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Publication numberUS511139 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date19 Dec 1893
Filing date29 Dec 1892
Publication numberUS 511139 A, US 511139A, US-A-511139, US511139 A, US511139A
InventorsLewis W. Harper
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Unicycle
US 511139 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 Sh'ests -Sheet 1.

(No Model.)

L. W. HARPER.

UNIGYGLE.

Patented Dec. 19, 18.93.

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UNIGYGLE. 7 No. 511,139. Patented Dec. 19, 1893.

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L. W. HARPER.

UNIOYCLE.

No. 511,139. Patented Dec. 19,1893.

INVENTOI? BY kjw A TTOR/VEYS.

WITNESSES:

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. vision for a lateral movement of the rider,

' in'which similar figures of reference indicate V and improved Unicycle, of which the follow- ,center of the wheel and the wheel will be con- UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

LENIS HARPER, OF NEW YORK MILLS, MINNESOTA.

UNICYCLE.

SPECIFICATION forming partof Letters Patent No. 51 1,139, dated December 19, 1893.

SerialNo 456,677. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Beit known that I, LEWIS WILSON HARPER,

of New York Mills, in the county of Otter Tail and State of Minnesota, haveinvented a new ing, is a full, clear, and exact description.

My invention relates to improvements in pedal operated nnicycles; and the object of my invention is to produce a machine having but a single wheel and provided with oppositely arranged hubs, a suitable stationary frame arranged between the hubs and within the wheel on which the rider may sit, which is arranged so that the seat will be below the sequently easily balanced; which makes prowhereby the wheel may be caused to incline to one side and to turn readily; which is very light and strong in proportion to its size; which is constructed in such a way that practically no power is lost; which is made up in readily detachable sections so that the machine may be easily taken apart and packed and crated for shipment, and which in general is constructed so as to be especially adapted for rapid and easy propulsion.

To these ends my invention consists in certain features of construction and combinations of parts, as will be hereinafter described and claimed.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings forming apart of this specification,

corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the machine embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a sectional rear elevation of the same. Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail sectional View of that portion of the driving mechanism which is located at the hub of the machine, the section being taken on the line 3-3 in Fig. 1. Fig. at is a broken inside elevation of one of the hubs and of one end of the suspended frame connected with the hub. Fig. 5 is anenlarged detail sectional View, showing thelower portion of the driving mechanism, the view being taken on the line S -5 in Fig. 1. Fig.6 isa broken detail elevation of a portion of the lower driving mechanism and shows particularly the arrangement of one of the sliding guard plates on the suspended frame. Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional view of the saddle and its supporting mechanism. Fig. 8 is a detail sectional view, showing the bearing-of the crank shaft, the arrangement of the brake locks and the connection between the parallel inner rings and the main folly. Fig. 9 isa broken enlarged detail side elevation of one of the main handles and one of the brake handles, showing also the connection of said handles withthe frame. Fig. 10 is a detail side elevation of a portion of the frame, showing particularly the arrangementof the main and brake handles and the guides for the brake rods. Fig. 11 is a sectional plan on the line 11-11'in Fig. 9. Fig. 12 is a detail plan view of the socket plate on the back end and under side of the saddle. Fig. 13 is a detail longitudinal section of one of the joints in one of the wheel rings. Fig. 14: is a detail vertical section on the line l t-1 L in Fig. '7. Fig. 15 is a vertical cross section through the saddle clamp on the line 15-15 in Fig. 7; and Fig. 16 is a vertical cross section on the line 16-16 in Fig. 8.

The machine has a large wheel 9 which carries the entire mechanism, and this wheel is provided with a suitable tire, preferably some form of pneumatic tire 10, which is secured in a folly 11 of substantially the usual kind, the folly being hollow so as to give it the requisite lightness. The felly difiers from the ordinary felly, howeveigin that it is provided with.

several joints 12 which enable it to be taken apart and packed or crated, and the joints are formed by inserting a plug 11 in the abutting ends of the several sections and fats toning the sections to the plug, by means of set screws 13, as shown clearly in Fig. 8. The Wheel is also provided with parallel rings 14: which are arranged in difierent planes from the folly and on opposite sides of the plane of the folly, and the rings are also made up in sections which are united by a ferrule or sleeve 15, shown in detail in Fig. 13, this sleeve being oppositely screw threaded on its inner sides and near the ends and it screws .upon similarly threaded reduced portions of the rin s. The rings 14: are connected with preferably thickened, at the points where the spokes connect, to give them the necessary strength. The wheel is provided on opposite sides with hubs 17 which are somewhat dishing and have their convex sides outward, and these hubs connect with the outer portions of the wheel by spokes 18 which are arranged in pairs on opposite sides of the wheel and converge as they extend outward, the outer secto tions 19 of the spokes being bent somewhat sharply inward and firmly secured to the felly 11. The outer and inner sections of each spoke are connected by a joint 20, substantially like the joints of the rings 14 described I; above, so that the spokes may be readily taken apart when necessary. The inner ends of'the spokes are reduced, as shown at 21, thickened internally and screw threaded so as to be screwed into sockets 22 in the hub.

It will be seen that this construction of the spokes causes them to brace the folly and they also bear upon the outer portions of the rings 14 so as to strengthen the rings and the entire wheel.

2 5 On the inner face of each hub is a bevel gea'r'wheel 23 which is formed integral with the hub and which connects with the driving mechanism of the machine, in the manner hereinafter described. The hubs have a cen- 3o tral transverse opening to receive the axles 24, on which the frame of the machine is suspended, as described below, and each axle is provided with a circumferential groove 25, (see Fig. 3,) adapted to receive bearing balls 35 26 which are also held in a groove 27 formed opposite the groove and partly in the hub and partly in the inner end *of the tap or nut 28 which is screwed into the opening of the hub and which encircles the axle. This nut 40 is prevented from turning in relation to the hub by a key 29 which extends through a flange of the nut and into the hub.

Screwed into the outer end of each axle is a rod 30 and secured to the outer end of this 5 rod is a handle 31 by means of which the wheel may be held upright and moved about when it is not being ridden. The inner end of each axle 24 is formed as a head 32 which is secured to the upper end of the main frame 50 33; this frame is substantially of a U-shape,

and it is made of hollow pipe which is elliptic'al in cross section as shown in Fig. 11, and the-frame supports the saddle and the propelling mechanism in a manner hereinafter 55 described. The upper ends of the frame members are secured to the heads 32 of the axles by means of straps '34 which encircle the frame ends and which have end flanges 36 which enables them to be fastened to the 6c heads 32.

To prevent crushing and also to afiord a suitable bearing for the attached parts, cast ings are inserted in the upper ends of the frame 33. See Fig. 3. Extending longitudi- 6 5 nally through each side member of the frame 33'is a countersha'ft 37, which at its upper end is reduced, as shown at 38, and which projects upward from the frame, this reduced portion having a pinion 39 thereon which is fastened to the shaft by a key 40, and which engages and drives the cog wheel 23 of the hub 17, thus turning the main wheel. The shaft 37 is curved at the junction ofthe part 38 with the body of the shaft, as shown at 41, so as to form one portion of a' ball bearing against which the balls 42 bear, and the other half of the bearing is formed by the nut 43 which is screwed into the casting 35 and around the reduced end 38 of the shaft and which is held in place bya key 44. The pinion 39 is covered by aguard 45 of sheet metal which is screwed to the strap 34, as shown at 46 in Figs. '3 and 4. The driving con-nee 'tions at the lower end of each shaft 37 are shown clearly in Fig. 5. The shaft 37 has a reduced lower end 47 which turns in a suitable strengthening collar 48 held within the frame 33, and near the lower extremity of {the reduced end is a curved shoulder 49 which turns on the bearing balls 50, and these are held in a groove 51 of a casting 52 which 'is fastened firmly within the pipe portion of the frame 33 to form a bearing for the lower end of the shaft 37 and for the crank shaft which is also journaled in 'theframe. The reduced end 47 of the shaft 37 carries a pinion 53 which is held in place bya key '54, and above the pinion and on opposite sides of the frame member are openings 55 through which the key may be reached, and one of these openings, the inner one, is closed by a guard 55 which is screwed to the frame33-and it covers the opening-as well as the inner side of the pinion 53. The other opening 55 is closed by a vertically sliding guard plate 56, see Figs. 5 and 6, which plate has, near opposite edges, vertical slots 57 through whichextend screws 58, these being fastened to the frame 33 and by this means the plate is held in place and may be moved vertically to open or close the slot in the frame33. Theguard plate 56 has its upper edge turned out, as shown at 59, so as to form a handle by which it may be moved- The pinion 53 engages a bevel gear wheel 60 on a short shaft 61 which is journaled transversely in one side of the frame 33, and it will be understood that the arrangement shown in Fig. 5 is duplicated; that is, arranged on both sides of the frame. This shaft '61 turns in an opening in the casting 52, and is provided with two rows of bearing balls 63 which are arranged between the curved shoulders 62 of the shaft and the nuts 64 which embrace the shaft, and screw into opposite sides of the casting 52, the nuts being held in place by keys 65. On the inner ends of the crank shafts 61 are secured the outer ends of the bell-cranks 66, the cranks being held to the shaft by screws 67 whichprevent the cranks from slipping ofi the shafts, and also prevent them from turning on the shafts.- The cranks 66 are providedwith the usual pedals 68, and the inner ends of the cranks are secured to a short shaft 69 which turns in a bearing block 70 and in ball provided with a set screw 74 which is adapted to impinge upon and hold in place the saddle rod 75, see Fig. 7, and by means of" the set screw the saddle rod and saddle may be adjusted so as to hold the saddle at the right height. This saddle rod is a flat steel bar, see Figs. 7 and 14, and it is arranged so that its greatest width will be in the same plane as the rim ofthe wheel. This arrangement prevents the bar from bending backward and forward, but permits it to be bent sidewise when necessary so that the,

rider, by simply throwing his weight to one side or the other, will cause the saddle to swing outward so as to shift the center of gravity and this makes the wheel incline to one side and turn in the direction in which it tends to fall. The saddle rod 75 terminates at its upper end in ahead 7 6 which is socketed on the under side to receive the rod, and which is held to the rod by a set screw 77. The head 76 is also slotted horizontally near the top so as to receive the lower portion of,

the saddle spring 78, which spring is curved upward andrearward, as shown in Fig. 7, and is held in place by a set screw 79 which projects through one side of the head 76 and against the edge of the spring. The saddle 80 is carried by the upper portion of thespring 78, and it will be seen that by adjusting the spring back and forth in the head 7 6, thesaddle may be brought into the desired position. That portion of the spring 78 which lies beneath the centerofthe saddle, is curved downward, as shown at 78 in Fig.7, and the spring isheld to the front portion of the saddle by clamping. plates 81, see Fig. 15, whichare arranged on opposite sides of the spring and are forced firmly against it by bolts 82 which connect the plates and which are arranged above and below the spring. The upper bolt passes through ears 83 on the ring portion of the saddle, and by this means the front part of the saddle is held to the spring. The upper end and rear portion of the spring 78 terminates in an eye 84 which engages a bolt 85. on the under side of the socketplate 86,w hich plate is shown in detail in Fig. 12, and is provided with central perforations 87 to receive therivets bywhich it isfastened'to the sad dle, This socket plate 86 extends across the rear portion of the saddle and it is provided,

near opposite ends, with slots 88 in which the straps of a tool bag may be inserted.

The machine is provided with suitable brakes, which are made to bear on the rings l4, and the brake mechanism will be de-- scribed below. On the lower and substau; tially horizontal portion of the frame 33 and on opposite sides of the stem 72 above and a little inside of the rings 14, are slideways 89, see Figs. 8 and 16; which are secured to the frame by clips 90 which extend over the top of the frame, and the clips and slideways have meeting flanges 91 which are fastened together by suitable bolts. On the under side of the frame and held to move transversely of the machine in the slideways 89, are brake blocks 92, which have their faces adjacent to the rings 14 made concave, and these faces .are provided with shoes 93 which are preferably of hard rubber and which areletinto thebloeks, as shown clearly in Fig. 8. The

blocks are normally drawn toward each other,

and prevented from contacting with the rings,

bya spiral; spring 94 connected with each block, and stops 95 are arranged near the inner ends of the slideways and in the paths of the blocks to prevent the blocks from being withdrawn from the slideways. i

The blocks are operated by means of fiexible rods or wires 96 which extend outward and upward along the frame 33, each rod pass-'- .ing over guide pulleys 97 which are carried by plates 98 arranged at the angles of the frame. The plates have outwardly extending guides 99 for the rods, and the guides and pulleys keep the rods in the correct position for use. which are united by suitable couplings 96,

and the upper end of each rod connects witha stiif rod 100 which slides in a guide 101 on the inner side of the frame 33. The rod 100 terminates at its upper end in a handle 102,

see Figs. 9 and 10. The guide 101 has a.

screw shank 103, see Fig. 9, and the frame 33 has a vertical row of holes 101 adapted toreceive the shank, and in this way the handle may be arranged at any necessary'height.

The machine is providedwith main han dles 105 which are preferably like the ordinary spade handles and which project laterally from opposite members of the frame 33, as shown best in Figs. 9, 1G and 11. handle is secured between the ends of a semicircular band 106, which band has a central bolt 107 which projects through the flanges 108 of the clamping bands 109, and the opposite ends of the bands 109 areheld together by a bolt 110; these handles 105 come within easy reach of the rider, and by grasping them, he may hold himself steady in the machine and may also throw his weight from side to side when necessary in steering the machine. In operating this machine, the rider steps inside the wheel, seats himself upon the sad:

dle, grasps the handles 105, and turns the pedals 68 with hisfeet in the usual way. When the pedals are turned,the crank shafts 61 are turned, and the connecting gear mechanism which extends from the crank shafts to the this movement causes one or both of the blocks The rods 96 are made in sections,

Each

IIO

- claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A unicycle comprising a wheel having opposite hubs each provided with a gear wheel on its inner side, a U-shaped frame having axles projecting into the hubs of the wheels and by which it is suspended, pedal operated crank shafts journaled in the lower part of the frame, longitudinal shafts in opposite members of the frame,gearin g between the longitudinal shafts and the crank shafts, and pinions on the upper'ends of the said longitudinal shafts and meshing with the gear wheels of the hubs, substantially as described.

. 2. A unicycle, comprising a main wheel havingopposite and separate hubs, each with a gear wheel on its inner side, inwardly extending axles jo'urnaled in the hubs, a U-shaped frame clamped to the axles and suspended within the wheel, pedal-operated crank shafts journaled in the lower portion of the frame, shafts arranged longitudinally in opposite members of the frame and having ball bearings at their upperand lower ends, a gear connection between the frame shafts and the crank shafts, and pinions secured to the up-' inner ends, the strengthening castings arranged in the upper ends of the frame, the countershafts journaled longitudinally in the frame and geared to thewheel hubs, the coun-' tershafts being held to turn in ball bearings, the clamping bands fastened around the upper'ends of the frame and to the heads of the axles, and propelling mechanism carried by the frame and geared to the countershafts, substantially as described.

4. In a unicycle, the combination with the suspended frame, the countershafts arranged in the side members of the frame and geared to suitable propelling mechanism and to the main wheel, and the adjustable guard plate held to slide over openings in the frame adjacent to the gearing therein, substantially as described.

movement in the wheel, substantially as described.

6. The combination with the main wheel having suitable propelling mechanism, of the frame suspended within the main wheel, and an upwardly extending spring rod arranged to swing sidewise and provided with a saddle at its upper end, substantially as described.

7. In a unicycle, the combination with the main wheel, the frame suspended in the wheel and the propelling mechanism carried by the frame and geared to the wheel, of an upwardly extending stem secured to the main frame, a vertically adjustable rod carried by the stem and adapted to spring sidewise, and a saddle secured to the top of the rod, substantially as described.

8. The combination with the main wheel, the frame suspended within the wheel and the propelling mechanism carried by the frame and geared to the wheel, of an 'upwardly extending stem secured to the frame, a vertically adjustable spring rod secured in the stem and extending upward therefrom,

the rod being adapted to swing sidewise, the

saddle secured to the top of the rod, and handles arranged on opposite sides of the frame, substantially as described.

9. In a unicycle, the combination with the main wheel having the opposite parallel rings and the frame suspended within the wheel, of spring-repressed brake blocks held to slide on the frame and to contact with the rings, movable handles carried by the frame, and an operative connection between the handles and brake blocks, whereby the movement of the handles may throw the blocks into contact with the rings, substantially as described.

10. The combination with the mainwheel having parallel inner rings and the frame suspended within the wheel, of spring-repressed brake blocks held to slide on the under portion of the frame and provided with shoes to contact with the rings, the vertically movable handles held to slide in the upperportions of the frame, flexible rods connecting the handles and the brake blocks, and guides "for the .rods, substantially as described.

11. In a unicycle, the combination with a wheel having gear wheels on the inner faces of its hubs, of a U-shaped hollow frame, having axles projecting from its uppor end into the hubs of the wheel, crank shafts journaled in the lower part of the frame and each provided with a gear wheel on one end, and longitudinal shafts in the opposite members of the hollow frame, and provided with gear wheels at their upper ends meshing with the gear wheels of the hubs and with gear Wheels at their lower ends meshing with the gear wheels of the crank shafts, substantially as described.

12. In a unicycle, the combination with a wheel having gear wheels on the inner faces of its hubs, of a U-shaped hollow frame having axles projecting from its upper end into the hubs of the wheel, a saddle stem project ing from the central portion of the frame,]

the gear wheels of the hubs and with a gear 10 shafts mounted in the lower part of the frame wheel at its lower end meshing with the gear and each provided with apinion at one end, wheels of the crank shafts, snbstantlally as a shaft mounted in the 'saddle stem, cranks herein shown and deserlbed.

eonneetecl with the shafts in the frame and saddlestem and proyigled vith treadles, and longitudinal shafts in the opposite members of the hollow frame anti eaehprovided with a gear wheel at its upper end meshing with LEWIS W. HARPER. i

Witnesses:

S; F. SAWYER, ED OLEARY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2953394 *6 Feb 195820 Sep 1960Anderson Everett GOccupant propelled gyral wheel
US3290057 *15 Oct 19646 Dec 1966Turner Hoyt EOne wheel single rider vehicle of the amusement type
US4147343 *2 Jun 19783 Apr 1979Hyde Phillip RAcrobatic amusement device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B19/02