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Publication numberWO2000022586 A2
Publication typeApplication
Application numberPCT/US1999/027902
Publication date20 Apr 2000
Filing date27 Aug 1999
Priority date28 Aug 1998
Also published asCA2362115A1, EP1149368A2, EP1149368A4, WO2000022586A3, WO2000022586A9
Publication numberPCT/1999/27902, PCT/US/1999/027902, PCT/US/1999/27902, PCT/US/99/027902, PCT/US/99/27902, PCT/US1999/027902, PCT/US1999/27902, PCT/US1999027902, PCT/US199927902, PCT/US99/027902, PCT/US99/27902, PCT/US99027902, PCT/US9927902, WO 0022586 A2, WO 0022586A2, WO 2000/022586 A2, WO 2000022586 A2, WO 2000022586A2, WO-A2-0022586, WO-A2-2000022586, WO0022586 A2, WO0022586A2, WO2000/022586A2, WO2000022586 A2, WO2000022586A2
InventorsRaymond J. Menard, Curtis E. Quady
ApplicantRoyal Thoughts L.L.C.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: Patentscope, Espacenet
Detection communication systems
WO 2000022586 A2
Abstract
A system is described for transmitting detection signals to a destination of interest. The destination may be at least one central station (10) or at least one remote user device (40).
Claims  (OCR text may contain errors)
What is claimed is:
1. A method, comprising: signaling a remote user of a detected event using a bi-directional long distance wireless network; and coordinating a dispatch process at a central station based on a signal transmitted from the remote user in response to the detected event; wherein the remote user may cancel the dispatch process to prevent false dispatching.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the remote user may verify an alarm for the detected event.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station to adjust or direct dispatch efforts.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station to indicate a false alarm.
6. The method of claim 1, comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a paging network.
7. The method of claim 1, comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a cell phone network.
8. The method of claim 1, comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a two-way paging network.
9. The method of claim 1, comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a wireless transmission network.
10. The method of claim 1, comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a ReFLEX 25 paging network.
11. The method of claim 1 , comprising transmission of a signal to the remote user over a ReFLEX 50 paging network.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the detected event is communicated to the central station and the remote user over the bi-directional long distance wireless network.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a ReFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
15. The method of claim 12, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a ReFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
16. The method of claim 12, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein the central station and the remote user receive nearly simultaneous notification.
18. The method of claim 1, comprising using an encoding method to burst transmit data between the detected event, the user and the central station.
19. The method of claim 1, comprising using message interpretation within a transmission network to coordinate addressing and retransmission of messages.
20. The method of claim 1, comprising using message interpretation within a transmission network to handle various messages differently so that the type of message changes its transmission path, handling, and encoding protocol.
21. The method of claim 1, comprising using capcodes to identify any number of and any combination of a detection system, a personal communication device, and the central station.
22. The method of claim 1, comprising using capcodes to communicate with any number of and any combination of a detection system, a personal communication device, and the central station.
23. The method of claim 1 , comprising using response paging to respond to the detected event.
24. The method of claim 1, comprising using one or more presaved messages on a personal communication device to respond to the detected event.
25. The method of claim 1, comprising using one or more presaved response messages on a personal communication device to respond to the detected event.
26. The method of claim 1, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using a personal communication device.
27. The method of claim 1, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using the bi-directional long distance wireless network.
28. A response system, comprising: a detection system; a central station; and a wireless two way communication device receiving information related to a detected event from the detection system; wherein the wireless two way communication device is operable to provide a signal to cancel a dispatch response by control of a user.
29. The response system of claim 28, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to cancel an alarm.
30. The response system of claim 28, wherein the signal is transmitted to the alarm system to cancel an alarm.
31. The response system of claim 28, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to verify an alarm.
32. The response system of claim 28, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to indicate a false alarm.
33. The response system of claim 28, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to adjust or direct dispatch efforts.
34. The response system of claim 28, comprising a paging network.
35. The response system of claim 28, comprising a two-way paging network.
36. The response system of claim 28, comprising a cell phone network.
37. The response system of claim 28, comprising a wireless transmission network.
38. The response system of claim 28, wherein the wireless two way communication device is a cell phone.
39. The response system of claim 28, wherein the wireless two way communication device is a two way pager.
40. The response system of claim 28, wherein the wireless two way communication device is a two way pager compatible with a REFLEX 25 paging protocol.
41. The response system of claim 28, wherein the wireless two way communication device is a two way pager compatible with a REFLEX 50 paging protocol.
42. The response system of claim 28, wherein a detected event is communicated to the central station and the user over a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
43. The response system of claim 42, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
44. The response system of claim 42, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
45. The response system of claim 42, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
46. The response system of claim 42, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
47. The response system of claim 42, wherein the central station and the user receive nearly simultaneous notification.
48. The response system of claim 28, wherein encoding is used to burst transmit data between the detected event, the user and the central station.
49. The response system of claim 28, wherein message interpretation is used within a transmission network to coordinate addressing and retransmission of messages.
50. The response system of claim 28, wherein message interpretation is used within a transmission network to handle various messages differently so that the type of message changes its transmission path, handling, and encoding protocol.
51. The response system of claim 28, comprising using capcodes to identify any number of and any combination of the alarm system, the communication device, and the central station.
52. The response system of claim 28, comprising using response paging to respond to the detected event.
53. The response system of claim 28, comprising using one or more presaved messages on the communication device to respond to the detected event.
54. The response system of claim 28, comprising using one or more presaved response messages on the communication device to respond to a detected event.
55. The response system of claim 28, comprising converting codes into text relating to a detected event using the communication device.
56. The response system of claim 28, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
57. A system comprising: an alarm panel to provide an alarm signal; a transmitter receptive to the alarm signal from the alarm panel; and at least one look-up table to encode the alarm signal of the alarm panel as one of a plurality of event types into a message, wherein the message includes a code for each event type, and wherein the message includes a destination string.
58. The system of claim 57, wherein the transmitter is compatible with either FLEX or ReFLEX protocol.
59. The system of claim 57, further comprising: a network to pass the message of the at least one look-up table; and a second look-up table to decode the destination string of the message to determine a decoded destination of the message, wherein the network passes the message to the decoded destination of the message.
60. The system of claim 59, wherein the network is compatible with either FLEX or ReFLEX protocol.
61. The system of claim 57, further comprising: at least one central station to receive the message from the network; and a third look-up table to decode the code of the message, wherein the third look-up table produces a security code from the code of the message.
62. The system of claim 58, wherein the at least one central station further comprises a personal computer to receive the code of the message.
63. A method comprising: reading an alarm bus by a transmitter for at least one alarm signal; and encoding the at least one alarm signal into a message by looking up at least one table that is stored in the transmitter, wherein the act of encoding encodes the at least one alarm signal into a code representing one of a plurality of event types into the message, and wherein the act of encoding encodes a destination string into the message.
64. The method of claim 63, further comprising classifying priority of the at least one alarm signal when a plurality of alarm signals is presented on the alarm bus.
65. The method of claim 63, further comprising decoding the destination string to determine the destination of the message.
66. The method of claim 63, further comprising decoding the code representing one of the plurality of event types into a security code.
67. The method of claim 66, further comprising passing the security code to an automation system of a central station.
68. A data structure for containing a message to be wirelessly transmitted using a narrowband personal communication system, the data structure comprising: an event identifier to identify an occurrence of an alarm event; and an event descriptor to describe the alarm event in at least one detail.
69. The data structure of claim 68, further comprising a location identifier to identify a location of interest.
70. The data structure of claim 68, wherein the location identifier identifies a premise where the alarm event has occurred.
71. The data structure of claim 68, wherein the event identifier identifies that a burglary event is occurring.
72. The data structure of claim 68, wherein the event identifier identifies that a fire event is occurring.
73. The data structure of claim 68, wherein the event descriptor describes an area within the location of interest where the alarm event is occurring.
74. A data structure for containing a message to be wirelessly transmitted using a narrowband personal communication system, the data structure comprising: a destination string to identify at least one destination where the message is to be transmitted; a location identifier to identify a location of interest; an event identifier to identify an occurrence of an alarm event at the location of interest; and an event descriptor to describe the alarm event in at least one detail.
75. The data structure of claim 74, wherein the destination string identifies a primary destination and a secondary destination.
76. The data structure of claim 75, wherein the message is wireless transmitted to the secondary destination if the message cannot be transmitted to the primary destination.
77. The data structure of claim 75, wherein the data structure is formatted to be compatible with FLEX or ReFLEX protocol.
78. The data structure of claim 74, wherein the location identifier identifies the location of interest through the use of a capcode.
79. A system comprising: a detection system to provide an alarm signal when the detection system detects at least one alarm event at a location of interest, wherein the alarm signal is encoded into a first message; and a bi-directional device to provide a control signal to control the detection system, wherein the control signal is encoded into a second message, and wherein the bi-directional pager is receptive to the first message from the detection system.
80. The system of claim 79, further comprising a narrow-band personal communication system to communicate the first message from the detection system to the bi-directional device, wherein the narrow-band personal communicating system communicates a second message from the bi-directional pager to the detection system.
81. The system of claim 79, wherein the bi-directional device is a pager.
82. The system of claim 79, wherein the bi-directional device is a cell phone.
83. The system of claim 80, wherein the narrow-band personal communication system communicates through using a rapid burst method.
84. The system of claim 80, wherein the narrow-band personal communication system communicates a short, predetermined digitally encoded message from the detection system to the bi-directional device.
85. The system of claim 79, further comprising a network to coordinate the transmission of messages.
86. The system of claim 79, wherein the bi-directional device includes a look-up table to decode the first message so as to obtain the alarm event at the location of interest.
87. The system of claim 85, wherein the network includes a look-up table to decode the first message so as to obtain the alarm event at the location of interest, wherein the network sends the alarm event at the location of interest to the bi-directional device.
88. The system of claim 80, wherein the detection system includes a look-up table to decode the second message so as to obtain the control signal from the bi-directional device.
89. The system of claim 85, wherein the network includes a look-up table to decode the second message so as to obtain the control signal from the bi-directional device, wherein the network forwards the control signal to the detection system.
90. A method comprising: detecting an alarm event; encoding the alarm event into a message, wherein the act of encoding further encodes a destination string into the message; transmitting the message to a network; and decoding the message so as to alert the first bi-directional device that the alarm event has been detected.
91. The method of claim 90, wherein decoding the message further comprises decoding the destination string by the network to obtain an identification of the first bi-directional device so that the network may send the message to the first bi-directional device.
92. The method of claim 91, wherein decoding the message further comprises decoding the destination string by the network to obtain an identification of a second bi-directional device if the message may not be sent to the first bi-directional device.
93. A personal emergency communication system, comprising: a two way paging device adapted for transmitting an emergency notification to a response agency over a long range, bi-directional, wireless communication network upon activation by a user and for receiving an acknowledge signal from the response agency.
94. The system of claim 93, wherein the paging device is adapted for receipt and display of instructions or queries from the response agency.
95. The system of claim 94, wherein the paging device is adapted for query response.
96. The system of claim 93, wherein the paging device is adapted for transmitting a request cancellation.
97. The system of claim 96, wherein the paging device is adapted for entry of a passcode to issue a request cancellation.
98. The system of claim 93, wherein a position of the user is transmitted to the response agency.
99. The system of claim 93, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a medical condition.
100. The system of claim 93, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a hold up condition.
101. The system of claim 93, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a personal emergency.
102. The system of claim 93, wherein the paging device is a two way pager adapted for single button activation for transmission of an emergency notification.
103. The system of claim 102, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network.
104. The system of claim 93, wherein the paging device is compatible with a ReFLEX 25 paging protocol.
105. The system of claim 93, wherein the paging device is compatible with a ReFLEX 50 paging protocol.
106. The system of claim 93, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network using ReFLEX 25 paging protocols.
107. The system of claim 93, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network using ReFLEX 50 paging protocols.
108. The system of claim 93, wherein capcodes are used to identify the paging device.
109. A personal emergency communication system, comprising: a two way communication device adapted for transmitting an emergency notification to a response agency over a long range, bi-directional, wireless communication network upon activation by a user and for receiving an acknowledge signal from the response agency, wherein the acknowledge signal is used to trigger an annunciator indicating receipt of the emergency notification.
110. The system of claim 109, wherein the annunciator is a visual indicator.
111. The system of claim 109, wherein the annunciator is a mechanical indicator.
112. The system of claim 109, wherein the annunciator is an audible indicator.
113. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a pager and wherein the annunciator is a light.
114. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a pager and wherein the annunciator is a readable display.
115. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a pager and wherein the annunciator is a vibrating means.
116. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a pager and wherein the annunciator is an audible message.
117. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a cellular telephone and wherein the annunciator is a light.
118. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a cellular telephone and wherein the annunciator is a readable display.
119. The system of clahn 109, wherein the communication device is a cellular telephone and wherein the annunciator is a vibrating means.
120. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a cellular telephone and wherein the annunciator is an audible message.
121. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is adapted for receipt and display of instructions or queries from the response agency.
122. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is adapted for query response.
123. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is adapted for transmitting a request cancellation.
124. The system of claim 123, wherein the communication device is adapted for entry of a passcode to issue a request cancellation.
125. The system of claim 109, wherein a position of the user is transmitted to the response agency.
126. The system of claim 109, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a medical condition.
127. The system of claim 109, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a hold up condition.
128. The system of claim 109, wherein a signal is transmitted to the response agency to indicate a personal emergency.
129. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is a two way pager adapted for single button activation for transmission of an emergency notification.
130. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network.
131. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is compatible with a ReFLEX 25 paging protocol.
132. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication device is compatible with a ReFLEX 50 paging protocol.
133. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network using ReFLEX 25 paging protocols.
134. The system of claim 109, wherein the communication network is a two-way paging network using ReFLEX 50 paging protocols.
135. The system of claim 109, wherein capcodes are used to identify the communication device.
136. A method, comprising: processing signals received by a response agency from one or more long range, bidirectional, wireless communication devices, the communication devices adapted for transmitting the signals to the response agency over a long range, bi-directional, wireless communication network upon activation by a user; wherein the processing includes transmission of an acknowledge from the response agency to the communication devices.
137. The method of claim 136, comprising transmission of emergency notifications to the communication devices.
138. The method of claim 136, comprising transmission of instructions to the communication devices.
139. The method of claim 136, comprising transmission of queries to the communication devices.
140. The method of claim 136, comprising processing of query requests.
141. The method of claim 136, comprising processing a position transmitted to the response agency to locate the user at a mobile location.
142. The method of claim 136, wherein the emergency notification indicates a medical condition.
143. The method of claim 136, wherein the emergency notification indicates a hold up condition.
144. The method of claim 136, wherein the emergency notification indicates a personal emergency.
145. The method of claim 136, wherein capcodes are used to identify the user's device.
146. The method of claim 136, wherein the user receives a response indicating successful transmission of the signal and an option to cancel response to accidentally tripped signals.
147. The method of claim 136, wherein the user is reminded to test their device.
148. The method of claim 136, wherein the user is reminded to take a medication, other reminders, verifications, instructions, checks, and responds with an acknowledgment.
149. The method of claim 136, wherein the user is requested to respond with an acknowledgment to a wellness check.
150. A method, comprising: processing signals received by a response agency from one or two way paging devices, the communication devices adapted for transmitting the signals to the response agency over a long range, bi-directional, wireless communication network upon activation by a user; wherein the processing includes transmission of an acknowledge from the response agency to the paging devices.
151. The method of claim 150, comprising transmission of emergency notifications to the paging devices.
152. The method of claim 150, comprising transmission of instructions to the communication devices.
153. The method of claim 150, comprising transmission of queries to the communication devices.
154. The method of claim 150, comprising processing of query requests.
155. The method of claim 150, comprising processing a position transmitted to the response agency to locate the user at a mobile location.
156. The method of claim 150, wherein the emergency notification indicates a medical condition.
157. The method of claim 150, wherein the emergency notification indicates a hold up condition.
158. The method of claim 150, wherein the emergency notification indicates a personal emergency.
159. The method of claim 150, wherein capcodes are used to identify the user's device.
160. The method of claim 150, wherein the user receives a response indicating successful transmission of the signal and an option to cancel response to accidentally tripped signals.
161. The method of claim 150, wherein the user is reminded to test their device.
162. The method of claim 150, wherein the user is reminded to take a medication, other reminders, verifications, instructions, checks, and responds with an acknowledgment.
163. The method of claim 150, wherein the user is requested to respond with an acknowledgment to a wellness check.
164. A method comprising: providing communications to an assisted living response center using a plurality of long range, bi-directional, wireless communication devices coupled to a long range, bidirectional, wireless communication network; and supporting medication reminders, wellness checks, and emergency notifications by processing signals from the communications devices received by a response agency.
165. A system comprising: a first portable detection unit including: at least one detector to detect at least one event; a detection controller coupled to the at least one detector; and a detection bi-directional communications module coupled to the detection controller;
a first personal control panel including: an input/output device; a panel controller coupled to the input/output device; and a panel bi-directional communications module coupled to the panel controller; and
a long-range, bi-directional, wireless network communicating between the detection bi-directional communications module and the panel bi-directional communications module.
166. The system of claim 165, wherein either the detection bi-directional communications module or the panel bi-directional communications module is comprised of a bi-directional short range communications module with a network module.
167. The system of claim 165, wherein either the detection bi-directional communications module or the panel bi-directional communications module is a network module.
168. The system of claim 165, wherein the detection bi-directional communications module or the panel bi-directional communications module is a bi-directional short range communications module.
169. The system of claim 165, wherein the first portable detection unit further comprises an output module controllable by the first portable detection unit, the first personal control panel, or a combination of the first portable detection unit and the first personal control panel.
170. The system of claim 165, further comprising a second portable detection unit located in a geographic location diverse from the first portable detection unit, wherein the first personal control panel is programmable to control either the first portable detection unit or the second portable detection unit.
171. The system of claim 165, further comprising a second personal control panel that is capable of assuming the identity of the first personal control panel so as to gain a predetermined level of access to either the first portable detection unit or the second portable detection unit.
172. A method, whereby a detected event is communicated to remote users through the use of a long-range, bi-directional, wireless network connected by a wireless smart-modem to the detection devices and connected to the user through the use of personal programmable communication devices.
173. The method of claim 172, whereby other devices such as alarms and bells and actuation of equipment is accomplished by control of the user through the personal programmable communication device; and control and outputs associated with the smart- modem; and network intervention.
174. The method of claim 172, whereby through the use of low power demand devices the system is both portable and mobile requiring no connection to permanent power supply.
175. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network. is a paging network.
176. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
177. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
178. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a ReFLEX 25 paging network.
179. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a R3FLEX 50 paging network.
180. The method of claim 172, comprising sending its signals to a remote central monitoring station.
181. The method of claim 172, wherein the central station and the user receive nearly simultaneous notification.
182. The method of claim 180, wherein the signals to the remote central station are sent over a telephone network.
183. The method of claim 180, wherein the signals to the remote central station are sent over a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
184. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
185. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a ReFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
186. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a ReFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
187. The method of claim 172, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
188. A detection system consisting primarily of four types of components: a long-range, bi-directional wireless transmission device coupled to one or more detection devices ; the wireless transmission device receiving a signal from one or more detection devices and transmitting the signal through a long-range, bi-directional, wireless network to a remote user carrying a wireless communication device base on the received signal.
189. The detection system of claim 188, connected to and controlling local annunciation and other equipment such as alarms, bells, strobes, or equipment actuation and control.
190. The detection system of claim 188, operating on low power devices powered by battery providing a detection system without need of connection to permanent power or hardwired telephone line.
191. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network, is a paging network.
192. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
193. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
194. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 paging network.
195. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 paging network.
196. The detection system of claim 188, comprising sending its signals to a remote central monitoring station.
197. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the central station and the user receive nearly simultaneous notification.
198. The detection system of claim 196, wherein the signals to the remote central station are sent over a telephone network.
199. The detection system of claim 196, wherein the signals to the remote central station are sent over a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
200. The detection system of claim 199, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
201. The detection system of claim 199, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
202. The detection system of claim 199, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
203. The detection system of claim 199, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
204. A method, whereby a remote user is able to exercise control over a detection system and its related and connected components through the use of personal programmable communication devices carried by the user; communicating through a long-range, bidirectional, wireless network to a detection system connected to a wireless smart-modem.
205. The method of claim 204, wherein security passwords may be used by using numeric or other keys on the device.
206. The method of claim 204, wherein security passwords may be used by pressing a distinct order and/or duration of certain keys.
207. The method of claim 204, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
208. The method of claim 204, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
209. The method of claim 204, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
210. The method of claim 204, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
211. The method of claim 204, wherein voice generated information is provided to the user.
212. The method of claim 204, wherein voice commands are interpreted by a system for command and control functions.
213. The method of claim 204, wherein data generated by a system is displayed on a screen available to the user.
214. The method of claim 204, wherein data entered via a keypad provides commands interpreted by a system for command and control functions.
215. The method of claim 204, wherein data generated by a system is displayed with lights on the user device.
216. The method of claim 204, wherein the user exercises control via appropriately labeled function keys.
217. The method of claim 204, wherein the user device is a commercially manufactured hand-held computing device, connected to a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
218. The method of claim 217, using a one way pager.
219. The method of claim 217, using a pager configured with response messaging.
220. The method of claim 217, using an adapted two way pager.
221. The method of claim 217, using a programmable or adapted paging device.
222. The method of claim 217, using a programmable or adapted cellular phone device.
223. The method of claim 217, using a Palm Pilot™, a Palm Professional™, a Palm III™, or other Palm Pilot™ series of devices.
224. The method of claim 217, using a PageWriter™2000 or other PageWriter™ series of devices.
225. The method of claim 217, using a Nokia™ 9000 or other Nokia™ programmable series of devices.
226. A user device for command and control of a security, alarm, or detection system that uses a bi-directional long distance wireless network, for communication with the system.
227. The user device of claim 226, wherein security passwords may be entered by using alpha, numeric or other keys on the device.
228. The user device of claim 226, wherein security passwords may be entered by pressing a distinct order and/or duration of certain keys.
229. The user device of claim 226, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
230. The user device of claim 226, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
231. The user device of claim 226, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
232. The user device of claim 226, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
233. The user device of claim 226, wherein voice generated information is provided to the user.
234. The user device of claim 226, wherein voice commands are interpreted by a system for command and control functions.
235. The user device of claim 226, wherein data generated by a system is displayed on a screen available to the user.
236. The user device of claim 226, wherein data entered via a keypad provides commands interpreted by a system for command and control functions.
237. The user device of claim of 226, wherein data generated by a system is displayed with lights on the user device.
238. The user device of claim 226, wherein the user exercises control via appropriately labeled function keys.
239. The user device of claim 226, wherein the user device is a commercially manufactured handheld computing device, connected to a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
240. The user device of claim 239, comprising a one way pager.
241. The user device of claim 239, comprising a pager configured with response messaging.
242. The user device of claim 239, comprising an adapted two way pager.
243. The user device of claim 239, comprising a programmable or adapted paging device.
244. The user device of claim 239, comprising a programmable or adapted cellular phone device.
245. The user device of claim 239, comprising a Palm Pilot™, a Palm Professional™, a Palm III™, or other Palm Pilot™ series of devices.
246. The user device of claim 239, comprising a PageWriter™2000 or other PageWriter™ series of devices.
247. The user device of claim 239, comprising a Nokia™ 9000 or other Nokia™ programmable series of devices.
248. The method of claim 172 using the methods of claims 204-225.
249. The detection system of claim 188, comprising the user device of claims 226-247.
250. A method for a wireless personal communication and control device, the method comprising: using optionally one of two or more separate frequencies; wherein at least one of the frequencies connects to a bi-directional long distance wireless network; wherein at least one of the frequencies connects to a local wireless receiver or transceiver.
251. The method of claim 250, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a two-way paging network.
252. The method of claim 250, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 25 two-way paging network.
253. The method of claim 250, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a REFLEX 50 two-way paging network.
254. The method of claim 250, wherein the bi-directional long distance wireless network is a cell phone network.
255. The method of claim 250, wherein the application is used for more direct pager to pager communication.
256. The method of claim 250, wherein the application is used for more direct communication of devices over a paging type network.
257. A method of providing control of a detection, alarm or security system using the wireless communication and control method of claim 250.
258. The method of claim 172 that uses the wireless communication and control method of claim 250.
259. The method of claim 250, wherein the frequencies are selected manually.
260. The method of claim 250, wherein the frequencies are selected automatically.
261. The method of claim 250, wherein the user is notified by information on the device, whether visual, vibratory or audible, of the status of a transmission.
262. A wireless personal communication and control device comprising optionally using one of two or more separate frequencies; wherein at least one of the frequencies connects to a bi-directional long distance wireless network; wherein at least one of the frequencies connects to a local wireless receiver or transceiver.
263. The device of clahn 262 with claims 251 to 261 attached to it as device claims.
264. A method for a wireless personal communication and control comprising optionally using one of two or more combined transceivers or transmitters; wherein at least one of the transceivers or transmitters connects to a bi-directional long distance wireless network; wherein at least one of the transceivers or transmitters connects to a local wireless receiver or transceiver.
265. The method of claim 264 with claims 251 to 261 attached to it.
266. A wireless personal communication and control device comprising optionally using one of two or more combined transceivers or transmitters; wherein at least one of the transceivers or transmitters connects to a bi-directional long distance wireless network; wherein at least one of the transceivers or transmitters connects to a local wireless receiver or transceiver.
267. The device of claim 266 with claims 251 to 261 attached to it as device claims.
268. A method for a wireless personal communication and control service wherein a personal communication device can communicate through a bi-directional long distance wireless network; and the local network reads a message header and routes the message directly to a local destination, or uses the entire network capability to route the message to a more distant destination.
269. The method of claim 268 with claims 251 to 261 attached to it.
270. A wireless personal communication and control device wherein a personal communication device may communicate through a bi-directional long distance wireless network; and the local network reads a message header and routes the message directly to a local destination, or uses the entire network capability to route the message to a more distant destination.
271. The device of claim 270 with claims 251 to 261 attached to it as device claims.
272. The method of claim 172, wherein the long-range, bi-directional wireless transmission uses is a wireless modem or smart-modem that is designed to link to a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
273. The method of claim 172, wherein the long-range, bi-directional wireless transmission device is a CreataLink™ series product.
274. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the long-range, bi-directional wireless transmission device is a wireless modem or smart-modem that is designed to link to a bidirectional long distance wireless network.
275. The detection system of claim 188, wherein the long-range, bi-directional wireless transmission device is a CreataLink™ series product.
276. The method of claim 172, using a fixed coordinate generator to locate system coordinates.
277. The method of claim 276, comprising using a GPS receiver to locate system coordinates.
278. The method of claim 276, wherein the location coordinates are transmitted to the user.
279. The method of claim 276, wherein GPS coordinates are transmitted to the user.
280. The method of claim 276, wherein the location coordinates are transmitted to a central response center.
281. The method of claim 276, wherein the GPS coordinates are transmitted to a central response center.
282. The method of claim 276, wherein the user device has resident mapping capabilities.
283. The method of claim 276, wherein the user device has maps downloaded from a central database.
284. The method of claim 276, wherein the central response center and the user device both receive notification of a detected event, and the central response center downloads the maps to the remote user.
285. The method of claim 276, wherein the user device contains a coordinate determining device and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate direction information relative to the last known event location.
286. The method of claim 276, wherein the user device contains a GPS receiver and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate direction information relative to the last known event location.
287. The method of claim 276, wherein the user device contains a coordinate determining device and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate distance information relative to the last known event location.
288. The method of claim 269, wherein the user device contains a GPS receiver and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate distance information relative to the last known event location.
289. The method of claim 276, wherein the coordinates are updated by the detection system on an interval basis.
290. The detection system of claim 188, comprising using a fixed coordinate generator to locate system coordinates.
291. The detection system of claim 290, comprising using a GPS receiver to locate system coordinates.
292. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the location coordinates are transmitted to the user.
293. The detection system of claim 290, wherein GPS coordinates are transmitted to the user.
294. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the location coordinates are transmitted to a central response center.
295. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the GPS coordinates are transmitted to a central response center.
296. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device has resident mapping capabilities.
297. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device has maps downloaded from a central database.
298. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the central response center and the user device both receive notification of a detected event, and the central response center downloads the maps to the remote user.
299. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device contains a coordinate determining device and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate direction information relative to the last known event location.
300. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device contains a GPS receiver and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate direction information relative to the last known event location.
301. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device contains a coordinate determining device and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate distance information relative to the last known event location.
302. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the user device contains a GPS receiver and with the coordinates provided to the remote user from the detected event location is able to generate distance information relative to the last known event location.
303. The detection system of claim 290, wherein the coordinates are updated by the detection system on an interval basis.
304. A method whereby the functions inherent in many detection, alarm, and security systems such as system on/off (home-away-off, arm-disarm), delay zones, bypass/force arm, restore, opening and closing by user, prevention of multiple alarm transmissions in a specified period, and user control of system related functions is derived through the use of the inherent intelligence found in smart-modems, personal programmable communication devices and communication networks.
305. The detection system of claim 188, that provides the feature set standard to alarm systems such as system on/off (home-away-off, arm-disarm), delay zones, bypass/force arm, restore, opening and closing by user, prevention of multiple alarm transmissions in a specified period, and user control of system related functions.
306. A method, wherein, a detected event is confirmed before the transmission of signals to the central response center from a particular detector or group of detectors by providing the information and opportunity to a user through the use of an interface device.
307. The method of claim 306 whereby the detected event is relayed through the user device.
308. The method of claim 306 wherein there is a delay time built into the system or the user device as an opportunity to confirm a signal transmission.
309. The method of claim 306 wherein the confirmation is required before transmission of signals regarding a detected event.
310. The method of claim 306 wherein a user confirmed event is coded with the meaning of "confirmed" at the central response center.
311. The method of claim 306 wherein the confirmation is optional before transmission of signals regarding a detected event.
312. The method of claim 306 wherein the event is coded with the meaning of "unconfirmed" at the central response center if the user has not acted upon it.
313. A method, whereby a detection, security or alarm system uses the method detailed in claim 306 and its associated claims.
314. A method according to claim 172, using the method detailed in claim 306 and its associated claims.
315. A detection system, whereby, a detected event is confirmed before the transmission of signals to the central response center from a particular detector or group of detectors by providing the information and opportunity to a user through the use of an interface device.
316. The system of claim 315, whereby the detected event is relayed through a user device.
317. The system of claim 315, wherein there is a delay time built into the system or the user device as an opportunity to confirm a signal transmission.
318. The system of claim 315, wherein the confirmation is required before transmission of signals regarding a detected event.
319. The system of claim 315, wherein a user confirmed event is coded with the meaning of "confirmed" at the central response center.
320. The system of claim 315, wherein the confirmation is optional before transmission of signals regarding a detected event.
321. The system of claim 315, wherein the event is coded with the meaning of "unconfirmed" at the central response center if the user has not acted upon it.
322. A detection, security or alarm device that uses the system detailed in claim 315 and its associated claims.
323. The detection system of claim 188 using the system detailed in claim 315 and its associated claims.
324. A method, according to claim 204, wherein a detection system responds with status information to a remote user regarding a current effort by the same user or another to arm or disarm a system or change any system status or controls.
325. The method of claim 324, wherein the status indicator is visual, auditory or vibratory on the user device.
326. The method of claim 324, wherein the status indicator is visual or auditory at the location of or in proximity to the detection system.
327. A method, whereby any detection, security or alarm system uses the method in claim 324 and its associated claims.
328. A method according to claim 172, using the method detailed in claim 324 and its associated claims.
329. A device, according to claim 226, wherein a detection system responds with status information to a remote user regarding a current effort by the same user or another to arm or disarm a system or change any system status or controls.
330. The device of claim 329 wherein the status indicator is visual, auditory or vibratory on the user device.
331. The device of claim 329, wherein the status indicator is a separate visual or auditory device at the location of or in proximity to the detection system.
332. A device, whereby any detection, security or alarm system uses the device in claim 329 and its associated claims.
333. A detection system according to claim 188, using the method detailed in claim 329 and its associated claims.
334. A method, according to claim 172, comprising: coordinating a dispatch process at a central station based on a signal transmitted from the remote user in response to the detected event; wherein the remote user may cancel the dispatch process to prevent false dispatching.
335. The method of claim 334, wherein the remote user may verify an alarm for the detected event.
336. The method of claim 334, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station.
337. The method of claim 334, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station to adjust or direct dispatch efforts.
338. The method of claim 334, wherein the signal from the remote user is transmitted to the central station to indicate a false alarm.
339. The detection system of claim 188, wherein, the wireless two way communication device is operable to provide a signal to cancel a dispatch response by control of a user.
340. The detection system of claim 339, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to cancel an alarm.
341. The detection system of claim 339, wherein the signal is transmitted to the alarm system to cancel an alarm.
342. The detection system of claim 339, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to verify an alarm.
343. The detection system of claim 339, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to indicate a false alarm.
344. The detection system of claim 339, wherein the signal is transmitted to the central station to adjust or direct dispatch efforts.
345. The method of claim 172, comprising using an encoding method to burst transmit data between the detected event, the user and the central station.
346. The method of claim 172, comprising using message interpretation within a transmission network to coordinate addressing and retransmission of messages.
347. The method of clahn 172, comprising using message interpretation within a transmission network to handle various messages differently so that the type of message changes its transmission path, handling, and encoding protocol.
348. The method of claim 172, comprising using capcodes to identify any number of and any combination of a detection system, a personal communication device, and the central station.
349. The method of claim 172, comprising using capcodes to communicate with any number of and any combination of a detection system, a personal communication device, and the central station.
350. The method of claim 172, comprising using response paging to respond to the detected event.
351. The method of claim 172, comprising using one or more presaved messages on a personal communication device to respond to the detected event.
352. The method of claim 172, comprising using one or more presaved response messages on a personal communication device to respond to the detected event.
353. The method of claim 172, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using a personal communication device.
354. The method of claim 172, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using the bi-directional long distance wireless network.
355. The detection system of claim 188, wherein encoding is used to burst transmit data between the detected event, the user and the central station.
356. The detection system of claim 188, wherein message interpretation is used within a transmission network to coordinate addressing and retransmission of messages.
357. The detection system of claim 188, wherein message interpretation is used within a transmission network to handle various messages differently so that the type of message changes its transmission path, handling, and encoding protocol.
358. The detection system of claim 188, comprising using capcodes to identify any number of and any combination of the alarm system, the communication device, and the central station.
359. The detection system of claim 188, comprising using response paging to respond to the detected event.
360. The detection system of claim 188, comprising using one or more presaved messages on the communication device to respond to the detected event.
361. The detection system of claim 188, comprising using one or more presaved response messages on the communication device to respond to a detected event.
362. The detection system of claim 188, comprising converting codes into text relating to a detected event using the communication device.
363. The detection system of claim 188, comprising converting codes into text relating to the detected event using a bi-directional long distance wireless network.
364. A system substantially as shown and described.
365. A device substantially as shown and described.
366. A data structure substantially as shown and described.
367. A method substantially as shown and described.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

DETECTION COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

Technical Field The present invention relates generally to communication networks. More particularly, it pertains to transmitting detection signals using communication networks.

Background Information In the security alarm industry, detection devices at a premise detect various conditions at the premise. These conditions may indicate fire, burglary, medical, environmental or other conditions that may exist. The security system then transmits the information to a central response center (central station) that then coordinates the response activities of others back to the premise. However, most of the alarms transmitted are false, which results in the false dispatching of police, fire, and medical teams on a large scale. This creates numerous problems for public response agencies, endangers public safety, and increases costs to consumers and industry providers.

Various industry studies have determined that the source of these false dispatches are caused by the user of the system more than 75 % of the time - user error. Much of the user error occurs when the user is actively operating their system; that is, is turning the system on or off. When turning the system on such users are generally exiting the premise and are activating the system to protect the premise in their absence. Likewise, if the user is turning the system off this generally occurs when the user is returning to the premise. As a result, much of the user errors occur when users are coming or going from their premise.

In order to mitigate the number of false dispatches, an accepted standard process in the industry has been to verify the alarm by attempting to contact the alarm users by telephone at the premise before dispatching a response agency. In such an instance, if the users are arriving at the premise, there is a chance of reaching them. However, most of the time, the users are unavailable because (a) they have just exited the premise - (which accounts for about 50 % of the occurrences) or (b) the telephone line to the premise is busy - (some additional percent of the occurrences). When the user is unavailable, then the emergency agency, usually a police department, is dispatched to the premise. False alarms are such a wide scale problem that many police departments are considering a no-response policy to electronic security systems, and indeed, some police departments in major cities have already implemented such a policy. Other departments are charging for response and many cities have instituted fines for multiple false alarms. If this trend continues, security alarm systems will become more expensive (through the use of private guard response or large fines) which will reduce the number of buyers who can afford or are willing to pay the costs that might be associated with these security systems. This will significantly impact the industry in a negative way and would be unfortunate to the public because security systems do reduce risk of loss and add safety to the persons they protect—not to mention the many thieves that have been captured because of these systems.

What is needed in the art is a system to reduce the number of false dispatches so that police departments do not continue to take action against the industry and the owners of security systems. The system should be easy to use and should provide a user with the ability to cancel false alarms quickly. In the security alarm industry, the method used to transmit alarm signals to the central station is a modem system over a standard land-based telephone line. A land-based telephone line may present an opportunity for a thief to easily tamper with the operation of the alarm in attempting to defeat a detection system and gain access to the premise.

As a result, various wireless systems have been proposed to protect the transmission. Although these wireless systems have been used as a secondary backup, in some instances, they have been used for primary alarm transmission. However, these methods are all quite expensive and so less than an estimated 2% of detection systems currently use a wireless transmission of signals to the central station.

Thus, what is needed are systems and methods to enhance the use of wireless transmission in detection systems.

In the security alarm industry, the user interacts with the alarm system through a device known as a keypad. This keypad is generally wired directly to the system, can be accessed over a phone line or is available in a short range wireless version. None of these designs allow the user to roam broadly and the only truly long range design - the telephone line connection - does not provide for messages to user that are initiated by the system, instead the user must independently call into the system to retrieve messages or interact with the system.

Thus, what is needed are systems and methods to enhance the user's ability to roam broadly yet still in communication with the alarm system. Personal communication systems have been proposed for emergency call systems to alert others to an emergency. One application of an emergency call system is for summoning help in a medical emergency. One attempt at an emergency call system is the use of a telephone and the emergency number "911" . Some of the drawbacks of this system include the requirement for dialing and communicating the emergency to a 911 dispatcher. These factors can be significant in the case of a person who is in imminent danger or is substantially incapacitated. For example, the process of accessing a phone, dialing a number, and communicating a need is not practical if a person is the subject of a hold-up or medical emergency — like stroke or heart attack.

Another attempt at an emergency call system is a wired on-site security system with connection to an actuation device, such as a push button. When the button is activated, the device communicates the activation to the security system either via wire or short range radio-link, such as a premises based system, generally providing a range of 1000 feet or less. Next, the on-site security system passes the message to a central monitoring station or response agency, usually via a dial-up modem or dedicated radio transmitter. The response agency generally consists of a staffed center that receives data, processes it on a computer and takes action based upon previously received instructions related to the conditions involved.

There are several disadvantages with this overall design. For example, the system is expensive, requires professional installation, and requires separate and proper connection to a phone line or other means of transmission to assure operation at the time of an emergency. Other disadvantages include: the system requires connection to a permanent power supply, even if it has battery backup; false alarms are difficult to prevent because the alarm is often silent so the user is unaware of accidental activation; and testing is difficult to manage and is labor intensive because it requires coordinating the response agency and the user and is not an automated process for the response agency. One application of emergency call devices is for medically at risk or infirm persons. The existing system designs fail to incorporate solutions to many problems relative to the application of medical monitoring, including but not limited to, daily communication with the user to verify that they are well and to verify that they are taking their medication. This process is currently being done in a labor intensive, personal telephone call method.

What is needed in the art is a personal communication system useful for, among other things, an emergency communication system and one that also solves the foregoing problems. It should be able to be self-installed to lower cost and increase availability. The system should be easy to use and incorporate features that allow for automatic testing, reduce false alarms, and manage one or more aspects of patient care.

The provision of a security alarm detection system generally requires several components and a rather complex installation. Consequently, most detection systems require professional installation and setup.

Some of the current designs try to integrate many or all of the components and devices in a single enclosure or case. However, much of the complexity and cost remains since most of the devices and components are still in use.

Occasionally a detection system actuates automatic systems such as fire suppression or equipment shutdown, but in order for a detection system to be effective it usually must summon help. One approach for summoning help is to annunciate a local alarm that attracts attention. Another is to use a recorded message that is called to a list of phone numbers. Yet another is to use a professional central station monitoring service that receives data signals from the premise. As alarms, false alarms, and the indifference of neighbors increases, voluntary response to an alarm sound has virtually vanished. Hence local alarm annunciation is ineffective for garnering assistance. Indeed, the sound of an alarm has come to be perceived more as a nuisance and annoyance than a cause for attention. In a similar fashion, recorded messages are outlawed in a large number of 911 emergency dispatch centers and counting on reaching someone at home is not reliable. In addition, false alarms make recorded messages an irritation, especially since they are designed to repeat. So recorded messages are likewise considered ineffective. This leaves the use of a professional monitoring service that is inherently expensive and so many properties are left completely unprotected.

As a result, very low market penetration exists for reasons associated with current design. These include, but are not limited to, the requirement for professional design, the requirement for professional installation, and the requirement for professional monitoring. These three reasons make even so called "do-it-yourself" systems relatively poor sellers and even several major consumer electronic companies such as Magnavox, Zenith, Radio Shack and others have had little success or outright failure with an over the counter, table-top type product.

Furthermore, for correct installation of a standard security system to a telephone network, some tabletop models require a special phone jack (RJ-31X) installed at the correct location (before any premise equipment is connected to the line) to assure the availability of the phone line. This may require installation by a telephone company or other professional. In addition, services on the user's line can interfere with successful alarm transmission, with touch tone service, call waiting, and in the future, Digital Subscriber Line services will make the connection even more complex.

A related problem is found in the user's interface with the detection system. In a typical system, the user interacts with the detection system through a device generally known as a keypad. The current keypad designs do not allow the user to roam broadly and one long-range design - the telephone line connection - does not provide for messages to user that are initiated by the system, instead the user independently calls into the system to retrieve messages or interact with the system. Although some alarm systems in use today can initiate a page to a person's pager, this still does not allow the user to exercise command and control functions in return. There is no single device that allows long-range, bi-directional communication and control of an alarm system. What is needed in the art is an improved detection system that is friendly to a mobile user, that is easy to install, that is truly portable, and that is inexpensive, without the high costs associated with professional design, expert installation, and monitoring services.

Summary The above-mentioned problems with the use of wireless transmission systems as well as other problems are addressed by the present invention and will be understood by reading and studying the following specification. Systems and methods are described which enhance the use of wireless transmission in detection systems.

The present system provides notification to users of a security system of a detected alarm condition. In one embodiment, this notification is performed simultaneously or nearly simultaneously with the central station. In one embodiment, the notification is performed using a wide scale wireless system so that the users can be notified regardless of their current location.

Such a system solves many of the previously stated problems and several others not mentioned herein. In one embodiment, the user is signaled using a wireless system, so if the user is leaving the premise, and perhaps at a significant distance, the user will still be notified. In one embodiment, the system connects the users of the security system directly to the central station system so that the alarm can be immediately verified or canceled with the central station. In the embodiment where the connection is wireless, the user or users may be in any location within the range of the wireless network. If the central station receives a cancellation of the alarm they can avoid dispatching the emergency agency or perhaps recall them if the dispatch has occurred.

In one embodiment the system provides a dynamic response process that is adjusted in real time or nearly instantaneously by the users of the system. That is to say, more than half of all false alarms may be canceled and more than half of all false dispatches can probably be avoided.

In one embodiment, the system provides nearly simultaneous and wireless connection of electromechanical data from a security or other detection system, remote human intervention (usually the users of the detection system), and the response centers to provide direction to a response effort. One aspect of this design is that the users of the detection system participate in directing the response effort indicated by various alarms from a security or other detection system.

Due to cost, power requirements, and relative design sizes, one embodiment of the system incorporates Narrowband PCS systems, otherwise known as 2-Way paging. Other embodiments include, but are not limited to, PCS, cellular, cellemetry and other broad scale wireless networks. Other embodiments incorporate combinations of these networks.

One illustrative embodiment includes an exemplary system that comprises an alarm panel to provide an alarm signal. The system also comprises at least one look-up table (first look-up table) to encode the alarm signal as one of a plurality of event types into a message. The message includes a code for each event type and a destination string.

In another illustrative embodiment, the exemplary system further comprises a network to pass the message of the first look-up table. The system also comprises a second look-up table to decode the destination string of the message to determine a decoded destination of the message. The network passes the message to the decoded destination of the message. In another illustrative embodiment, the exemplary system further comprises a central station to receive the message from the network. The system further comprises a third lookup table to decode the code of the first look-up table. The third look-up table produces a security code from the code of the first look-up table.

In another illustrative embodiment, an exemplary method comprises reading an alarm bus by a transmitter for at least one alarm signal. The method further comprises encoding the alarm signal into a message by looking up at least one table that is stored on the transmitter. The act of encoding includes encoding the alarm signal into a code representing one of the plurality of event types into the message. The act of encoding includes encoding a destination string into the message. In another illustrative embodiment, the method further comprises decoding the destination string to determine the destination of the message. The method further comprises decoding the code representing one of the plurality of event types into a security code.

In another illustrative embodiment, an exemplary data structure is described. The data structure includes an event identifier to identify an occurrence of an alarm event, and an event descriptor to describe the alarm event in at least one detail.

An illustrative embodiment includes a system that comprises a detection system to provide an alarm signal when the detection system detects at least one alarm event at a location of interest. The alarm signal is encoded into a message. The system further comprises a bi-directional device to provide a control signal to control the detection system. The control signal is encoded into a second message. The bi-directional pager is receptive to the first message from the detection system.

An illustrative method comprises detecting an alarm event, encoding the alarm event into a message. The act of encoding further encodes a destination string into the message. The method further comprises transmitting the message to a network, and decoding the message so as to alert the first bi-directional device that the alarm event has been detected. The personal communication system described in this application addresses the foregoing problems and others not expressly stated in this detailed description. In one embodiment, a personal communication system including a two way pager or other two-way, long-range, communication device is used in conjunction with a response agency to coordinate a request by a user for assistance. In one application, the system is used for patients to report an emergency and to coordinate assistance efforts by the response agency.

In one embodiment, the system uses existing communication systems and communications protocols adapted to communicate requests and information to the response agency. In one embodiment, the system uses modified two way pagers adapted for easy activation in the event of an emergency situation. In one embodiment, the two way pagers are adapted for providing information to coordinate rescue or emergency aid dispatch. In one embodiment, when the emergency help button(s) on the device is pushed, the device transmits a call for help to a responding agency. The responding agency coordinates assistance to a predetermined location, like a person's home or place of business. In one embodiment, the response agency receives a geoposition and coordinates help to that location.

In one embodiment the device has messages transmitted to it notifying the user of various "conditions." Such conditions may include information about circumstances, events, and/or situations for assisting the user. Using one embodiment of the present system, the user is able to acknowledge and respond accordingly to these messages. For example, these messages can indicate conditions such as "test", "medication reminder" or "is everything OK?" . These messages can be automatically generated by the messaging automation system and the acknowledgments automatically processed or they can be manually generated and processed.

In one embodiment, the detection system provides, among other things, a personal control panel and a portable detection unit which may be used independently or with a bi- directional communications network for short range and long range control panel and alarm monitoring and control functions. Several variations are provided including cellular, paging, satellite, narrowband PCS, narrowband trunked radio, and other communications systems with conventional and nonconventional protocols. In one embodiment, the present detection system provides, among other things, the replacement of any or all of the user interface, transmission system, and control panel as listed above, through the use of a long-range, two-way, wireless communication device such as a two-way pager. Accordingly, a person who owns a two-way pager or related device, may, for a much lower cost than is customary, own a detection system by incorporating only an additional paging/detection device as described herein. This embodiment of the system has the advantages, including, but not limited to, simple installation, reliable and secure built- in signal transmission, long range wireless user interface and long range system status annunciation. Currently, many detection systems communicate with a central station that manages the response function. However, this embodiment of the present system offers yet another advantage by communicating direct to the system owner who may then select the desired response. In one embodiment, the direct communications are optional so that the owner may select the central station approach or the direct approach without the services of a central station. Thus, the present system provides, among other things, instant and affordable protection for a wide variety of applications such as construction sites, vehicles, motel rooms, apartments, and small residential and commercial properties.

Furthermore, in one embodiment, the system incorporates low power components to provide the additional advantage of being able to operate solely on battery power for extended periods of time and not just as an emergency /temporary backup.

Thus, the present system, in various embodiments, offers advantages over a standard detection system which include, but are not limited to: low cost; easy, instantaneous installation by an ordinary consumer; reliable communications without connection to or interruption of the site telephone lines; long range control by the user; long range communication of alarm conditions and other signals to a user; long range wireless communication to a central station included instead of as an option; no requirement for connecting to a central station with its attendant monthly costs, if the user desires to monitor their system themselves; and, no need for a permanent power supply. Thus, the system and its various embodiments offers a portable detection system that can provide protection for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, homes and businesses, and to applications without power or phone lines like vehicles and construction sites. These and other embodiments, aspects, advantages, and features of the present invention will be set forth in part in the description which follows, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art by reference to the following description of the invention and drawings or by practice of the invention.

Brief Description of the Drawings

Figure 1 depicts the communication paths between the security system, the system user(s), and the central station according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 2 depicts the encoding and decoding of burst messages on a NPCS network, according to one embodiment of the present system. Figure 3 depicts the transmission of the verification information from the user to the central station according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 4 is a table that depicts an encoding process according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 5 is a block diagram illustrating a system in accordance with one embodiment. Figure 6 is a process diagram illustrating a method in accordance with one embodiment.

Figure 7 is a structure diagram illustrating a data structure in accordance with one embodiment.

Figure 8 is a table illustrating a destination string in accordance with one embodiment. Figure 9 is a process diagram illustrating a method in accordance with one embodiment.

Figure 10 is a process diagram illustrating a method in accordance with one embodiment.

Figure 11 is a structure diagram illustrating a data structure in accordance with one embodiment. Figure 12 is a block diagram showing signal transmission of an emergency call signal sent by the user, according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 13 is a block diagram depicting operation of the emergency call process, according to one embodiment of the present system. Figure 14 is a block diagram depicting automated testing of the device to verify its operation, according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 15 is a block diagram depicting a means of enhancing the service for medical customers relative to reminders to take their medication, perform other service, verify conditions, and checks on their wellness, according to one embodiment of the present system. Figure 16 is a diagram showing an application of the present communication system in an "Assisted Living Response Center."

Figure 17 is a diagram demonstrating operation of a personal control panel and portable detection unit according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 18 is a block diagram of a portable detector unit according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 19 A is a block diagram of a communications module according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 19B is a block diagram of a communications module according to one embodiment of the present system. Figure 19C is a block diagram of a communications module according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 20 is a block diagram of a personal control panel according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 21 is a diagram showing various communication modes of different components of one detection system according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 22 is a diagram showing a user controlling their detection system from a distance, according to one embodiment of the present system.

Figure 23 is a block diagram showing the components of a basic security system, according to one embodiment of the present system. Detailed Description This detailed description provides a number of different embodiments of the present system. The embodiments provided herein are not intended in an exclusive or limited sense, and variations may exist in organization, dimension, hardware, software, mechanical design and configuration without departing from the claimed invention, the scope of which is provided by the attached claims and equivalents thereof.

Detection System. Network. User Device, and Central Station

The present detection system provides many benefits, including, but not limited to, reduction of false alarms and false dispatches. The present detection system provides a user with the ability to cancel false alarms quickly and is straightforward to use. Many other benefits will be appreciated by those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the present description. Furthermore, U.S. provisional patent application ser. no. 60/098,270 filed August 28, 1998 is incorporated by reference in its entirety. The present system provides notification to users of a security system of a detected alarm condition. In one embodiment, this notification is performed simultaneously or nearly simultaneously with the central station. In one embodiment, the notification is performed using a wide scale wireless system so that the users can be notified regardless of their current location. In one embodiment, the user is signaled using a wireless system, so if the user is leaving the premise, and perhaps at a significant distance, the user will still be notified. In one embodiment, the system connects the users of the security system directly to the central station system so that the alarm can be immediately verified or canceled with the central station. In the embodiment where the connection is wireless, the user or users may be in any location within the range of the wireless network. If the central station receives a cancellation of the alarm they can avoid dispatching the emergency agency or perhaps recall them if the dispatch has occurred.

In one embodiment the system provides a dynamic response process that is adjusted in real time or nearly instantaneously by the users of the system. That is to say, more than half of all false alarms may be canceled and more than half of all false dispatches can probably be avoided.

In one embodiment, the system provides nearly simultaneous and wireless connection of electromechanical data from a security or other detection system, remote human intervention (usually the users of the detection system), and the response centers to provide direction to a response effort. One aspect of this design is that the users of the detection system participate in directing the response effort indicated by various alarms from a security or other detection system.

Due to cost, power requirements, and relative design sizes, one embodiment of the system incorporates Narrowband PCS systems, otherwise known as 2-Way paging. Other embodiments include, but are not limited to, PCS, cellular, cellemetry and other broad scale wireless networks. Other embodiments incorporate combinations of these networks.

Capcodes: In one embodiment using NPCS (Narrowband PCS) as the wireless transmission method, pager capcodes identify the individual user and the detection system that is transmitting the message. Capcodes are the addresses used to identify individual addresses - there is a unique capcode for each pager or common pager address, and common addressing - pagers can hold more than one capcode for broadcast messaging. For example, capcode 978654903 may uniquely indicate Joe Smith's pager while another capcode may also reside on Joe Smith's pager for broadcast receipt of the news or weather. In one embodiment one or more capcodes may be used to uniquely identify one or more central stations. Communication Paths: Figure 1 shows one embodiment of the present detection system in which an alarm system 10 provides a signal to a central station 20. In this embodiment, the users 30 are notified of the alarm condition via a wireless means in order to provide the highest assurance of contact. Otherwise by using a standard land line telephone, it may not be possible to find the user. This wireless system is depicted as Path A in Figure 1. In this embodiment, the central station 20 receives its verification information back from the user 30 having personal communication device 40 via wireless so that notification comes rapidly from wherever the user is located, otherwise the dispatch process will continue without an opportunity for intervention from the users 30. This is depicted as Path C in Figure 1. If Path A is selected instead of Path D, then in one embodiment a method of transmitting Path B is by a wireless technology matching Path A. This allows for the messaging to arrive at similar times at both the remote users 30 and the central station 20. As a result, the dispatch process has a good chance of starting in a synchronized fashion for both the central station 20 and the users 30. This will lead to a better coordinated effort. In one embodiment, the personal communication device 40 is a two-way pager. In one embodiment, the personal communication device 40 is a cellular phone. Other personal communication devices 40 may be used without departing from the present system.

Rapid Data Transmission: It is important that the data is received rapidly both to enhance protection and to help to provide rapid verification in order to cancel alarms. The transmission of data in this embodiment is done in a rapid burst method. One reason for this is as follows: As available in NPCS transmissions, for example with FLEX 25, REFLEX 25, or REFLEX 50 (communications protocols by MOTOROLA CORPORATION) - one of the protocols currently available for NPCS services - there is a short message availability (11 bit) that allows for very rapid transmission. In cellular there is a technology called cellemetry that accomplishes a similar function. This short and rapid messaging is a feature of many large scale wireless networks. The short message is typically available to be sent immediately and rapidly. For example, in FLEX 25, longer messages require time to set up transmission frames. By using a short form transmission, as much as 20 seconds or more may be saved in the transmission time requirement. This delay is of serious consequence because in at least one application - the security industry - life and property may be in peril. In addition, delays make it difficult to coordinate the rapidly proceeding dispatch between the central station 20 and the users 30. However, the short message has constraints of its own: it is a short message. Therefore, in one embodiment using FLEX 25, the message is encoded. One solution for encoding is presented later. Hence, in this embodiment a short predetermined digitally encoded message is transmitted from the alarm system 10 to the central station 20 and to the personal communication device 40 carried by remote users 30. In one embodiment, at the central station 20 a look up table is employed to decode the message. Additionally, in one embodiment, a look up table is employed by the remote user device 40 to decode the message. Message Decoding in the Network: Usually transmission networks are designed to receive a message and transport it to a destination. The network doesn't "read" the message or "act" on it except to read an address and send it to the destination. However, as networks become imbued with enhanced computing capability, they can read more of the message and process far beyond mere transport.

Therefore, as an alternative embodiment, the look up table can reside in the network and the message can be decoded by the network before it is delivered to any destination. This is a good way for delivering a message to the users 30. The encoded short form message is decoded in the network and a user 30 is delivered an English (or other language) language message according to the interpretation or look up table.

The effect is that an encoded short form message that looks like "00101000111" can be decoded in the network and read out, for example, "Burglary Area 4" on a device 40, such as a pager. The same numeric message can be decoded after receipt in a more sophisticated user device 40 or after receipt at the central station 20. Communication with the User: One embodiment of this design uses a single two way wireless device 40 carried by the users 30 instead of one device to receive the message and another to transmit the verification information to the central station 20. This saves cost and simplifies design. However, two separate devices 40 could be used.

The notification of the remote users 30 can be accomplished simultaneously with the central station 20 or instantly relayed by the central station 20 or any other relay point. Either process has an identical effect of creating nearly simultaneous notification of an alarm condition to the users 30 and the central station 20.

Information relative to verification, dispatch cancellation or other instructions, sent from the users to the central station 20 can be received as data that is automatically integrated into the automation system at the central station 20.

However, in other embodiments, manual processing of the data or other messages can be done.

Because the user information comes from a different device (different capcode when using NPCS) than the security alarm report from the users' security system, the information must be integrated in the central station automation system as related information from discrete sources. Existing methods used for integrating multiple security systems reporting from a single premise can be used to integrate these multiple sources of information. These methods vary between various automation systems, but the effective result is the same and can be used to a new benefit. Again, in one embodiment, the transmission of data can be done in a rapid burst method. In this process, a short predetermined digitally encoded message is transmitted to the central station 20 from the user device 40.

Alternatively, longer messages can be employed, but they may take longer to be received. At the central station 20 a look up table is employed to decode the message. As before, alternatively, the look up table can reside in the network and the message can be decoded by the network before it is delivered to any destination. The central station 20 can receive instructions not to dispatch an emergency agency or other instructions regarding a pending or processing dispatch. In the event that NPCS is the selected wireless transmission method, a standard two way pager using "response paging" can be used as the response device 40 carried by the user

30 to provide direction to the central station 20, in one embodiment.

In this design option a response message can either be presaved on the two way pager or can be transmitted to the pager. Since time is important, a presaved response message is a fast solution since it does not require any additional transmission time.

Other embodiments incorporating custom designed devices and devices using other wireless technologies can also be used to accomplish the same effect.

Encoding: In one embodiment, encoding is a straightforward process. The following encoding example is offered for the use with NPCS FLEX 25 or REFLEX 25 two way pager wireless services.

In Flex 25 an 11 bit message (an 11 bit message is eleven zeros or ones) is available for a short form transmission. This message is then split into registry sections for the purpose of sending a message. The table in Figure 4 describes sample registers and their potential purpose. As a result a message like "001/0111/0101" (slashes indicate breaks in the register of the look up table and are not transmitted) can be interpreted to mean: send a message to Joe

Smith's pager capcode 957843756 reading "Fire area 5" and send a message "001/0111/0101" to Central Station A and send "001/0111/0101" to Central Station B if Central Station A is not receiving. The above register size, order, and meaning can be changed to meet the needs of individual network designs. However, the purpose and use remains unchanged. Similar encoding registers can be used in any wireless transmission short form format.

Examples: One embodiment of the present system is provided in Figure 2. The detection system generates codes, data, or other type of input 210. In one embodiment, a look up table in the detection system or transmission device selects destination codes and encodes short messages 220. The encoded short message is burst into the network 230.

The network decodes destination codes with look up table and passes messages 240. If the destination code is a user code, then the message is transmitted via a long range wireless network 250. The message is decoded by the network for display on a pager or decoded in the user device 260. If the destination code indicates a central station, then the message is transmitted via long range wireless network 270 and the encoded message is received and decoded at the central station 280.

In Figure 3, transmissions from a remote user to a central station are shown. In one embodiment, a presaved message is selected or entered using verification information 310 and optionally it is converted to an encoded burst transmission 320. The information is transmitted via a long range wireless network 330 and decoded at the central station destination 340.

Signal Transmission from Detection System to Central Station The embodiments herein describe the use of narrow-band personal communication system (NPCS) for the transmission of alarm signals. NPCS is a technology used for pagers, especially for two-way pagers. The described embodiments are compatible with both FLEX and ReFLEX protocols. The described embodiments use technologies that are cost effective - both hardware and transmission services - when compared with other large wireless networks. The described embodiments use interpretation tables to emulate standard industry formats for delivery of message to Central Station automation system.

Detection systems may continue to send long alarm messages via land-based modems. Wireless systems have been added to create an inexpensive redundancy in order to ensure that critical alarm messages get to the intended destination should land-based modems fail. Simplicity is important in these wireless systems. A message using numeric codes or textual language to send a message such as "Memorial Hospital, Fire, smoke detection device, device #39, north wing, fourth floor" might be shortened to a message using three numeric codes meaning "Memorial Hospital, Fire, area 4". In one embodiment, if the land-based message were lost, a long wireless message would still allow the dispatching of a fire team. In another embodiment, if a detailed land-based message were lost, a shortened wireless message would still alert the fire team.

Figure 5 is a block diagram illustrating a system in accordance with one embodiment. The system 500 includes a detection system 502. The detection system 502 includes an alarm panel 508. The alarm panel 508 generates an alarm signal when the detection system 502 detects an alarm event.

The detection system 502 includes a transmitter 510. The transmitter 510 is compatible with either FLEX or ReFLEX protocol. The transmitter 510 receives from the alarm panel 108 the alarm signal. Before transmitting the alarm signal, the transmitter 510 encodes the alarm signal into a message by using at least one look-up table 512. This translation of alarm signals within the detection 502 creates a universal interface for various alarm systems. The look-up table 512 encodes the alarm signal into a code. The code is one among a group of event types that can be encoded. Each event type signifies an alarm event, such as a fire or a burglary. The look-up table 512 also can optionally encode a destination string into the message. In one embodiment, the destination string includes a primary destination and a secondary destination, or additional destinations. The primary destination is the destination of choice for the message to be sent to. If the message cannot be sent to the primary destination, then the message will be sent to the secondary destination, or to the additional destinations. In another embodiment, the destination string can be used to store other information instead of or in addition to destination information. After encoding, the transmitter 510 sends the message to a network 504. The network 504 is compatible with either FLEX or ReFLEX protocol. The network 504 decodes the message to obtain a destination address to send the rest of the message. To decode the message, the network 504 uses a look-up table 514. The look-up table 514 decodes just the destination portion of the message to obtain the destination to send the rest of the message. The network 504 sends the message to a central station 506. The central station 506 includes a personal computer 518. The personal computer 518 receives the message and decodes it. The personal computer 518 may use a look-up table 520 to decode the message. The look-up table 520 decodes the message and formats it into a security code. In one embodiment, such security code is compatible with industry standards, such as SIA, Ademco Contact ID, 4+2, etc. Once the security code is obtained, the personal computer passes the code on to the automation system 516 of the central station 506.

Figure 6 is a process diagram illustrating a method in accordance with one embodiment. The process 600 begins at block 602 by reading an alarm bus to detect at least one alarm signal. In one embodiment, a transmitter reads the alarm bus. Once an alarm signal is read, block 604 encodes the alarm signal into a message by using a look-up table. In one embodiment, the transmitter stores the look-up table. The message includes a code to determine an alarm event type from among a set of event types. The message also can optionally include a destination string so that a network may decode such destination string and determine where to send the message. If there are multiple alarm signals on the bus, block 606 classifies among the multiple alarm signals and prioritizes them. The higher priority alarm signal will get encoded first.

Once a message appears on a network, the network may decode the message at block 608. The network may decode just the destination portion of the message to determine where to send the message. Once the network has determined the destination of the central station that is to receive the message, the network sends the message to that central station. The central station may decode the message again to obtain the security code. These decoding activities are accomplished through using at least one look-up table. Once the central station has decoded the security code, it passes the code to an automation system.

Figure 7 is a structure diagram illustrating a data structure in accordance with one embodiment. The data structure 700 contains a message to be wirelessly transmitted using a narrow-band personal communication system. The data structure 700 can be formatted to be compatible with either FLEX or ReFLEX protocol. The data structure 700 includes a location identifier 702. The location identifier 702 identifies a location of interest that includes a premise such as a hospital or a residence. The location of interest is understood to mean the inclusion of the address of the premise where the alarm event has occurred. The event identifier 704 identifies the alarm event that gives rise to the alarm. The event descriptor 706 describes the alarm event in detail, such as the location on the premise where the fire is located. The destination string 708 identifies the destination of the central station that is to receive the message. The destination string 708 may contain at least one alternate central station if the message cannot be sent to the intended central station.

In the data structure 700, the destination string 308 and the location identifier 702 may be optionally included. The contents of the destination string 308 and the location identifier 702 may be transmitted separately, in one embodiment. In another embodiment, the contents of the destination string 708 and the location identifier 702 may be transmitted using existing transmission means of the FLEX or ReFLEX protocol. In another embodiment, the destination string 708 and the location identifier 702 can be used to send other information that is predetermined by the user or customer of the detection system.

Figure 8 is a table illustrating a destination string in accordance with one embodiment. The table 800 discusses the possible configuration of the 11 bit Flex 25 destination format that can be used in the various embodiments described heretofore.

Table 800 illustrates the Destination Code. The message needs to have a destination so that the network knows where to pass it. One encoding example is the use of NPCS Flex 25 two-way pager wireless services. In Flex 25 an 11 bit string (an 11 bit string is eleven zeros or ones) is available for a burst transmission. This message is then split into registry sections for the purpose of sending a message. Table 800 also illustrates Back up and

Alternative Code. These are important when sending critical messages like those used in the security industry to protect life and property.

For illustrative purposes only, a string may look like "001/0111/0101." The slashes indicate breaks in the register of the look up table and are not transmitted. This string can be interpreted to mean the following: send the message to Central Station A and send another message to Central Station B if Central Station A is not receiving.

The register size, order, and meaning of the 11 bit string can be changed to meet the needs of individual network designs. However, the purpose and use remains unchanged. Similar encoding registers can be used in any wireless transmission short bursting format. An alarm message should contain premise or customer identification. When using

NPCS (Narrowband PCS) as the wireless transmission method, pager capcodes (capcodes are the addresses used to identify individual addresses - there is a unique capcode for each pager or common pager address, and common addressing - pagers can hold more than one capcode for broadcast messaging) identify the individual user and the detection system that is transmitting the message. For example, capcode 978654903 may uniquely indicate Joe Smith's pager while another capcode may also reside on Joe Smith's pager for broadcast receipt of the news or weather. In one embodiment, the capcode is passed by the NPCS network and becomes a serial number or account number that acts as the premise or customer identification. The message should also contain the type of signal and signal information. The alarm data is available to be read on the processing bus of the alarm panel. Most alarm panel manufacturers have an output port or could easily provide one. This could be an asynchronous port or an RS232 port or some other standard computer protocol port. The NPCS transmission device could apply the use of a matching input port or an adapter between ports. Alternatively, simple voltage triggers could be provided by alarm manufacturers to indicate conditions such as "fire" and "burglary".

In one embodiment, the NPCS transmitter may be able to read the activity of the alarm panel bus. When it detects various signal transmission types it may read them and translate them according to a look up table stored in the transmitter. The lookup table will be developed specifically for each alarm manufacturer. If multiple messages are read, the look up table establishes priority of messaging according to the order arrangement of the table.

This translation will take potentially long and complex messages and translate them in a common type of signal and signal information code. This creates a common "language" so that all of the various codes indicating "fire" on various manufacturers' systems are translated in a universal code for "fire" on the NPCS transmission network. This makes the use of a simple interface device possible at the central station, because the central station does not have to interpret messages from a large number of sources - only one message type is sent and received.

Message receipt and decoding at the central station can be accomplished by various embodiments. In one embodiment, the message is received at the central station through an interface to the NPCS network. This could be a wireless transceiver, a frame connection, standard modem, internet connection or other connection suitable to the data stream volume. In another embodiment, the message is received at the central station into a standard personal computer for preliminary processing. In another embodiment, the central station's look up table is employed to decode the message (The effect is that an encoded message that looks like "0010100" can be decoded and read out "Burglary Area 4" at the central station.) In one embodiment, as the message is decoded, it is translated into standard security industry formats such as SIA, Ademco Contact ID, 4+2 or other formats. This allows for an easy acceptance into the central station system through a standard device. In another embodiment, the message is passed from the personal computer into the automation system of the central station.

In another embodiment, the messaging may use standard acknowledgement response to be handled in the network. This is an ordinary computer messaging process that provides error checking and receipt acknowledgment between devices. Figure 9 is a process diagram illustrating a method in accordance with one embodiment. The process 900 illustrates signal transmission of a detection signal from a detection system to a central station.

Thus, the invention described in the various embodiments has many benefits. It is based on low cost wireless technology. It can be easily and inexpensively connected to a detection system. It can be easily and inexpensively connected to a central station. The interface to connect the described invention is not complicated and can be developed by manufacturers of detection systems. Because of its economy and ease of use, it is likely that the invention will enjoy broad adoption by the marketplace.

Signal Transmission from Detection System to Remote Users A remote user may use a bi-directional pager or an adapted 2-way pager as an interface device to control their security system. This approach replaces the function of a keypad in the security system. Using a bi-directional pager, optional system control messages can be preprogrammed into the pager for control of the security system. Figure 10 is a process diagram showing a method in accordance with one embodiment. The process 1000 shows the signal transmission from the detection system to a remote user device.

The arrangement may include the following features: (1) the use of NPCS (two way paging) for communicating the control messages of a security system; (2) the use of a standard two way response pager as a user interface with a security system; (3) the use of any other adapted or custom made device that uses one or both of the previous two technologies; (4) this provides long range totally wireless solution. There are combination arrangements such as cell phone to telephone line; (5) also unique in a security application for remote user interface is a long range solution of any type where the control system can contact the user interface. All other long range user interface connections must be initiated by the user - the system has not had the ability to initiate a two way session; (6) the creation of a single device that has long range, bi-directional, wireless capability that is simultaneous interactive with a detection system and the central station; (7) notifies the users of the security system of the detected alarm condition simultaneously with the central station. This is done in a wide scale wireless fashion so that the uses can be notified regardless of their current location.

When using NPCS (Narrowband PCS) as the wireless transmission method, pager capcodes (capcodes are the addresses used to identify individual addresses - there is a unique capcode for each pager or common pager address, and common addressing - pagers can hold more than one capcode for broadcast messaging) identify the individual user and the detection system that is transmitting the message. For example, capcode 978654903 may uniquely indicate Joe Smith's pager while another capcode may also reside on Joe Smith's pager for broadcast receipt of the news or weather.

When sending messages between the remote user device and the detection system, the transmission of data may be done in a rapid burst method (as available in NPCS transmissions, for example with FLEX 25 services there is a short message availability (11 bit) that allows for very rapid transmission. In cellular, there is a technology called cellmetry that accomplishes a similar function. This short and rapid messaging is a feature of most large scale wireless networks. The short message is typically available to be sent immediately and rapidly. For example, in FLEX 25, longer messages require time to set up transmission frames. By using a short burst transmission, as much as 20 seconds or more may be saved in the transmission time requirement. This delay is of serious consequence because in the security industry, life and property may be in peril. In addition, delays make it difficult to coordinate the rapidly proceeding dispatch between the central station and the users. However, the short message has constraints of its own: it is a short message. Therefore, the message must be encoded. This solution is presented later.) In this process, a short predetermined digitally encoded message is transmitted from the alarm system to the device carried by remote users.

A look up table can be employed by the remote user device to decode the message. Alternatively, the look up table can reside in the network and the message can be decoded by the network before it is delivered to any destination. This is a good way for delivering a message to the users. The encoded burst message is decoded in the network and a user is delivered an English (or other language) language message according to the interpretation or look up table. (See register information regarding messaging #4 below for more information. However, the effect is that an encoded burst message that looks like "00101000111" can be decoded in the network and read out "Burglary Area 4" on a pager. The same numeric message can be decoded after receipt in a more sophisticated user device or after receipt at the central station.)

To send information from the remote user device back to the security system, the process discussed above can be used to send messages from the remote user device to the security system.

When NPCS is the selected wireless transmission method, a standard two way pager using response paging can be used as the remote user device carried by the user to provide interactive instructions to the security system.

A response message can either be presaved on the two way pager or can be transmitted to the pager. Since time is important, a presaved response message is the best solution since it does not require any additional transmission time.

The above embodiments do not limit the invention. Other embodiments may be used without departing from the present invention.

For illustrative purposes only, the following encoding example is offered for the use of NPCS Flex 25 two way pager wireless services. In Flex 25 an 11 bit message (an 11 bit message is eleven zeros or ones) is available for a burst transmission. This message is then split into registry sections for the purpose of sending a message. Figure 11 describes sample registers and their potential purpose. A message like "001/0111/0101" (slashes indicate breaks in the register of the look up table and are not transmitted) can be interpreted to mean: send a message to Joe Smith's pager capcode 957843756 reading "Fire area 5" and send a back up message to Mary Smith's pager if Joe didn't receive his message.

In one embodiment, the register size, order, and meaning can be changed to meet the needs of individual network designs. However, the purpose and use remains unchanged. Similar encoding registers can be used in any wireless transmission short bursting format.

Applications: Emergency Response. Medical Reminder, and Assisted Living

The embodiments described herein provide many benefits, including, but not limited to, easy set-up and installation, automatic testing, patient care and a reduction in false alarms. Many other benefits will be appreciated by those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the present description. Furthermore, U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/105,119 filed October 21, 1998 is incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Personal Emergency Communication System: In one embodiment of the present personal communication system, a two way, long range wireless communication device is used as an emergency notification device. In one embodiment, the two-way, long range wireless communication device is a two-way pager. In one embodiment a standard two-way pager is used. In one embodiment, the two-way pager may be adapted for specialized use as an emergency notification device. For example, the pager may be adapted for easy to activate buttons that are protected against accidental activation. In one example, the pager uses large buttons which are clearly marked and which are recessed to avoid accidental activation. Other types of adaptation include, for example, programming special features into the two way, long range wireless communication device. In some embodiments only programming adaptation is performed.

In embodiments including special function button(s), such as an emergency help button, activation is accomplished in several ways, including, but not limited to, pressing one or more buttons on the device. In one embodiment a standard two way pager is used wherein its programming is adapted to interpret that pressing a certain pair of buttons simultaneously initiates a call for help. Thus, the call for help is a special form of a message to be sent by the pager. In one embodiment, the communication device, such as a pager or electronics with pager technology, is placed in a special enclosure with physical connections to the help function buttons .

In one embodiment, when the special function button(s) is pushed, the device transmits a call for help to a responding agency. In one embodiment using NPCS (Narrowband PCS) as the wireless transmission method, pager capcodes identify the individual sender. (Capcodes are the addresses used to identify individual addresses - there is a unique capcode for each pager. There are also common capcodes or shared pager addresses. Pagers can hold more than one capcode. Shared capcodes are used for broadcast messaging for applications like sending the news or for group messaging as to a group of service personnel. For example, capcode 978654903 may uniquely indicate Joe Smith's pager while another capcode may also reside on Joe Smith's pager for broadcast receipt of the sports or weather. In this embodiment, the pager's program is set up to automatically send a digital message to a predetermined destination when the emergency call buttons have been activated. In one embodiment using a standard two-way pager with ReFLEX™ 25 or 50 technology, this would be a matter of loading a predetermined message either in the pager (in one embodiment this could be a "response message" in the case of two-way response enabled pagers and service) or in the network. When the emergency call was activated, a message containing its sending address (capcode) and a simple emergency code would be forwarded to the response agency.

Upon receiving the call for help, the responding agency coordinates assistance to a predetermined location related to the sender's capcode, like a person's home or place of business. In another embodiment, the device or the attached network determines a geoposition, transmits the current location with the call for help and then the response agency coordinates help to that location, whether it is a fixed or moving position.

In other embodiments the device has messages transmitted to it notifying the user of various conditions. The user acknowledges and responds accordingly to these messages. These messages can indicate conditions such as "test", "medication reminder" or "is everything OK?". In one embodiment, these messages are automatically generated by the messaging automation system at the response agency and the acknowledgments automatically processed as well. In the embodiment where the messaging and responses are automatically processed, responses that indicate a potential problem or the lack of responses are presented for action by the agency.

Due to cost, power requirements, and relative design sizes, one embodiment of this system incorporates Narrowband PCS systems, otherwise known as two-way paging. Other embodiments include, but are not limited to, PCS, cellular, cellemetry, and other broad scale wireless networks.

Figure 12 shows one embodiment of the present communication system. Users 12125 have a two-way communication device 12100 for communication with the response agency 12150. In one embodiment, communications are bi-directional. For example, users 12125 can send an emergency notification or other communication 12140 to response agency 12150. Response agency 12150 can respond to the user with an acknowledgement or an instruction or query 12160. Figure 12 shows User A 12125a communicating with the response agency 150, however, it is understood that all of the users may be in communication with the response agency 12150. In one embodiment, response agency 12150 is a central station which is equipped to handle various emergency notifications from the users 12125. One advantage of this type of system is that the user is aware that their request for help has been heard once they receive the acknowledgment. Furthermore, acknowledgments can be in different forms to provide the user the acknowledgment with an annunciator that is not readily observable by another person. For example, if the emergency notification signals a break-in situation by an intruder, the acknowledgement from the response agency may be a digital signal which is converted into a command for the two way communication device to vibrate, thus informing the user that the emergency notification was received, but not informing the intruder. The vibration may be accomplished using any vibrating means, including, but not limited to, vibrating systems known to those in the art. One skilled in the art will understand that several types of acknowledgments may be performed without departing from the present system. For example, a small light may be used. In one embodiment, the light may change color or blinking frequency to denote different signals from the response agency 12150. Additionally, sounds may be used. In one embodiment a digital display provides a message for the user to observe.

If the communication 12160 is a query, then User A 12125a may respond with a query response 12140. For example, an alphanumeric response may be generated by the user. A coded response may be used. A time dependent response may be used, for example, the user 12125 could be asked a series of different questions which require responses within a particular time interval, such as: "If you are experiencing difficulty in breathing, press your notification button now." One skilled in the art will readily recognize that several systems for responding to queries may be used without departing from the present system. Additionally, several types of interfaces may be used to provide different response options. In one embodiment, soft keys are provided which are modified for the situation. Other embodiments are possible and those mentioned herein are not intended to be exclusive or limiting. In one embodiment the two way communication device is a two way pager. In this embodiment, the two way pager serves as a long range communication device, since it uses the pre-existing communications infrastructure set up for the two way pager, the paging communication network. Thus, this embodiment is not a premises based embodiment and may operate where ever the paging communication network allows communications with the two way pager. In one embodiment, an existing two-way pager may be adapted to provide an easy to use interface for signaling to the response agency. In another embodiment, a specialized device using the two-way paging technology may be implemented. As stated earlier, various changes in structure or programming of the devices may be performed without departing from the present system. In another embodiment, a cellular telephone may be used to signal the emergency notification or other communication. In one embodiment, the cellular telephone is adapted to receive the acknowledgment and present it to the user. In one embodiment the acknowledgment is displayed on a display integral to the cellular telephone. Other embodiments are possible without departing from the present system. For some time, personal communication devices have been available. However, they have not been widely employed in an emergency call service function to date. Part of the reason is that the benefit of implementing a system as described herein has not been recognized. Additionally, special processing methods are required to implement the devices effectively in this service. Some methods that significantly improve use of wireless devices for emergency call service include the emergency call processing method for reducing false alarms and the automated testing method to assure functioning service.

Another set of methods that significantly enhance this service in its common application for medically at risk persons needing to be in an assisted living environment include methods for medical reminders and wellness checks. In various embodiments, these methods can be applied with or without the use of an emergency call service. All of these methods will be considered in turn.

Emergency Call Processing: In one embodiment, a system is provided which reduces the number of false alarms associated with emergency call devices and provides assurance to the user that their request for help has been heard. Without these capabilities, the system provides problematic user experiences, as one skilled in the art would readily recognize. Figure 13 shows one embodiment in which the user activates a call for help (A) through the device as described herein. Notification (B) is transmitted to the response agency. If response service is offered to a roaming user, that is, a user that does not expect service at a fixed premise, then the geoposition of the user would be determined (for instance, by a connected device or the network) and the position would be passed with the message. The response agency (C) receives the message and interprets it. The sending address (for example, in a paging network embodiment, this is a capcode as previously described) is looked up against a specific person or location. In embodiments where a geoposition is received the coordinates are cross referenced to identify the location. The condition being protected against is looked up, for example, medical, hold-up, assault, car failure, or other possible event. Once a person, probable condition and location are all available, then a response is coordinated. Different courses of action are are possible in various embodiments. One example of three possible courses of action are provided in the following paragraphs. In one embodiment, acknowledgment (D) of the emergency situation is sent to the user device. This acknowledgment can be a message, a page trip or other function. As stated earlier, in one embodiment the acknowledgment can be sent discreetly for silent alarm situations like hold-up or assault. For example, in one embodiment, a discreet acknowledgment consists of activating a vibrator in the device.

Some of the benefits derived from use of an acknowledgment which is returned to the user (E) include assurance to the user that help is on the way and to notify the user that they have activated the emergency call feature. Without this acknowledgment a very large number of false activations occur (as is presently found in these types of emergency call services). With the acknowledgment, the user can learn of an activation and call off the response of medical or police teams saving time, expense, fines and risk. In one embodiment, this cancellation can be sent by the user directly from their emergency call device.

In one embodiment, a special code or password is required to cancel assistance. The passcode is entered into the device. For example, passcodes may be entered by using numeric or other keys on a phone. In one embodiment incorporating a pager, a distinct order of pressing certain keys could provide the equivalent of a security code. For example, 3 short and 1 long on a certain key; or once on key 'a', once on key 'b', and once more on key 'a' . Duress passcodes may also be created. A duress code is one that is entered under duress of another, and the central response agency is aware of the situation.

When appropriate, emergency assistance (F) is requested by the response agency according the expected condition, for example medics/ambulance for medical conditions or police for hold-up conditions.

When appropriate, a call is attempted to the premise (G) to render further aid or learn more of the condition. In other embodiments, additional messages can be sent to the user for their reply or response.

Automated Testing: Testing provides a means for assuring the reliability of equipment and services. Regular testing increases the likelihood that something will function when it is needed. In embodiments where the function anticipated here involves the direct risk of life, testing is an important aspect of the service.

Currently, the testing process is relatively expensive. This is because the user must coordinate a test with the response agency, or the event will be treated as an emergency. Coordination at the response agency generally includes human assistance and hence expense. In addition, regardless of instructions and manuals pertaining to testing, the user often fails to self-initiate a test and soon lags into complacency regarding the importance of testing and hence ceases testing altogether. The present system solves these and other problems.

Figure 14 shows one embodiment of a testing process where the user is prompted to initiate a test (A). The prompt can be created in an automated fashion according to a predetermined schedule such as based on time of day, daily or weekly. This is a message or notification that appears on the user's device and prompts them to follow the test procedure. In one embodiment, the prompt to test is originated in the response center rather than in the device, in case the device has failed. In addition, when the prompt originates in the response center a full circle of communications is tested by the process.

The test procedure (B) may involve a simple test of the device that proves that it is functioning and communicating as expected. The test procedure could involve a special test button, actuation of the actual help button within a specified period of time, or simple acknowledgment of receipt of the message. The test or its acknowledgement (C) is received at the response center and interpreted according to the method used for interpreting other messages from the user.

Properly received tests can be automatically logged (D) by computers without any human intervention. Test problems or outright failure will be presented to the response personnel for further follow up. Medication Reminder: As previously discussed, one application of emergency devices is in a medical situation. These services often couple the emergency call system to a service of calling the user to verify that they are alive and well enough to respond or to remind them to take their medication or other action. Figure 4 shows one embodiment of a medical reminder application. In this example the patient is prompted to take medication or to verify their wellness. After taking the medication, the user acknowledges the prompt, confirming receipt of the prompt. If no response is received, the response agency 150 may take the appropriate action to check up on the patient or dispatch assistance.

In a similar fashion, other reminders can be provided. For example, to perform tests, verify conditions, call, visit, go, etc. Assisted Living Response Center: Figure 16 shows one application in which the present system can be implemented in an assisted living response center. In one embodiment, the two-way communications device is a pager system as provided herein, as shown in Figure 16. It is understood that other communication systems and other uses of the communications system may be performed without departing from the present system and that the examples in Figure 16 are not intended in an exclusive or limiting sense. The wellness check systems and emergency notification systems provided herein may be operated to ensure that patients requiring assistance receive that assistance from the response agency. The auto processing feature allows for programmed wellness checks, medication reminders, and other scheduled events without the intervention of personnel. If a wellness check fails or if an emergency notification is received, then personnel may be called to handle the situation.

An Enhanced Detection System: User Friendly. Easy Installation. Portable

The present system provides many benefits, including but not limited to, low cost, easy installation, limited power requirements and wireless operation and signal transmission. Many other benefits will be appreciated by those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the present description.

U.S. provisional patent application ser. no. 60/098,392, filed Aug. 29, 1998; U.S. provisional patent application ser. no. 60/098,270 filed Aug. 28, 1998; U.S. provisional patent application ser. no. 60/105,493 filed October 23, 1998; and U.S. provisional patent application ser. no 60/135,862 filed May, 25, 1999 are all hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

Figure 17 shows one example of a premises 1730, such as a house, garage, yard, warehouse, vehicle or any fixed, portable, or mobile location or structure intended for detection monitoring. A Portable Detection Unit 1720 ("PDU 1720") is located in or on the premises 1730 for detection or monitoring of one or more events or conditions. Detection of events and status of the PDU 1720 is communicated to Personal Control Panel 1710 ("PCP 1710"). PCP 1710 is shown "off premises" but may be used "on premises" as well. The PCP 1710 is useful for monitoring the condition of the PDU 1720 and for reception of detected events. PCP 1710 is also useful for, among other things, transmitting information to PDU 1720 for the purposes of either arming the PDU 1720, disarming PDU 1720, and/or canceling an alarm deemed false by the user of PCP 1710. In one embodiment, PCP 1710 and PDU 1720 communicate using a short range communication device which is dedicated for such communications and which also may include a limited range, such as approximately that of the premises. Other short range embodiments are possible without departing from the present system. In one embodiment, PCP 1710 and PDU 1720 communicate using a combination of short range communications and long range communications, depending on the distance of PCP 1710 from PDU 1720. In yet another embodiment, PCP 1710 and PDU 1720 communicate using a long range communication system, even if the communications are conducted in proximity. Such a system incorporates an existing wireless communications network, such as a cellular network, satellite network, paging network, narrowband PCS, narrowband trunk radio, or other wireless communication network. Combinations of such networks and other embodiments may be substituted without departing from the present system.

Figure 18 shows one embodiment of a PDU 1820 which includes a communications module 18200, a control 18202, one or more detectors 18204, and power 18206. In one embodiment PDU 1820 is a self powered detector capable of communications with a PCP 1810 in one embodiment, a wireless communications network (not shown in Figure 18) in another embodiment, or both a PCP 1810 and a wireless communications network in yet another embodiment. Other embodiments and combinations are possible without departing from the present system.

In the PDU 1820 shown in Figure 18, there is a detector 18204 which detects events, including, but not limited to, motion detection, temperature detection, water detection, vibration detection, breakage detection, smoke detection, carbon monoxide detection, and proximity detection. Other detectors or combinations of detectors may be used without departing from the present system. In various embodiments, control 18202 coordinates communications between the communications module 18200 and the outside world (such as PCP 1810 or a wireless communication network, for example). Control 18202 may also process instructions received by communications module 18200 regarding arming the PDU 1820, disarming PDU 1820, and cancellation of alarms, to name a few operations. With control 18202, several operations may be performed using multiple detectors.

In one embodiment, the PDU 1820 includes an output module 18208 that provides control outputs to auxiliary devices and appliances 18210. The outputs may be used to actuate an audible or visual annunciator in the premise such as an alarm. In other applications the outputs may be connected to appliances to provide actuation or control. The outputs may be signaled by changes in voltages, impedance, current, magnetic field, electromagnetic energy such as radio frequency signals, infrared signals or optical signals, and audible or other forms of mechanical energy. The outputs may be direct changes of state, analog, or digital in form. Several embodiments are possible, and the examples given herein are not intended in a limiting or restrictive sense. The output module may be activated and controlled by the PCP 1810 or the control 18202, or by the actuation of the detector 18204 or a combination of these.

In one embodiment the PDU 1820 is self-powered. In one embodiment the PDU 1820 is powered using an auxiliary power supply. In one embodiment the PDU 1820 is charged using an auxiliary power supply. Figure 19A, Figure 19B and Figure 19C demonstrate a variety of short range and long range communications modules 18200 in various embodiment examples. For instance, in Figure 19A, the communication modules 18200 includes a short range module, such as a bidirectional short range communication system with a network module. The network module may be used either for long range communications over a wireless communications network or for short range communications where the network is also used. Such a system may include programmable or automatically selecting electronics to decide whether to conduct communications between the PDU 1820 and the outside world using the short range module or the network module. In one embodiment the system may employ different portions of the network to provide short range, intermediate range, or long range network connections, depending on the distance between the PDU and any receiving component of the system, such as PCP or central station. In one such embodiment, the network automatically adjusts for different required transmission distances.

In one embodiment, the network module is a cellular communications module. In one embodiment, the network module is a paging module, for example, a two-way paging module. In one embodiment the network module is a satellite module. In one embodiment the network module is a wideband or narrowband PCS module. In one embodiment the network module is a wideband or narrowband trunk radio module. Other modules are possible without departing from the present system. In one embodiment, the network module supports multiple network systems, such as a cellular module and a two-way paging module, for example. In such embodiments, the system may prefer one form of network communications over another and may switch depending on a variety of factors such as available service, signal strength, or types of communications being supported. For example, the cellular module may be used as a default and the paging module may take over once cellular service is either weak or otherwise unavailable. Other permutations are possible without departing from the present system.

Figure 19B shows an embodiment including a network module. The variations in embodiments of network modules and uses of each described above apply here as well.

Figure 19C shows an embodiment where a short-range communications module is used for conducting communications between the PDU 1820 and the outside world. Any conventional and non-conventional bi-directional short range communications may be employed for short range communications.

Figure 20 shows a block diagram of one embodiment of a PCP 2010 having communications module 20400, control 20402, I/O 20404 and power 20406. In one embodiment, the PCP 2010 has a counterpart communications module to PDU 1820 so that the communications are possible using the same communication means. For example, if PDU 1820 has a network module and a short range module, as shown in Figure 19A, then PCP 2010, in this embodiment, includes a network module and a short range module, capable of supporting bi-directional communications between PDU 1820, PCP 2010, and possibly a wireless communication network. In other embodiments, the PCP 2010 need not have counterpart communications modules20 400 to those in PDU 1820. Control 20402 of PCP 2010 is used to coordinate instructions entered on I/O 20404 for transmission to the PDU 1820 using communication module 20400. In one embodiment I/O 20404 is a keypad for entering instructions with a display for viewing status information. In one embodiment an audio indicator is used to signal a detected event. In one embodiment a visual indicator is used to signal a detected event. In one embodiment a vibration indicator is used to signal a detected event. In one embodiment separate indicators are provided for a plurality of detection functions.

In one embodiment, the power supply of PCP 20406 is used to power the device. In one embodiment, the PCP 2010 is powered using an auxiliary power supply. In one embodiment the PCP 2010 is charged using an auxiliary power supply.

Figure 21 is a diagram demonstrating different communication modes possible with the present system according to one embodiment. In this figure PDU 21501 at premises A may communicate over a wireless communication network 21530 to transceive signals relating to detected events with central station 21540 or PCP 21512. If PCP 21512 is in range for short range communications, then PCP 21512 may receive signals directly from a PDU, such as PDU 21502 shown at premises B in Figure 21.

PCP 21512 may also communicate with other PDUs and with other PCPs, such as PCP 21513. In figure 21 the communications between PCP 21512 and PCP 21513 are not shown over network 21530, however, such communications are possible in various embodiments of the present system. In like manner, PDUs may communicate with multiple PCPs, not all possessing identical communication modules. Inter-protocol and inter-network communication may be managed separately, for example, both paging and cellular networks and modules communicate with each other through an IP-based protocol, such as over the Internet. In one embodiment, PCP 21513 is programmable to assume the identity of another

PCP, such as PCP 21512. When PCP 21513 assumes the identity of PCP 21512, it acts as if it were PCP 21512 to the external world. One application where this is particularly useful is for when the native PCP becomes disabled or failed to operate. In this case, another PCP with the proper authorization and access code is used to perform any monitoring and/or control function. There are several methods of assuming identity: In one embodiment, PCP 21512 and PCP 21513 are part of a trusting domain of a network. In another embodiment, PCP 21512 and PCP 21513 are friends in the sense of object methodologies. In another embodiment, PCP 21513 assumes the identity of PCP 21512 by entering a certain security code, such as a password. In another embodiment, PCP 21513 includes an alias of PCP 21512, where aliases of PCP 21512 have the same security clearance of access as PCP

21512. In another embodiment, PCP 21513 is an alias of PCP 21512, where aliases of PCP 21512 have a predetermined level of security clearance of access of PCP 21512. These examples are no exclusive or exhaustive and other embodiments exist that do not depart from the present systems and methods. In one embodiment wireless communication network 21530 is a cellular telephone network. In another embodiment wireless communication network 21530 is a two-way paging network. In one embodiment wireless communication network 21530 is a satellite network. In one embodiment wireless communication network 21530 is a wideband or narrowband PCS network. In one embodiment wireless communication network 21530 is a wideband or narrowband trunk radio network. Other networks are possible without departing from the present system. In one embodiment, wireless communication network 21530 supports multiple network systems, such as cellular mode and a two-way paging network, for example. In such embodiments, the system may prefer one form of network communications to another and may switch depending on a variety of factors such as available service, signal strength, or types of communications being supported. For example, the cellular network may be used as the primary network and the paging network may take over once cellular service is either weak or otherwise unavailable. In another embodiment the transmission may originate in one type of network such as a paging network and terminate in another type of network such as a cellular network. The symbol for wireless communication network 21530 is not intended to be limited to literally a single communication tower and may include a plurality of such towers and associated wired telephone, ISDN, fiber optic, and other communications infrastructures in various combinations. Such systems may employ conventional or specialized protocols without departing from the present system. For example, MOTOROLA Coφoration has introduced two way paging protocols such as ReFLEX 25 and ReFLEX 50. Other protocols and wireless communication networks may be employed without departing from the present system.

Security: In the situation where alarms are provided for detected events, the central station 21540 may receive such alarms and process them for dispatch assistance 21550 from emergency personnel. In one embodiment, false alarms are identified and cancelled prior to transmission to the central station by an operator of a PCP, such as PCP 21512 or PCP

21513. Systems for alarm cancellation and monitoring are provided in this disclosure and in the patent applications incorporated by reference herein.

In embodiments for security detection, the security industry has developed numerous types of detection devices for monitoring many types of conditions. These detection devices feature an output that changes state upon detection of the event being monitored by the device.

One embodiment of the present system uses the output of such detection devices and connects them as an input signal for a two-way, long-range, wireless communicator such as one employing narrowband PCS (two-way paging), cell phone type transmitter, PCS, cellemetry, or other similar device. The detection devices include, but are not limited to, motion detectors, door switches, water sensors, smoke detectors, temperature sensors, or a loop(s) of detection devices to detect a condition or occurrence and provide an output. The outputs may be signaled by changes in voltages, impedance, current, magnetic field, electromagnetic energy such as radio frequency signals, infrared signals or optical signals, and audible or other forms of mechanical energy. The outputs may be direct changes of state, analog, or digital in form. Several embodiments are possible, and the examples given herein are not intended in a limiting or restrictive sense.

The present system, in several embodiments, provides the signals from the detection devices to the two-way, long-range, wireless communicator instead of connecting them to a security alarm control system.

In one embodiment, the detection system incorporates on-site, a long-range two-way wireless communication devices which are compatible for communications with a two-way wireless communication device that is carried by the system user. The system user then utilizes their communication device to control and receive messages from the detection system. In one embodiment, the on-site communication device may trigger local annunciators like horns or flashing lights or actuate other equipment such as heating lights or mechanical equipment.

Figure 22 shows one embodiment of the present design in a detection system wherein a motion detector located in a home is connected to a two-way communications device, such as one employing two-way paging communication capabilities. The motion detector provides a signal to the two-way pager when detecting motion. The two-way pager transmits a signal over the paging network to the owner anywhere in the paging network. In one embodiment, if the person carries a two-way pager, then the person may elect to perform a function in response to the detected event, for example to disarm the detector by providing the proper command to the motion detector over the two-way paging network. Other embodiments are possible without departing from the present system and a number of functions may be supported by various embodiments of the present detection system.

Figure 23 shows a block diagram of a detection system according to one embodiment of the present system. The block diagram shows the relationship between the communication module 23710 and the detector 23720 in PDU 23770. The two-way pager 23760 may serve as the PCP in this system. It can be used to monitor alarms, disarm the system and to cancel false alarms, among other things. The system provides for optional transmission to other destinations 23750, which may be accomplished over a wireless bi-directional communication network, among other things. Wireless Network: The wireless network employed may be any consumer or proprietary network designed to serve users in range of the detection system, including, but not limited to, a cellular network such as analog or digital cellular systems employing such protocols and designs as PCS, CDMA, TDMA; a paging network such as those employing FLEX™ or POCSAG™; other data networks such as RAMNET™ or Ardis™; proprietary special design networks such as Alarmnet™ or Procom™ ; or proprietary wireless networks. In one embodiment the detection system incorporates ReFLEX™ (a Motorola™ trademark) 25 or 50 narrow band PCS products and services (types of wireless technologies used for 2-way pagers). The advantage to this type of technology is that it requires low power consumption for devices, has inexpensive devices, and provides flexible 2-way communication. PDU Communications Module: In one embodiment, a pager-like device, such as a device employing pager or other 2-way long range wireless communication capabilities, is connected to one or more detection devices. The interface between these devices is designed to function with standard manufactured detection devices using for example, but not limited to, small control relays or voltage triggers, or a standard communication protocol like RS- 232, or built as a single integrated circuit with a detection device and thus requiring no external interface. The relay /voltage trigger embodiment provides a design that can be easily adapted to a wide array of existing detection devices or a circuit loop of devices. The integrated circuit embodiment provides a low net cost if the device is produced in large quantities.

In one embodiment the 2-way pager device located at the protected location is a CreataLink™ as manufactured by Motorola company. These are a series of intelligence enhanced 2-way narrowband PCS modems operating with ReFLEX 25 or ReFLEX 50 protocols. These products are being constantly upgraded and currently being manufactured as CreataLink2; soon to be manufactured as CreataLink2XLT. The CreataLink device is incorporated with other sensors and control circuitry as needed to provide one version of a PDU. The CreataLink devices may be modified and adapted for use with detectors and other bi-directional wireless network communication modules, as provided in herein.

PCP: In one embodiment, the users are in two-way communication with their detection system via a wireless means in order to provide the highest assurance of contact wherever the user may be. This allows the user to be informed of detected events and to control the detection system from in, nearby, or distant from the location of the premises. The PCP may be of several different designs. For example, in one embodiment it may be a standard pager or other one-way wireless device. This would function satisfactorily for a user needing only annunciation of a detected condition and requiring no interactive capability with the detecting portion of the system.

In another embodiment, the PCP may be a "response messaging" capable two way pager. This is service where a two way pager receives a message and optional multiple- choice responses. The user can select the appropriate responses. Such a design may be adapted to provide basic control options related to the detection system and any central station monitoring.

In another embodiment, the PCP may be a programmable two-way paging device such as the Motorola Page Writer™ 2000 (literature is attached). This is a class of device that acts as both a two-way pager and a handheld computer also known as a PDA (Personal Digital Assistant).

In another embodiment, the PCP may be a cellular telephone. The PCP and the protected location device may communicate of compatible design may communicate with each other through the use of touch tones, digital information, voice messaging, or cellemetry technologies. The cell phone may be analog or digital in any of the various technologies employed by the cell phone industry such as PCS, or CDMA, or TDM A, or others. The cell phone may have programmable capability such as is found in a Nokia™ 9000 series of devices.

In embodiments where the user employs standard or adapted paging or cell phones as their PCP, security passwords are entered by using numeric or other keys on a phone. In the embodiment of a pager, a distinct order of pressing certain keys could provide the equivalent of a security code. For example, 3 short and 1 long on a certain key; or once on key 'a', once on key 'b', and once more on key 'a'.

In another embodiment, the PCP is a handheld computer. Many PDAs offer programmable capability and connectivity to various types of long-range wireless networks. Another example of this type of device is the PalmPilot™ or Palm series of devices manufactured by 3 -COM™ . In these embodiments where a programmable PCP is used such as a PalmPilot, Page Writer or programmable cell phone, the programmable nature of the devices facilitates the implementation of industry-standard designs and would allow for the development of a program written for the devices. In another embodiment, a special manufactured device may be manufactured to serve the needs of the system user.

Network Modifications for a PCP with both Long-Range Wireless Capability and Adapted Short-Range Wireless Capability

In one embodiment the PCP employs an adaptation of the long-range capability of such devices to create a short-range wireless communication without full network intervention. Because much of the communication between the PCP and the PDU is in relatively close proximity, the wireless devices and/ or the network may be adapted to communicate more directly instead of through the entire network. More direct communication speeds up the connection and reduces the burden of traffic in the network. Such an implementation would have applications beyond the use as described for the detection system herein. It may be used for connecting between nearby users of pagers at the mall, parents to children in the neighborhood and between workers in a workplace.

In one embodiment narrowband PCS is used in two-way paging networks. For example using ReFLEX 25 or 50 protocols or similar services, nearby pager devices may communicate more directly between devices, rather than having to pass a message through the entire network. There are several alternative embodiments of this as detailed below.

In one embodiment, paging devices are modified to communicate directly with each other. Since ReFLEX protocols normally use different frequencies for transmission and reception to and from the network, the devices may not be used without some modification. For example, the transmission on frequency "a" by one paging device would not be received by another paging device expecting to receive on frequency "b" . Therefore, in one embodiment the transmitting paging device may change its frequency before sending direct to another device. This is accomplished automatically or as a manual switch, either in software or otherwise. In another embodiment, the transmission is routed to the first tower or just into the local network. Most paging carriers use satellites for transmission to and from localized areas. In this embodiment, traffic may avoid the satellite portion of the route and save traffic burden there.

In any of the previous embodiments of this section, the network is able to supervise traffic for billing and other purposes. In addition, in these embodiments, messages may be tagged as "direct connect" for routing purposes. See the information on messaging described herein.

In another embodiment, a separate short range wireless system is incorporated into a unified device employing both a short range wireless system and a long range wireless system. In this embodiment, a key fob type of device such as though currently used for unlocking automobiles and disarming detection systems is combined with a long range wireless device such as those described herein. This embodiment affords the advantage of a no-service-fee wireless connection for nearby use and a service-fee wireless network for long- range use. PCP with other Manufactured Systems: The various PCP design embodiments described herein may benefit the system described herein and also many other security, alarm, detection and control systems manufactured presently and in the past, rather than the PDU described herein. For example, in an embodiment using a two-way paging network, a Motorola PageWriter™ 2000 with an alarm program, may function as the user interface, while a CreataLink™ 2XT may provide the connection to the security, alarm, detection or control system as manufactured currently. In one embodiment, the CreataLink™ may be connected directly to a manufacturer's system's control panel using the I/O signals, the RS232 or TTL serial interface, or it may be connected using these ports through a separate interface board. For example, in the security alarm industry, some alarm panels support control functions with simple I/O signals, some support RS232 or other serial interfaces, and many have a proprietary serial connection available for remote keypad control. In another embodiment with a custom interface board or with adapted programming in the alarm panel a device such as the CreataLink™ is connected to the alarm control panel. These teachings are applicable to all of the major security industry manufacturers of alarm control equipment, such as Ademco™, ITI ™, DSC™, Napco™, Radionics™, DMP™, and many others.

Because of the tremendous variability of manufactured security, alarm, detection and control systems, and the range of PCPs, as described herein, available to control these systems, the details of each and every specific design would be virtually endless. Hence, the embodiments provided herein are not intended in an exclusive or limited sense, and variations may exist in organization, dimension, hardware, software, mechanical design and configuration without departing from the claimed invention, the scope of which is provided by the attached claims and equivalents thereof.

Position Transmitted with Detected Condition: The design of the detection and control system with its low power requirements and bi-directional wireless communication capabilities makes it suited to mobile applications as well as the fixed applications previously discussed. However, the response required for a mobile application often requires knowledge of where the premises have moved. For example, in protecting vehicles such as automobiles, trucks, and boats, the protected item may have moved. In one embodiment of the detection system, a GPS receiver is incorporated and the system transmits GPS coordinates along with the detection signals. In another embodiment of the detection system, other types of coordinates are transmitted such as with LORAN.

In one embodiment the user device may incorporate mapping capabilities for locating the mobile unit. In one embodiment the mapping capabilities may be resident in the user device or in another embodiment the maps may be downloaded from a central storage facility. In another embodiment a directional message could be displayed showing which direction and/or distance the detection signal emanated from. Such a coordinate may be updated from time to time.

Security Detection System Features: In one embodiment, the software in the PDU, the PCP, and the network is adapted to deliver the standard features of a typical detection, alarm, security, or detection system. These features are currently common to most manufacturers today, including ITI, Ademco, Napco, and others. Examples of these features include but are not limited to: system on/off (home-away-off, arm-disarm), delay zones, bypass/force arm, restore, opening and closing by user, prevention of multiple alarm transmissions in a specified period, user control of system related functions,

Thus, such embodiments provide features standard to a security alarm system without requiring a separate control panel to provide them. In addition, some of the embodiments provide enhancements to the standard features. One reason for the improvements is that a system user can provide interactive management functions of their system from the PCP regardless of where they are located. No longer do they need to be at the protected location. Some of the functions are discussed below, however, others exist and the following is not intended to be a limiting of exhaustive discussion of functions.

Zone Bypass. This feature allows a user to turn off the transmission of signals for a particular detector or group of detectors. This is done for the following common reasons: When the user is on site and wants to retain some protection, for example intrusion detection, but wants to turn off some interior motion detectors.

When the person is prone to accidentally trigger a detector. For example, as listed in item 1, perhaps there is an interior motion detector downstairs, but they sleep upstairs; they would prefer to have the motion detector on while sleeping, but often forget and trip the detector when they come down in the morning.

When a person is first learning to use their system, sometimes the entire system is bypassed so emergency agencies are not dispatched. When a zone seems to be prone to false-alarms and the source of the signals is not determined or repaired. The zone may send a real or a false alarm.

One problem with zone bypass is that it is an all-or-nothing design. The zone(s) or detector(s) is either transmitting signals or not. In one embodiment of the present system, a new type of condition, which we herein label "zone confirmation" is supported by the system. Conditions 2,3,4 above would be better served in many cases if the user was notified of an detected event and may then optionally "confirm" the condition before it was transmitted to the central station. This confirmation may be required, or it may have a built in delay period where an opportunity to cancel would be given before the alarm was transmitted. The user's confirmation or lack thereof may be transmitted to the central station and add valuable information to the response effort.

Arm/Disarm Confirmation. When a user armed or disarmed their system (turned their system on or off), confirmation of the on or off is sent back to the PCP that they are carrying and doing the activation from. This is currently not possible even with the short-range wireless devices used in the industry currently. Delay Zones. Delay zones are built into detection control panels to provide time for a user to enter their code into a keypad or other device and then enter or exit the premise before the protection is activated. Because upon entry, this delay is activated, there is a desire to make the delay short. Otherwise an intruder might have time to tamper with or destroy the system before it transmits a signal. However, delay zones may be built into the PCP instead. This would allow a user to optionally cancel or confirm an event condition before the network transmitted it forward to a central station or other site. As a result, the system would be effectively instantaneous, that is - continuously armed without delay zones, allowing an intruder no delay time to defeat a system, but allowing a user an opportunity to disarm the system. Alarm Verification/Cancellation. Due to the large number of false alarms associated with security systems, it is ordinary for central monitoring centers to verify alarms with users before dispatching agencies. Since this detection system uses a method whereby the user can be in contact with the central monitoring station anywhere they are located, the verification could occur via the user's interface. Hence, an embodiment of the present system may incorporate special alarm verification/cancellation technology as described in U.S. provisional 60/098,270, filed Aug. 28, 1998 and U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 09/219,737, filed Dec. 22, 1998, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.

Other embodiments are possible and the examples provided herein are intended to be demonstrative and not exclusive or exhaustive of the present invention, which is determined by the scope of the appended claims and the full range of equivalents to which they are entitled.

System Messaging: Capcodes: In one embodiment using NPCS (Narrowband PCS) as the wireless transmission method, pager capcodes are used for addressing. Capcodes are the addresses used to identify individual addresses and there is a unique capcode for each pager or common pager address. In common addressing - pagers can hold more than one capcode for broadcast messaging - a common capcode identifies a group of users. For example, capcode 978654903 may uniquely indicate Joe Smith's pager while another capcode may also reside on Joe Smith's pager for broadcast receipt of the news or weather that is received simultaneously by multiple users with the same broadcast capcode. Therefore, capcodes are used to identify an individual user or group of users and likewise identify the detection system that is associated with the users.

Rapid Data Transmission: It is important that the data is received rapidly both to enhance protection and to help to provide rapid verification in order to cancel alarms. The transmission of data in this embodiment is done in a rapid burst method. The reason for this is as follows: As available in NPCS transmissions, for example with FLEX 25 and 50 - two of the protocols currently available for NPCS services - there is a short message availability (11 bit) that allows for very rapid transmission. In cellular there is a technology called Cellemetry or Microburst that accomplishes a similar function. This short and rapid messaging is a feature of many large scale wireless networks. The short message is typically available to be sent immediately and rapidly and often at a lower cost. For example, in FLEX 25, longer messages require time to set up transmission frames. By using a short burst transmission, as much as 20 seconds or more may be saved in the transmission time requirement. This delay is of serious consequence because in the security industry, life and property may be in peril. In addition, delays make it difficult to coordinate the rapidly proceeding dispatch between the central station and the users. However, the short message has constraints of its own: it is a short message. Therefore, the message must be encoded. A solution for encoding in FLEX related services is presented later.

Hence, in one embodiment a short predetermined digitally encoded message is transmitted from the detection system to the PCP carried by remote users and/or to the central station.

At the central station a look up table is employed to decode the message. In a similar fashion, a look up table may be employed by the PCP to decode the message. Figure 8 shows one such example of a look up table. Message Decoding in the Network: Usually transmission networks are designed to simply receive a message and transport it to a destination. The network doesn't "read" the message or "act" on it except to read an address and send it to the destination. However, as networks become imbued with enhanced computing capability, they can read more of the message and process messaging far beyond mere transport. Therefore, as an alternative embodiment, the look up table may reside in the network and the message may be decoded by the network before it is delivered to any destination.

This is a good way for delivering a message to the PCPs unable to decode messages such as limited capability pagers or cell phones. The encoded burst message would then be decoded in the network and a user would be delivered an English or other language message according to the interpretation or look up table.

The effect is that an encoded burst message that looks like "00101000111" may be decoded in the network and read out "Burglary Area 4" on a pager. The same numeric message may be decoded after receipt in a more sophisticated user device or after receipt at the central station. Alternative Message Paths: One embodiment of this design uses a single two way wireless device carried by the users instead of one device to receive the message and another to transmit the verification information to the central station. This saves cost and simplifies design. However, two separate devices may be used.

In other embodiments, the notification of the remote users may be accomplished simultaneously with the central station or instantly relayed by the central station or any other relay point.

Again, in one embodiment, the transmission of data may be done in a rapid burst method. In this process, a short predetermined digitally encoded message is transmitted to the central station from the user device. Alternatively, longer messages can be employed, but they may take longer to be received.

In the event that NPCS is the selected wireless transmission method, a standard two way pager using response paging is used as the response device carried by the user to communication/control with the detection system and to the central station. In this design option a response message can either be presaved on the two way pager or can be transmitted to the pager. Since time is important, a presaved response message is the best solution since it does not require any additional transmission time.

Other custom designed devices and devices using other wireless technologies can also be used to accomplish the same effect. Encoding: Encoding is a straightforward process. The following encoding example is offered for the use of NPCS FLEX 25 two way pager wireless services. In FLEX 25 an 11 bit message (an 11 bit message is eleven zeros or ones) is available for a burst transmission. This message is then split or parsed into registry sections for the purpose of sending a message. The table (Figure 9) describes sample registers and their potential purpose. As a result a message like "001/0111/0101" (slashes indicate breaks in the register of the look up table and are not transmitted) can be interpreted to mean: send a message to Joe Smith's pager capcode 957843756 reading "Fire area 5" and send a message "001/0111/0101" to Central Station A and send "001/0111/0101" Central Station B if Central Station A is not receiving. The above register size, order, and meaning can be changed to meet the needs of individual network designs. However, the purpose and use remains unchanged. Similar encoding registers can be used in any wireless transmission short bursting format.

Conclusion Although the specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that any arrangement which is calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiment shown. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the present invention. It is to be understood that the above description is intended to be illustrative and not restrictive. Combinations of the above embodiments and other embodiments will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the above description. The scope of the invention includes any other applications in which the above structures and fabrication methods are used. Accordingly, the scope of the invention should only be determined with reference to the appended claims, along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled.

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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *See also references of EP1149368A2
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US778327815 Mar 200624 Aug 2010Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Installation of a personal emergency response system
US963532317 Aug 201625 Apr 2017Eyetalk365, LlcCommunication and monitoring system
US964829017 Aug 20169 May 2017Eyetalk365, LlcCommunication and monitoring system
US970617817 Aug 201611 Jul 2017Eyetalk365, LlcCommunication and monitoring system
Classifications
International ClassificationG08B25/10, G08B13/22
Cooperative ClassificationG08B25/008, G08B25/10, G08B25/001, G08B25/007
European ClassificationG08B25/00P, G08B25/10
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