use of the tags. The system will be utilized primarily in the transport and storage field, or any other field of use where detecting changes in temperature at distance without the use of a direct probe is desirable. The system utilizes a unique means for determining temperature, which means forms part of this patent application. This invention further claims a methodology of calibration to provide accurate temperature measurements (in the range of +/- 0.1 degree C).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Devices to measure temperature in transported or stored goods are widely known. Inexpensive temperature sensing devices are generally designed to record only a single excursion outside a preset temperature window. More expensive temperature logging devices are typically bulkier and too costly for single use or disposable applications. A further limitation of prior art is the requirement to retrieve a tag from a shipping box to take a reading or download data from it.

There are many instances where it is desirable to determine and record the temperature at many points during the transportation or storage of a product or load. Electronic sensing and recording devices that can do this are available; they include thermistors or other temperature sensors, a clock, a battery, a memory in which temperature data are recorded, and some form of output mechanism (such as a plug-in port) whereby the recorded data can be read for interpretation by an interested party at a later time. These devices are large in size compared to the disposable tags, and significantly more expensive. They are generally reusable. In some cases, for example where the container's size is small relative to the size of the sensing and recording device or extreme temperatures that would affect battery performance are of interest, they require probes containing a temperature sensor that destroys the integrity of the container. Where the container is large enough to accommodate a sensing and recording device, the device must be removed from the container when it reaches its destination to allow it to be reused.

Passive RFID tags are in wide use for identifying and tracking all manner of packages and items. RFID technology uses electromagnetic or electrostatic coupling in the radio frequency (RF) range of the electromagnetic spectrum to identify uniquely an object of interest. RFID is increasingly supplementing or replacing bar coding for identification purposes and providing electronic packing slip functions in the shipping and logistics industry as it does not require direct contact or line-of-sight scanning.

A passive RFID system comprises an antenna and transceiver (usually combined as a reader) and a transponder (RFID tag). The antenna generates a RF signal that activates the RFID tag. The activated tag then transmits data back to the antenna. The data may be used to notify a logic controller to initiate an action, or stored for subsequent retrieval by an interested party.

In response to the size and cost issues, Petersen and Wilson have described in Canadian Patent Application No. 2,383,049 of April 23, 2002 an active or smart RFID Tag system for monitoring and recording environmental conditions including temperature, that is small in size, relatively inexpensive, and can transmit its data to a reader via wireless means. However it is sufficiently expensive in its manufacture that it could be uneconomical as a single use or disposable device for most applications, necessitating its removal from the container or package at its destination, for the purpose of later re-use. A further limitation is the adverse effect of decreasing temperature on the battery, making the device impractical for very cold applications (such as monitoring dry-ice packaged goods) without the addition of a temperature probe containing a thermistor, which destroys the integrity of the package, or the use of expensive low temperature battery technology.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention combines a low cost passive RFID tag (slave tag) with an active RFID master tag and an RF writer/reader in a system that senses and records temperature at preprogrammed intervals. The low cost of the slave tag makes it feasible to be used as a disposable temperature sensor.

A further implementation of this invention combines a low cost passive RFID tag (slave tag) with an RF writer/reader in a recording system, omitting the master tag.

The slave tag is inserted in a package or container whose internal temperature is of interest. The master tag polls the slave tag at preprogrammed intervals via RF signal, and the slave tag transmits data (such as its unique ID and/or manufacturer code) back to the master tag by RF signal. The master tag can then determine the temperature of the environment into which the slave tag has been inserted by way of calculating the frequency shift caused by such ambient temperature from its nominal calibrated frequency (see below for method of calibration). DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The master RFID tag comprises an integrated circuit with programmable or re-programmable procedure memory, battery, antenna, clock, high-stability oscillator such as piezo-electric, quartz or ceramic resonator, and volatile or non-volatile data memory. The master tag can be pre-programmed at the time of manufacture or can be programmed prior to use using the RF writer/reader. At programmed intervals, the temperature data calculated from the frequency shift during data transmission sessions by the slave tag are stored in the master tag's data memory- The stored temperature data can be downloaded via RF writer/reader by someone interested in the temperature to which the container contents have been exposed.

The slave tag comprises a procedure memory programmed with calibration data (if required, as described below), optional data such as ID, manufacturer codes, electronic packing slip information etc., Manchester-type phase encoder, oscillator whose frequency is temperature sensitive such as a tick oscillator, and a resonator such as an antenna coil, printed antenna, ceramic antenna, etc.

In a further aspect of the system, the temperature sensitive oscillator of the slave tag replaces a thermistor or other direct temperature sensing device as the means of determining the temperature, eliminating the need for a battery in the slave tag. This reduces the cost of manufacturing the slave tag and eliminates the problem of a battery's voltage being temperature sensitive. In principle, any ISO standard RFID tag can be used for this function, adding little or no additional cost to logistic systems already utilizing such RFID tags to track shipments.

In this system, temperature is measured by comparing the stable oscillator frequency of the master tag to the frequency of the slave tag's tick oscillator, a semi-conductor device whose frequency is predictably dependent on temperature. The master tag's antenna is calibrated to receive signals in the frequency range of interest, determined by the range of temperature to which the slave tag might be exposed and the range of frequencies that would result from such temperatures. The temperature at the slave tag would influence the tick count of its oscillator, which would be known to have a predictable change in tick frequency in response to changes in temperature.

Penc = Tf (temp)

Where Penc = period of Manchester encoder pulses; Tf = sigmoid type function; temp = temperature

The relationship between temperature and frequency would be calibrated prior to use and stored in the procedure memory of the master tag. It could also be stored in the slave tag's procedure memory, instead of or part of its ID. Deviation of the returning RF signal's frequency from that of the stable oscillator in the master tag would be determined and compared to the frequency-temperature calibration data for the slave tag's oscillator. The resulting calculated temperature at the slave tag would then be recorded in the master tag's temperature data memory. As indicated above, the data could be stored in the slave tag's memory, perhaps after having been calculated and recorded at the master tag. At a later time, a party interested in the temperature to which the container was exposed could download the stored temperature data from the master tag using a RF or other type of reader.

In use, the slave tag is placed inside a container at the time of shipping or at the time of manufacture of such container. The master tag is placed outside the container in close proximity, such as attached to the container by adhesive or other means. The master tag is programmed to cause the slave tag to transmit data to it at intervals of interest to the user.

The master tag polls the slave tag by transmitting an RF signal that excites the slave tag's tick oscillator and provides energy to the device. The Slave tag responds by transmitting an RF signal that can be detected by the master tag. Because of the sensitivity of the slave tag's tick oscillator to changes in temperature, its signal will deviate from the master tag's RF frequency according to a predictable relationship.

Calibration data for the slave tag's temperature-frequency relationship will be stored either in the slave tag's or master tag's memory, and the difference in frequency from the transmitted RF signal to the received RF signal will be applied to the calibration data to determine the temperature at the slave tag. This will be time stamped and recorded in the master tag's data memory, or possibly in the slave tag's memory.

To calibrate the slave tag's temperature-frequency relationship

Penc = Tf (temp)

Penc is determined under two or more specific temperatures temp....... tempn. To achieve this, the slave tag could be inserted into a temperature insulated chamber containing a thermoelectric element (effet Peltier). The temperature could be changed rapidly and with precision, allowing Penct

Penc„ to be determined. The specific function can then be calculated for this tag sample and stored in the procedure memory of the slave tag from which it would be downloaded to the master tag or writer/reader to be used in temperature determination. This would obviate the necessity of uniquely pairing slave and master tags. The temperature-frequency function might equally be stored in the procedure memory of the master tag if specific master-slave pairs are to be used. From this function the temperature can be computed for any value of Penc.

To provide very exact temperature measurements (+/- 0.1 degree C), each tag would be calibrated. However, in large scale implementation calibration could be generalized to the design and components of a particular type of slave tag (such as a standard RFID tag produced by a particular manufacturer) and therefore avoid the requirement for individual calibration of each tag. In such cases, a generic calibration coefficient would be sufficient to provide temperature measurements in the +/- 1 degree C range, if not better.

As described by Petersen and Wilson in Canadian Application No. 2,383,049, the temperature data can be retrieved from the master tag or from the slave tag, if stored there, by an interested party. The master tag can be single use or multiple use and may be reprogrammable. Petersen and Wilson describe various means by which this might be done. The slave tag can also be single use or reusable

In a variation of the invention, the master tag is omitted from the system and the passive RFID slave tag is inserted into a package or container. Each time the package passes through a RF reader at a loading station, unloading station, sorting station, warehouse or delivery point, as is currently in widespread use for tracking the movement of such packages, the temperature at the RFID tag at that time could also be determined and processed (stored, downloaded) by the reader. This would allow a central database to keep track of the time and internal temperature of the package at each waypoint in systems where such packages are already being scanned and tracked using barcodes and/or RFID tags.

In a further variation of the invention, the package ID, electronic packing slip, other logistics related information, manufacturer code (to facilitate "generic" calibration - see above) and temperature sensitive components could be combined in a single passive RFID tag, thereby eliminating the requirement for additional hardware to provide the benefit of temperature measurements, by utilizing RFID readers and passive RFID tags already incorporated into the logistics infrastructure of shipping and courier companies.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2001035064A1 *24 Oct 200017 May 2001Durametrics, Inc.Ultrasonic thermometer system
EP0563713A2 *19 Mar 19936 Oct 1993Hughes Aircraft CompanyRemote identification sensor system
GB2308947A * Title not available
US6359444 *28 May 199919 Mar 2002University Of Kentucky Research FoundationRemote resonant-circuit analyte sensing apparatus with sensing structure and associated method of sensing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2009131381A3 *22 Apr 200920 May 2010Electronics And Telecommunications Research InstituteRfid reader, rfid tag, and controlling method thereof
WO2011055014A1 *3 Nov 201012 May 2011Valtion Teknillinen TutkimuskeskusMethod for temperature measurement
WO2012052603A1 *12 Jan 201126 Apr 2012Upm Rfid OyA method for measuring environment using a calibration database
WO2012052604A1 *12 Jan 201126 Apr 2012Upm Rfid OyTemperature managed chain
WO2012052607A1 *4 May 201126 Apr 2012Upm Rfid OyMethods for enhancing the accuracy of environment measurements using a remote-access apparatus
CN102762967A *3 Nov 201031 Oct 2012Vtt科技研究中心Method for temperature measurement
EP2630457A4 *12 Jan 201131 May 2017Smartrac Ip BvTemperature managed chain
EP2630733A1 *4 May 201128 Aug 2013Smartrac IP B.V.Methods for enhancing the accuracy of environment measurements using a remote-access apparatus
EP2630733A4 *4 May 201110 May 2017Smartrac Ip BvMethods for enhancing the accuracy of environment measurements using a remote-access apparatus
US697337113 Oct 20046 Dec 2005Nadir BenoualiUnit dose compliance monitoring and reporting device and system
US730143912 Nov 200427 Nov 2007Fujitsu LimitedRadio IC tag reader writer, radio IC tag system, and radio IC tag data writing method
US732726019 May 20055 Feb 2008International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method to record environmental condition on an RFID tag
US738226318 May 20063 Jun 2008Dow Global Technologies Inc.Oral drug compliance monitoring using radio frequency identification tags
US748924622 Jun 200710 Feb 2009International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method to record environmental condition on an RFID tag
US749225431 Mar 200617 Feb 2009Symbol Technologies, Inc.Radio frequency identification (RFID) based sensor networks
US76360311 May 200622 Dec 2009Honeywell International Inc.Sensor system including multiple radio frequency identification tags
US766757414 Dec 200623 Feb 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcSignal-processing systems and methods for RFID-tag signals
US773394430 Dec 20088 Jun 2010Terahop Networks, Inc.Operating GPS receivers in GPS-adverse environment
US776009414 Dec 200620 Jul 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID systems and methods for optical fiber network deployment and maintenance
US778324616 Jun 200624 Aug 2010Terahop Networks, Inc.Tactical GPS denial and denial detection system
US778782315 Sep 200631 Aug 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRadio-over-fiber (RoF) optical fiber cable system with transponder diversity and RoF wireless picocellular system using same
US784865428 Sep 20067 Dec 2010Corning Cable Systems LlcRadio-over-fiber (RoF) wireless picocellular system with combined picocells
US785569713 Aug 200721 Dec 2010Corning Cable Systems, LlcAntenna systems for passive RFID tags
US791134512 May 200822 Mar 2011General Electric CompanyMethods and systems for calibration of RFID sensors
US804592925 Jun 200925 Oct 2011Terahop Networks, Inc.Determining presence of radio frequency communication device
US805066816 Jun 20091 Nov 2011Terahop Networks, Inc.Determining presence of radio frequency communication device
US81724686 May 20108 May 2012Corning IncorporatedRadio frequency identification (RFID) in communication connections, including fiber optic components
US817545912 Oct 20078 May 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcHybrid wireless/wired RoF transponder and hybrid RoF communication system using same
US820784818 May 200926 Jun 2012Google Inc.Locking system for shipping container including bolt seal and electronic device with arms for receiving bolt seal
US824820815 Jul 200821 Aug 2012Corning Cable Systems, Llc.RFID-based active labeling system for telecommunication systems
US82643559 Oct 200811 Sep 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID systems and methods for optical fiber network deployment and maintenance
US826436631 Mar 200911 Sep 2012Corning IncorporatedComponents, systems, and methods for associating sensor data with component location
US827526515 Feb 201025 Sep 2012Corning Cable Systems LlcDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US833351813 Mar 201218 Dec 2012Corning IncorporatedRadio frequency identification (RFID) in communication connections, including fiber optic components
US854833028 Oct 20101 Oct 2013Corning Cable Systems LlcSectorization in distributed antenna systems, and related components and methods
US864484421 Dec 20084 Feb 2014Corning Mobileaccess Ltd.Extending outdoor location based services and applications into enclosed areas
US87184785 Apr 20126 May 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcHybrid wireless/wired RoF transponder and hybrid RoF communication system using same
US873140528 Aug 200820 May 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcRFID-based systems and methods for collecting telecommunications network information
US883142823 Aug 20129 Sep 2014Corning Optical Communications LLCDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US886791927 Jan 201221 Oct 2014Corning Cable Systems LlcMulti-port accumulator for radio-over-fiber (RoF) wireless picocellular systems
US887358517 Dec 200728 Oct 2014Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistributed antenna system for MIMO technologies
US891389210 Sep 201316 Dec 2014Coring Optical Communications LLCSectorization in distributed antenna systems, and related components and methods
US90371438 Feb 201319 May 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRemote antenna clusters and related systems, components, and methods supporting digital data signal propagation between remote antenna units
US90427325 Mar 201326 May 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services in optical fiber-based distributed radio frequency (RF) communication systems, and related components and methods
US905852913 Aug 201316 Jun 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRFID-based systems and methods for collecting telecommunications network information
US911261112 Jun 201318 Aug 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCOptical fiber-based distributed antenna systems, components, and related methods for calibration thereof
US913061329 Aug 20128 Sep 2015Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistributed antenna system for MIMO technologies
US914210729 Apr 201322 Sep 2015Deal Magic Inc.Wireless tracking and monitoring electronic seal
US915901230 Nov 201013 Oct 2015Corning IncorporatedRFID condition latching
US916523214 May 201220 Oct 2015Corning IncorporatedRadio-frequency identification (RFID) tag-to-tag autoconnect discovery, and related methods, circuits, and systems
US917728217 Aug 20103 Nov 2015Deal Magic Inc.Contextually aware monitoring of assets
US91786353 Jan 20143 Nov 2015Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSeparation of communication signal sub-bands in distributed antenna systems (DASs) to reduce interference
US918484324 Oct 201310 Nov 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US92020934 May 20111 Dec 2015Smartrac Ip B.V.Methods for enhancing the accuracy of environment measurements using a remote-access apparatus
US92129543 Nov 201015 Dec 2015Teknologian Tutkimuskeskus VttMethod for temperature measurement
US92198793 Jan 201422 Dec 2015Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US924083525 Oct 201319 Jan 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCSystems, methods, and devices for increasing radio frequency (RF) power in distributed antenna systems
US924754323 Jul 201326 Jan 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMonitoring non-supported wireless spectrum within coverage areas of distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US925805216 Sep 20149 Feb 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCReducing location-dependent interference in distributed antenna systems operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US927037413 May 201523 Feb 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services in optical fiber-based distributed radio frequency (RF) communications systems, and related components and methods
US929509923 Jul 201222 Mar 2016Google Inc.Wake-up broadcast including network information in common designation ad hoc wireless networking
US9316548 *10 Nov 201019 Apr 2016Endress + Hauser Wetzer Gmbh + Co. KgMeasuring arrangement for determining amount of heat
US931913821 Aug 201419 Apr 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDynamic cell bonding (DCB) for radio-over-fiber (RoF)-based networks and communication systems and related methods
US932542915 Aug 201326 Apr 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services as electrical signals and radio-frequency (RF) communications over optical fiber in distributed communications systems, and related components and methods
US935755130 May 201431 May 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystems and methods for simultaneous sampling of serial digital data streams from multiple analog-to-digital converters (ADCS), including in distributed antenna systems
US93692229 Nov 201514 Jun 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US938581023 Sep 20145 Jul 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdConnection mapping in distributed communication systems
US942054225 Sep 201416 Aug 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystem-wide uplink band gain control in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on per band gain control of remote uplink paths in remote units
US945578425 Oct 201327 Sep 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDeployable wireless infrastructures and methods of deploying wireless infrastructures
US948502211 Dec 20151 Nov 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US952547230 Jul 201420 Dec 2016Corning IncorporatedReducing location-dependent destructive interference in distributed antenna systems (DASS) operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US952548811 Feb 201120 Dec 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCDigital data services and/or power distribution in optical fiber-based distributed communications systems providing digital data and radio frequency (RF) communications services, and related components and methods
US952602017 Dec 201520 Dec 2016Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMonitoring non-supported wireless spectrum within coverage areas of distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US953145226 May 201527 Dec 2016Corning Optical Communications LLCHybrid intra-cell / inter-cell remote unit antenna bonding in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) distributed antenna systems (DASs)
US953231029 Jun 201527 Dec 2016Google Inc.Receiver state estimation in a duty cycled radio
US956383215 Mar 20137 Feb 2017Corning IncorporatedExcess radio-frequency (RF) power storage and power sharing RF identification (RFID) tags, and related connection systems and methods
US960221016 Sep 201521 Mar 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdFlexible head-end chassis supporting automatic identification and interconnection of radio interface modules and optical interface modules in an optical fiber-based distributed antenna system (DAS)
US962129319 Jan 201511 Apr 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdDistribution of time-division multiplexed (TDM) management services in a distributed antenna system, and related components, systems, and methods
US964775821 Nov 20139 May 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdCabling connectivity monitoring and verification
US96527071 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Radio frequency identification (RFID) connected tag communications protocol and related systems and methods
US96527081 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Protocol for communications between a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag and a connected device, and related systems and methods
US96527091 Feb 201216 May 2017Fiber Mountain, Inc.Communications between multiple radio frequency identification (RFID) connected tags and one or more devices, and related systems and methods
US966178128 Jul 201423 May 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdRemote units for distributed communication systems and related installation methods and apparatuses
US967390411 Aug 20156 Jun 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCOptical fiber-based distributed antenna systems, components, and related methods for calibration thereof
US968131315 Apr 201513 Jun 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdOptimizing remote antenna unit performance using an alternative data channel
US969973626 Aug 20164 Jul 2017Google Inc.Reducing a number of wake-up frames in a sequence of wake-up frames
US97151578 Dec 201525 Jul 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdVoltage controlled optical directional coupler
US97292383 Oct 20168 Aug 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCRadio-over-fiber (ROF) system for protocol-independent wired and/or wireless communication
US97292678 Dec 20158 Aug 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdMultiplexing two separate optical links with the same wavelength using asymmetric combining and splitting
US973022829 Aug 20148 Aug 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdIndividualized gain control of remote uplink band paths in a remote unit in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on combined uplink power level in the remote unit
US977512325 Mar 201526 Sep 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless Ltd.Individualized gain control of uplink paths in remote units in a distributed antenna system (DAS) based on individual remote unit contribution to combined uplink power
US978827916 Aug 201610 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdSystem-wide uplink band gain control in a distributed antenna system (DAS), based on per-band gain control of remote uplink paths in remote units
US980679723 Sep 201531 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCSystems, methods, and devices for increasing radio frequency (RF) power in distributed antenna systems
US980770012 Feb 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless LtdOffsetting unwanted downlink interference signals in an uplink path in a distributed antenna system (DAS)
US980772210 Jun 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCDetermining propagation delay of communications in distributed antenna systems, and related components, systems, and methods
US980777229 Apr 201631 Oct 2017Corning Optical Communications Wireless Ltd.Systems and methods for simultaneous sampling of serial digital data streams from multiple analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), including in distributed antenna systems
US981312718 Jan 20167 Nov 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCReducing location-dependent interference in distributed antenna systems operating in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) configuration, and related components, systems, and methods
US981316424 Oct 20167 Nov 2017Corning Optical Communications LLCProviding digital data services as electrical signals and radio-frequency (RF) communications over optical fiber in distributed communications systems, and related components and methods
US20120245884 *10 Nov 201027 Sep 2012Endress + Wetzer GmbH _ Co. KGMeasuring arrangement for determining amount of heat
Classifications
International ClassificationG06K7/00, G01K3/04, G07C9/00, G06K19/077
Cooperative ClassificationG06K19/07749, G06K19/0717, G06K7/0008, G06K19/07758, G01K3/04, G06K19/0724, G07C9/00111
European ClassificationG06K19/077T3, G06K19/07E2, G06K19/07T2, G06K7/00E, G07C9/00B10, G01K3/04, G06K19/077T
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
27 Nov 2003AKDesignated states
Kind code of ref document: A1
Designated state(s): AE AG AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY BZ CA CH CN CO CR CU CZ DE DK DM DZ EC EE ES FI GB GD GE GH GM HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MA MD MG MK MN MW MX MZ NI NO NZ OM PH PL PT RO RU SC SD SE SG SK SL TJ TM TN TR TT TZ UA UG US UZ VC VN YU ZA ZM ZW
27 Nov 2003ALDesignated countries for regional patents
Kind code of ref document: A1
Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW MZ SD SL SZ TZ UG ZM ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE ES FI FR GB GR HU IE IT LU MC NL PT RO SE SI SK TR BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GQ GW ML MR NE SN TD TG
21 Jan 2004121Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
6 Jul 2005122Ep: pct application non-entry in european phase
6 Jul 2006NENPNon-entry into the national phase in:
Ref country code: JP
6 Jul 2006WWWWipo information: withdrawn in national office
Country of ref document: JP