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Publication numberWO1997019001 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberPCT/NO1996/000277
Publication date29 May 1997
Filing date22 Nov 1996
Priority date24 Nov 1995
Also published asCA2238078A1, CA2238078C, CN1088031C, CN1207713A, DE69619135D1, EP0869907A1, EP0869907B1
Publication numberPCT/1996/277, PCT/NO/1996/000277, PCT/NO/1996/00277, PCT/NO/96/000277, PCT/NO/96/00277, PCT/NO1996/000277, PCT/NO1996/00277, PCT/NO1996000277, PCT/NO199600277, PCT/NO96/000277, PCT/NO96/00277, PCT/NO96000277, PCT/NO9600277, WO 1997/019001 A1, WO 1997019001 A1, WO 1997019001A1, WO 9719001 A1, WO 9719001A1, WO-A1-1997019001, WO-A1-9719001, WO1997/019001A1, WO1997019001 A1, WO1997019001A1, WO9719001 A1, WO9719001A1
InventorsPetter Konrad BJØRNSEN
ApplicantBjoernsen Petter Konrad
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: Patentscope, Espacenet
Beverage can device
WO 1997019001 A1
Abstract
A device for a beverage can, wherein the top (1') of the container (1) has a depressed portion (6), and wherein the top surface (3') of the can has a detachable section (4) connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means (3). The depressed portion interacts with a cover (2; 13; 13'; 20), optionally designed to have or to form a cavity. Said cavity is capable of accommodating an article or a foodstuff. The cover, optionally its effected cavity, may in addition be provided with legible information, e.g., an advertisement.
Claims  (OCR text may contain errors)
P a t e n t c l a i m s
1. A device for a beverage can, preferably of a stackable type, wherein the bottom and/or top ofthe can (1) has a depressed portion, wherein the top of the can has a detachable section (4) connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means (3), where in the depressed portion there is provided a cover (2) which is designed as a cavity, or which on its back has a recess, and where the wall ofthe depressed portion surrounds and substantially bears against the periphery ofthe cover over at least a part of its axial extent, characterised in that the cover (2) on the back thereof is provided with two diagonally arranged, backwardly inclined, opposing fixing flaps (8, 9) and designed, when the cover (2) is pressed down towards the top ofthe can (3') thereby bending the fixing flaps in the direction ofthe front of the cover, to come into engagement between the top surface ofthe can and said pull means (3).
2.
A device for a beverage can, preferably of a stackable type, wherein the bottom and/or top ofthe can (1) has a depressed portion, and wherein the can top has a detachable section (4) connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means (3), characterised by a cover (13; 13'; 20) having an upper and a lower portion which essentially correspond to the top portion and the bottom portion ofthe beverage can (1), and designed to cover the depressed portion ofthe can bottom or top, and where the cover has an axial extent (L2) which is substantially smaller than the axial extent (Ll) of the beverage can.
3.
A device for a beverage can, preferably of a stackable type, wherein the top ofthe can has a depressed portion (26) with a further recessed rim (27) along the inner wall (28) of the depressed portion, and also a detachable section (29) connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means (30), wherein in the depressed portion there is provided a cover (24) which is designed to have a cavity (24') or on its back has a recess, and where the wall (28) ofthe depressed portion surrounds and substantially bears against the periphery ofthe cover over at least a part of its axial extent, characterised in that the cover (24) along its upper outer rim has a sealing lip (31) intended for contact with said inner wall (28)^ and along its lower outer rim has a bead (32) designed to fit into said recessed rim (27), a vacuum being produced between the back of the cover and the top surface of the can, by arranging the cover (24) in the depressed portion (26) of the can.
4.
A device as disclosed in claim 3, characterised in that the bead (32) is made of a material which, when the cover is pressed down into the depressed portion (26) and vacuum is actuated simultaneously, is caused to expand laterally into the recessed rim (27).
5.
A device as disclosed in claim 3 or claim 4, characterised in that in the recessed rim (27) there is provided an adhesive (34) for adhesion to the bead (32) ofthe cover (24).
6.
A device as disclosed in claims 2, 3 or 4, characterised in that the cover (13; 13') has a tear-off portion (4').
7.
A device as disclosed in claim 2, characterised in that the cover (13; 13'; 20) is secured to the can (1 ) with the aid of an adhesive or wrapping material.
8.
A device as disclosed in claim 2, 6 or 7, characterised in that the axial extent (L2) ofthe cover (13; 13'; 20) is 20-50% ofthe axial extent (Ll) of the beverage can.
9. A device as disclosed in one or more of claims 2, 6-8, characterised in that the cover (13; 13'; 20) is adapted to contain a foodstuff or stimulant in liquid or solid form.
10.
A device as disclosed in one or more or claims 2 to 9, characterised in that the cover (13; 13'; 20) is adapted to contain an article.
1 1.
A device as disclosed in one or more of claims 2, 6, 7 or 8, characterised in that the cover (13) is arranged to cover the depressed portion of the can (1), and that the assembly of the can (1) and the cover is surrounded wholly or partly by an upwardly open container (35).
12.
A device as disclosed in claim 1 1 , characterised in that about the upper portion (35') of the container (35) there is provided a detachable sealing means (36),, e.g., a band of heat shrinkable material, a sealing sleeve or sealing tape, which is in sealing contact with a peripheral portion (1 ") of said assembly, e.g., a portion of the can (1) or a portion ofthe cover (13).
13.
A device as disclosed in claim 11 or 12, characterised in that the container (35) is made in the form of a drinking glass.
14.
A can of a stackable type, wherein the bottom and or top ofthe container has a depressed portion and is provided uppermost and lowermost with an inwardly curved end portion to enable the container to be stacked with a can located above and/or below, made having a substantially similar bottom and top portion, and where the top surface of the can has a detachable portion (4') connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means (3), characterised in that the can (13, 13') has an axial extent which is substantially smaller than the axial extent of a known beverage can (1) per se, preferably 20-50% of the axial extent ofthe beverage can (1), and that it serves as a detachable cover for the top or bottom of such a known beverage can (1) per se.
15.
A can as disclosed in claim 14, characterised in that it contains a foodstuff or stimulant in liquid or solid form, or an article.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

BEVERAGE CAN DEVI CE

The present invention relates to a device for a beverage can as disclosed in the preamble of the attached patents claims 1, 2 and 3. Furthermore, the invention relates to a can of a stackable type as disclosed in claim 14.

The point of departure for the present invention is to provide in connection with beverage cans a best possible covering ofthe top and/or bottom ofthe can, so that there is no likelihood of primarily the top part ofthe can becoming contaminated with dirt, dust or the like around the pouring aperture ofthe can, whilst ensuring that the can is capable of being stacked, and also that use ofthe external bottom area ofthe can is possible.

US Patent 4,927,048 relates to a beverage can having a sanitary cover which is designed to rest over the top portion ofthe can and the fold around the folded edge between the cylindrical part ofthe can and its top. The sanitary cover must in its orientation be in alignment with the position ofthe pouring aperture of the can, so that when the cover is torn off, the pouring aperture and the aperture generating pull means are exposed. In an automation process this will require relatively expensive equipment in order to ensure that the mutual orientation is made possible, whilst the folding operation will cause a reduction in the production rate.

From US Patent 5,131,554 it is known to provide a beverage can with a dust cover which is riveted to the pull means which is to be used to tear open the pouring aperture. The cover is thus designed to lie completely flush with the top ofthe can and requires a can type which is not conventionally used.

US Patent 5,273,176 relates to a solution where a cover capable of being pivoted upwards can be provided over the top ofthe can, and where the edges of the cover extend beyond the periphery ofthe can top. The cover has a through-going hole for a straw and is designed to be positioned such that relative to the pouring aperture of the can, said hole in the cover corresponds to the pouring aperture when this has been opened. The object of the taught solution is also to be able to close the cover after drinking from the can with the aid of the straw. A disadvantage of this known solution is that the stackability of the cans is affected, whilst arrangement in connection with, e.g., a six-pack, is rendered virtually impossible owing to the reduced attachment flange on the can.

US Patent 5,139,163 relates to a solution reminiscent of that taught in US Patent 5,273,176. In this known solution, clustering, e.g., a six-pack, is rendered completely impossible owing to the fact that the cover rests on the outside of the can top and the top flange ofthe can is no longer accessible. The cover is provided with a tear-off means to make the pouring aperture ofthe can and its pull means accessible. Just as in the other known solutions, a proportional, mutual orientation between the positioned cover and the pouring aperture ofthe can is required if the user is to enjoy the benefits the cover is intended to give. However, a solution of this kind is difficult to combine with an automated process.

US Patent 4,708,257 describes a beverage can with a seal which is adhered or shrunk onto the top ofthe can to prevent the top ofthe can from being contaminated. The seal may consist of a circular, thin film or foil which curls up where it is torn open from one side.

US Patent 4,651 ,890 makes known a solution wherein on the underside of the can there is provided a tear-open pouch containing a moist wipe means for cleaning the top of he beverage can prior to drinking directly from the can.

US Patent 1 ,879,517 relates to a can, jar or the like, where the top or bottom ofthe can is provided with a further lid or cover in addition to the real lid and cover, and where this additional lid or cover may contain an article of some kind.

US Patent 3,638,787 relates to a special package for packing several cans together in addition to a fragile unit of some kind which is not a part ofthe actual cans, but is hidden by the packaging. This solution is particularly well suited in connection with packing fragile articles which cannot be packed mechanically.

US Patent 3.1 12,824 relates to a can or bottle wherein the top of the can or bottle is provided with a cover which may contain an article of some kind.

US Patent 4.917,258 relates to a lid which can be snapped on to a beverage can. US Patent 2,804,201 relates to a solution whereby a lid can be placed on the top of a can which incoφorates a can opener key, and where the lid when turned can be brought into engagement with the handle of the can opener key.

US Patent 2,120,403 relates to a solution where some form of advertising matter may be provided on the actual can opener key which is secured in a conventional manner to the top of the can, whereupon the top ofthe can may be covered with a lid. This lid is shown having various types of design where it is possible to allow the space between the lid and the cavity ofthe can to contain an article of some kind.

European Patent Publication 404 734 shows a further illustration of the state ofthe art, where the edge of a beverage can may be provided with a snap-on drinking lip so that the person drinking from the can does not come into direct contact with the metal of the beverage can, whilst the device also enables a certain covering of the exposed aperture leading into the cavity ofthe can, which may be practical if there is a desire to temporarily close the can.

An object ofthe present invention is to provide a solution in connection with a beverage can, whereby the cover which is to be arranged on the top surface ofthe can is capable of being attached in a simple manner.

The characterising features ofthe aforementioned devices and the can of a stackable type are set forth in the claims below.

However, an object ofthe present invention is to provide solutions where a covering of the pouring aperture of the can may be combined with other advantages, whilst at the same time other possibilities have been discovered with the present invention for the use of surfaces on a beverage can of this kind.

The invention will now be described in more detail with reference to the attached drawings.

Figs. 1 to 5 illustrate a first embodiment of the device according to the invention.

Figs. 6 and 7 illustrate a second embodiment of the device according to the invention, with different types of joints between the cover and the beverage can. Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate a third embodiment ofthe device according to the invention. with different types of joints between the cover and the beverage can.

Figs. 10. 1 1, 12 and 13 show alternative methods of securing cans in clusters for the embodiment according to Fig. 8.

Figs. 14 and 15 show a third embodiment of the device according to the invention and represent a modification ofthe solution in Figs. 9 and 13.

Figs. 16 to 18 illustrate a fourth embodiment of the device according to the invention.

Figs. 19 to 21 show a fifth embodiment of the device according to the invention.

In Fig. 1 it is shown how a beverage can 1 may be provided with a cover 2. The can 1 has a pull means 3 which actuates a weakening 4 in the top ofthe can in order to generate a pouring aperture.

The cover 2 may, e.g., be dome-shaped, as indicated in Fig. 5. The cover 2 may be provided with print 5, e.g. a printed advertisement, indicated as a mere example in the form of the letters ABC. However, it will be understood that any form of print is possible. Alternatively the print could be in the form of impressions in the material of the cover, e.g., produced during the forming process ofthe cover. The cover could be wholly or partly transparent, but it is also conceivable that cover is opaque in that a coating is applied, e.g., in the form of a protecting lacquer. Furthermore, it is also possible to allow the cover 2 to be light-reflecting perhaps in order to draw better attention to the message provided on the cover. As can be seen from Fig. 1 , the cover 2 is designed to fit into the depressed portion of the container top, so that the wall 6 ofthe depressed portion substantially bears against the periphery of the cover, as can better be understood with reference to Fig. 5.

The cover 2 will effectively protect the pouring aperture of the can from dust and contaminants before the can is emptied.

The attachment system ofthe cover which is shown in Figs. 1 to 5 is particularly useful for those cases- where the cover is only to be provided with print, e.g., a printed advertisement or is made having print in the form of impressions in the material of the cover. In this case the cover is preferably opaque. As can be seen from Fig. 4 the cover is made in this case of a sheet part 7 which has two diagonally arranged, backwardly slanting, opposing fixing flaps 8 and 9.. These fixing flaps are designed such that when the cover 2 is pressed down towards the can top 3', the flaps 8 and 9 are bent in the direction ofthe front face ofthe cover 2 or the sheet part 7 as indicated by means ofthe arrows 10, whereby the fixing flaps come into engagement between the top surface 3' of the can and the said pull means 3 in connection with the pouring aperture 4. The flaps preferably have an angle of departure in the range of 40-50°, although this range must not be seen to be limiting for the present invention. As shown in Fig. 5, when the cover 2 is in place, the top part 7 thereof be will slightly curved forwards or upwards, whilst the flaps 8 and 9 remain substantially parallel to the surface 3' ofthe can top. In this way an effective attachment method ofthe cover on to the top of a beverage can is obtained. An advantage ofthe solution shown in Figs. 1 to 5 is that engagement will take place with the pull means 3 irrespective ofthe mutual orientation of the fixing flaps 21 and 22 relative to the orientation ofthe pull means 3. This attachment method which can thus be seen from Figs. 1 to 5 is particularly suitable for automated application of the cover 2. The cover 2 will effectively be under tension when it is arranged in the position shown in Fig. 5.

A further development ofthe invention is also shown in Figs 6 to 9 where the cover is designed as a cavity, the cover in reality being made having an upper portion 1 1 and a lower portion 12 which in essence correspond to the design of the upper portion 1 ' and the lower portion 1 " ofthe beverage can 1. However, it can readily be envisaged that the depressed portions in the upper 1 1 and lower 12 portions of the cover respectively may be of a depth that is less than that of the depressed portions in the upper 1 ' and lower 1 " portions ofthe can. The cover in the present case is indicated by means of the reference numeral 13. The cover has a tear-off portion 4'. The cover, which in terms of appearance resembles a beverage can, has however substantially smaller axial extent L2 than the axial extent Ll ofthe beverage can. As a, for the invention non-limiting, example, the cover 13 may have an axial length which is equal to about 20 to 50% of the axial extent ofthe beverage can 1. The cover 13 in the form of a mini-can may be secured to the beverage can, e.g., by adhesion, as shown in Figs. 6 and 8. In the embodiment in Fig. 6, this takes place in that the lower, bevelled portion 12 of the cover 13 is provided with an adhesive, whilst in the embodiment in Fig. 8 the lower bevelled portion 14 on the beverage can is provided with an adhesive. In the embodiments according to Figs. 7 and 9, the cover part 13 is attached to the beverage can by means of tape or shrink wrap plastics 16. As can be seen in Fig. 10, an assembled unit consisting of a can 1 and a bottom cover 13 could form a part of a multi-pack, e.g., a six-pack. The six assembled can units consisting of three cans 1 and three bottom covers 13 are retained in a known way per se by a plastic film 15 known per se that is provided with holes and where the edges of the holes form secure engagement with the lower edge of the folded flange ofthe can.

In Fig. 1 1 an alternative packing form is shown, e.g., of four units 1 , 13, wherein a packing plastic film 17 extends around the top of the uppermost unit and around the bottom of the lowermost unit. The plastic film may optionally be of a type such that it has a carrying handle 18. It would optionally be expedient to connect the respective parts 1 and 13 in each unit with an adhesive to facilitate the packing. However, this is not a definite condition for the understanding and performance of the present invention.

In Fig. 12 it is shown that the container 13 may instead form a top cover 13' for the can 1. In this case it would be expedient to join the cover 13' and the can 1 with an adhesive, optionally to pack the units together in the same way as shown in connection with Fig. 1 1. In case the cover 13' is designed to be identical to the cover or mini-can 13 which is shown in connection with Figs. 6 to 9, and where the mini-can 13' is adhered to the beverage can 1 , a six-pack, for example, may be held together by means of a supporting plastic film 19 in a manner corresponding to that shown and described in connection with Fig. 10. However, it will be understood that other packing methods will be conceivable within the scope of the invention.

In this connection reference can also be made to Fig. 13 where three units which each consist of a can 1 and a cover 13 are arranged in a column, and where the joining takes place with the aid of tape or shrink wrap plastic 16 in the transition portions between the units.

As an example of the content in a cover or mini-can 13 or 13', mention can be made of articles in solid or liquid form, including typical taste samples such as introductory samples of new products, peanuts, chocolate and other foodstuffs or stimulants. It will immediately be appreciated that the covers represented by the mini-cans 13 and 13' will be capable of having print applied, e.g., a printed advertisement both around the periphery and on the top and bottom surfaces.

In Fig. 14 a solution is shown with a cover 20 which has a recess 21 which is adapted to the external periphery or bevelled portion 14 of the can 1 , and on its other side has an axially projecting integrated body 22 with a periphery adapted to the inner wall 6 in the depressed portion on an adjacent beverage can 1. However, it is worth noting that the cover 20 has a cross-section D2 which is no greater than the cross-section Dl ofthe beverage can. The cover 20 in the illustrated embodiment is intended to constitute a supporting mat for the can, e.g., made of a cork material or other material which does not scratch the underlying surface on which the beverage can 1 is to be placed.

Between the depressed portion 21 and the recess in the bottom of the can there may be placed an article, e.g., selected from a group consisting of lapel badges, mini-art, mini- CDs, lottery tickets, printed matter, mini-toys, souvenirs, bonus coupons, samples, serviettes, wipes, taste samples, advertisements, change. The use ofthe said space or cavity for change may be particularly relevant in connection with the sale of beverage cans or bottles in vending machines.

As an alternative to cork material, the cover 20 may be made of, for example, a soft plastic material or another material which under normal conditions does not cause scratching. Optionally, the cover 20 may conceivably be made of a wood fibre material.

To be able to sell the solution shown in Fig. 14 in an expedient manner, tape or shrink plastic 23 could conceivably be used to attach the cover 20 to the beverage can 1. However, this does not rule out the use of dots of adhesive between the can 1 and the cover 20. The sales unit as shown in Fig. 15 consists of a total of three can/cover units 1 , 20. The transitions between these units are made with the aid of tape or shrink wrap plastics. Alternatively, the connection can be made as shown and explained in connection with Fig. 1 1.

Although the said covers are preferably made ofthe same material as the beverage can, e.g., aluminium, this does not, of course, prevent other materials from being chosen for use in the covers. Possible alternative materials may conceivable be rigid or soft thermoplastics, or wood fibre materials, materials containing corn starch or other starch products, and optionally appropriate shrink wrap plastic materials. However, it should be noted that the choice of material for the covers should in no way be seen as limiting for the idea and scope ofthe invention.

Although in connection with the said covers, no consideration has been given to a direct covering ofthe top and outer edge of the can, there is of course nothing to prevent the top portion from being provided with a protecting film, e.g., of aluminium or plastic. However, when the can assembly is supplied in the form illustrated, e.g. in Figs. 13 and 15 and with the modifications thereof that are obvious to the skilled person, it will immediately be appreciated that a hygienic protection ofthe drinking edge of the beverage can could also be provided in part by those tape or shrink wrap plastic materials which are arranged around the transitions between the can/cover unit and an adjacent unit of this kind. The carrying piece which is located on the top of such a unit could easily be made so as to provide a sufficient covering ofthe top edge of the upper can 1. In the solution shown in Fig. 11, it will be ensured that the drinking edge is kept clean by using shrink plastic between the can 1 and the cover 13' for each unit thereof. If the mini-can 13' in addition has an upper portion which is equipped with a folded flange, it is possible to move the connecting film up to this portion of the can 13'.

In the embodiment according to Figs. 16 to 18. the cover 24 is intended for a beverage can 25, preferably of the stackable type, wherein the top of the can has a depressed portion 26 with a further recessed rim along the inner wall 28 of the depressed portion. As previously described, the can is in a known way designed to have a detachable section connected to a pouring aperture generating pull means 30.

The cover is designed to fit into the depressed portion 26 and has a cavity 24' or a recess in its back. The wall 28 ofthe depressed portion surrounds and substantially bears against the periphery of the cover over at least a part of its axial extent.

This alternative solution is characterised in that the cover 24 along upper outer rim thereof has a sealing lip 31 designed to bear against said inner wall 28 and along its lower outer rim has a bead 32 designed to fit into said recessed rim 27. When the cover 24 is pressed down into the depressed portion 26 ofthe can and the rim 27, in the same operation there is also produced a vacuum between the back of the cover 24 and the top surface 26' ofthe can through vacuum actuation during the pressing action. The bead 32 is to advantage made of a material which, when the cover 24 is pressed down into the depressed portion 26 and vacuum is actuated simultaneously, is subjected to a lateral expansion into the recessed rim 27, thereby obtaining improved adhesion and sealing, so that said vacuum between the cover 24 and the depressed portion 26, 37 of the can is maintained. Furthermore, the recessed rim 27 can be provided with an adhesive 34 in order to further secure said vacuum through increased adhesion between the rim 27 and the bead 32 of Jhe cover. The cover is provided with a tear-off flap 33, which causes said vacuum between the cover 24 and the depressed portion 26, 27 ofthe can to be eliminated when the flap is torn off. whereby the bead 32 is released from the recessed rim 27. allowing the cover 24 and its optional content (not shown) to be removed.

Thus, the present invention does not only make possible the covering ofthe pouring aperture of a beverage can, and the application of advertising or information on a cover which is located on the top or at the bottom ofthe beverage can 1 or in both places, but also allows the said covers to contain objects or samples in liquid or solid form. When supplying units in, e.g., three-packs, four-packs, six-packs or the like, it will be understood that it will be possible to attach beverage cans 1 and their respective covers 13, 13' to one another in a simple manner and also in this way ensure that the drinking edge is either covered or optionally can be cleaned with a wipe which is found in the cavity or recess ofthe cover.

In the solution shown in Figs. 19-21, the cover 13 is arranged to cover the depressed bottom portion 37 ofthe can. However, the cover 13 may conceivably instead cover the depressed top portion 6 ofthe can, as indicated in Fig. 7. The assembly ofthe can (1) and cover (13) is then surrounded by an upwardly open container 35, preferably made in the form of a drinking glass of plastic or glass. The drinking glass may be made of a transparent, translucent or opaque material. Like the can, the outer surface of the glass may optionally be provided with decoration, ornament, information or advertising material.

However, it is important that when storing the can 1 , the cover 13, and the glass 35 that dust and dirt do not enter the container in the space between the can/cover assembly and the inner wall ofthe container 35. Therefore, around a upper portion 35' ofthe container 35 there is provided a sealing means 36 which is detachable, e.g., by tearing off. The sealing means may, e.g., be a band of heat shrinkable material, a sealing sleeve, a sealing tape, e.g., an adhesive tape. The sealing means 36 rests in sealing contact with a peripheral portion 1 '" ofthe can 1 /cover 13 assembly, e.g., a portion 1 '" of the can as indicated in Fig. 20.

Although it is not shown in Figs. 19-21 , it will be understood that a type of cover as shown and described in connection with Figs. 1 to 15 or Figs. 16 to 18 could be provided in the recessed portion 6 ofthe can 1 or in the recessed portion 38 of the cover 13 depending upon whether it is the can 1 or the cover 13 which is uppermost in the can 1 /cover 13 assembly.

The solution shown in Fig. 19 is particularly advantageous in the cases where in a practical manner it is desirable to sell or distribute as a unit a can 1 containing a beverage, cover 13 containing another beverage or a foodstuff in solid form, e.g., peanuts, and a drinking glass 35.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO1998054061A1 *26 May 19983 Dec 1998Alain SavinoClosure cap for drink can
WO2001015976A2 *29 Aug 20008 Mar 2001Kestrel Communications LimitedHygienic cover for container
WO2001015976A3 *29 Aug 200020 Sep 2001Kestrel Comm LtdHygienic cover for container
WO2002070358A1 *1 Mar 200112 Sep 2002Ball Packaging Europe GmbhClosure lid with a dual mirror surface and the production thereof
WO2002100731A1 *11 Jun 200219 Dec 2002Hb Innovation Ltd.Combined beverage and snack or premium containers
WO2003035493A1 *23 Oct 20011 May 2003Gomez David BrionesCover for cans
WO2003066466A1 *29 Jan 200314 Aug 2003Pescaviar, S.L.Improved tin
WO2005092733A1 *18 Mar 20056 Oct 2005Thierry Jacques DrugeonHygienic seal for containers
WO2007007196A1 *12 Jul 200618 Jan 2007Chaparro Mario ValderramaPressure closure for beverage and food containers
WO2010070159A1 *24 Apr 200924 Jun 2010Gonzalez Sanchez Jose FranciscoProtector for containers
WO2012007496A1 *13 Jul 201119 Jan 2012Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Can cover - disc with slots
WO2013153529A2 *11 Apr 201317 Oct 2013Allan Robert MayAdvertising assembly
WO2013153529A3 *11 Apr 20139 Jan 2014Allan Robert MayAdvertising assembly
EP1312067A1 *13 Jul 200121 May 2003Creative Packaging Services Pty LtdPromotional system
EP1312067A4 *13 Jul 20019 Jun 2004Promotional Notions Pty LtdPromotional system
US624111426 May 19985 Jun 2001Alain SavinoClosure cap for drink can
US72785481 Mar 20019 Oct 2007Ball Packaging Europe GmbhClosure lid with a dual panel and the production thereof
US888194013 Jul 201111 Nov 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Can cover—disc with slots
Classifications
International ClassificationB65D23/12, B65D51/20, B65D51/24, B65D77/24, B65D71/50, B65D51/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65D23/12, B65D51/245, B65D2251/0018, B65D51/20, B65D2517/0014, B65D2517/0098, B65D71/502, B65D2251/0071
European ClassificationB65D51/20, B65D71/50B, B65D51/24F, B65D23/12
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