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Publication numberUS3721040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date20 Mar 1973
Filing date24 Feb 1971
Priority date24 Feb 1971
Also published asDE2207538A1
Publication numberUS 3721040 A, US 3721040A, US-A-3721040, US3721040 A, US3721040A
InventorsGoldfarb A
Original AssigneeGoldfarb A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanical doll
US 3721040 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. E. GCLDFARB MECHANICAL DOLL Much 20, 1973 Filed Feb; 24, 1911 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VENTOR.

ADOLPH E. GOLDFARB ROBERT M. ASHEN ATTORNE Y I Ma 2 3 I A. E; GOLDFARB 3,23,40

MECHANICAL DOLL Filed Feb. 24, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 10.,

INVENTOR. ADOLPH E. GO

ROBERT M. ASHEN United States Patent M 3,721,040 MESHANICAL DGLL Adolph E. Goldfarb, 4614 Monarca Drive, Tarzana, Calif. 91356 Filed Feb. 24, 1971, Ser. No. 118,388 Int. Cl. A63h 11/00 U.S. Cl. 46-419 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A mechanical doll in the shape of a human figure or robot having a lower body portion which may include a pair of legs supporting a movable upper body portion which has arms and a head disposed at the top thereof. Means is provided within the doll for selectively causing movement of the upper body portion of the doll relative to the stationary lower body portion, the doll being capable of a combination of movements in timed relation to achieve an orbital movement of a hand or hands of the doll. The doll may also be capable of providing a selected one of the motions, such as a side-to-side movement of the upper body relative to the lower body.

There have been a number of mechanized dolls or robots which have existed in the art for a great number of years. These dolls have for the most part provided a single motion or alternate motions. The combination of motions has been to a most limited extent, without positive coordination or synchronization to achieve a desired coordinated, lifelike movement of a more complex nature. Neither does it appear that any of the prior art devices provided a side-to'side motion of the upper portion of the body of the doll. One of the oldest references is seen in Pat. No. 1,183,510, wherein a member representing upper portion of a figure is caused to merely tilt backward and forward relative to a washboard. Another similar patent where a figure moves relative to a fixed washboard is seen in U.S. Pat. No. 1,447,410, where once again only a simple front-to-back movement of the torso relative to a fixed bottom portionis achieved.

In U.S. Pat. No. 2,691,845, an entire toy figure which is articulated is caused simply to move from side to side by an operating rod connected to the bottom portion thereof. As the rod is moved from side to side, the figure is caused to move therewith.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,128,575, a robot is seen wherein the body achieves a front to back motion. Additionally, its arms move in and out. The body and arm movements are uncoordinated or non-synchronized with no relation between these two different actions.

In order for a doll to be more lifelike, it is obviously desirable that it 'be capable of more complex, coordinated movements. In this connection, if movements canbe combined to produce movement of the upper portion of the body in a generally horizontal orbit, one could then position the arms of such a doll so as to effectively stir, mix or perform sweeping or other type functions when appropriate utensils are placed in the dolls hand or hands. I

The herein invention is illustrated in the preferred form of a mechanical doll which can be in the shape of a human figure or robot or other type of generally self-standing body. The figure has a lower body portion which can include a pair of legs. An upper body portIon is flexibly disposed above and connected to the lower portion so the upper body can move relative to the lower portion. The upper body preferably has a pair of arms and a head at the top thereof. Means is provided on the doll for selectively controlling the mechanism therein 3,721,040 Patented Mar. 20, 1973 to drive the doll in various motions. The doll of the invention is capable of rotating the hand of at least one of its arms in a generally horizontal orbit. This is achieved in the embodiments shown in the drawings by synchronizing two separate motions of the doll. By way of example, the drawings show a doll capable of providing a side-to-side movement of the upper body portion of the doll relative to the lower portion, and also providing a front-to-back relative tilting of that upper body portion. Thus, the combination in properly timed relationship of a side-to-side and a front to back motion at the upper end of the doll will produce the desired effect. Alternately, particular overall body motion may be combined with properly complementing arm motion, all of which is coordinated and in the proper timed relation to achieve the desired lifelike complex motion. It is further desirable that such dolls be capable of effecting individual or component motion only, as the child-user may determine in the course of play.

The arms of the illustrated dolls are preferably movable and separately adjustable to varying positions. If a broom or a spatula is placed in one of the dolls hands, the orbital motion would give the dolls hand a stirring or mixing effect. Such controlled orbital movement greatly extends the flexibility and utilization of the doll so that it can perform, by the use of various tools, utensils and accessories, numerous functions heretofore not obtainable, at least not in a comparable lifelike and natural manner. It is believed that the invention will be further understood from the following detailed description and drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a partially cross sectioned view of a first embodiment of a doll in this invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken generally along line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view taken generally along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIGS. 4a-4c disclose different relative positions of the control discs utilized in the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a partial cross sectioned view of a second embodiment of a doll of this invention.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken generally along line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a side sectional view taken generally along line 77 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view of a portion of the drive mechanism of the doll of FIG. 5.

FIG. 9 is a cross sectional view taken generally along line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIGS. l0a-10c illustrate different positions of the mechanism for driving the doll of FIG. 5.

Turning now to FIG. 1, there is seen a doll 11 utilizing a drive mechanism of a first embodiment of this invention. The doll 11 has a body 12 having a lower body portion 14 and a movable upper body portion 16. The lower body portion 14 has a pair of rigid legs 13 such that it can be self standing. The upper ends of the legs are aflixed to support an abdomen portion 15 of the lower body portion 14. Disposed above the abdomen portion 15 is a preferably hollow main torso portion 17 of the upper body portion 16 which is connected to the abdomen portion by a flexible section 20, generally at the waist of the doll. The flexible section 20 can be in the form of a bellows or the like formed of rubber, vinyl or other plastic that will serve both to support the upper body portion 16 and allow movement of that body portion relative to lower body portion 14. Aflixed to the upper torso portion 17 is a head 18 and arms 19 and 21 which can be separately and manually rotatable in sockets 23 where the arms adjoin that torso portion. Further, one arm 19' may have a pivot connection 25 in its elbow to allow further adjustment and movement of the arm. The hands 27 of the doll may be provided with apertures 29 to accommodate implements that may be placed in the dolls hands so that it can perform or simulate work functions when actuated.

'In the doll of the embodiment of FIG. 1, there is a housing 31 provided in the abdomen portion 15. The lower portion of the housing 31 contains a motor 33 and batteries 34 which serve to provide energy for the motor. A switch, not shown, at the rear of the doll can be utilized to actuate motor 33. Alternatively, a remote hand-held switch could be connected to the motor through wire leads. The motor 33 is disposed with its output shaft 36 extending vertically upwardly into the upper portion of the housing 31 where it is fixed to and drives a small gear 35. The smaller gear 35 is engaged with a large gear 37 mounted in the upper portion of the housing 31 for rotation about a vertical axis extending generally centrally of the doll. A rigid shaft 39 of a suitable material such as plastic or metal is affixed at its lower end 41 to a point adjacent the outer periphery of large gear 37. The shaft 39 is pivotally held at a medial point 43 by a ball 45 formed or mounted on the shaft 39. The ball 45 is seated within a socket 47 provided in a traverse upper wall 49 of the upper portion of the housing 31. Thus, point 43 is fixed against transverse movement, and the lower end 41 of the shaft 39 on the gear 37 describes an orbital motion about the vertical center line passing through point 43. A likewise orbital motion is produced at the opposite upper end 51 of the shaft 39. Thus, if the movable upper torso portion 17 was fully coupled to the upper end 51 of the shaft 39, the upper torso portion of the doll would also describe such a circular or orbital motion. However, an adjustable control means 53 is provided to selectively vary and control the extent to which the movable upper torso portion 17 is coupled to the shaft end 51.

The illustrated control means 53 includes a pair of rotatable horizontal discs 57 and 59 which can be selectively rotated to different positions to define the movement of the upper torso portion 17 of the doll. The discs 57 and 59 are mounted for rotation in a support block 61 that is affixed within the upper end of the torso portion 17 adjacent the arm sockets 23. The uppermost disc 57 has a larger diameter than the lower disc 59. This allows a portion of the circumference of disc 57 to protrude through an aperture 63 at the rear of the doll (FIG. 2). A knurled surface 65 on the circumference of the disc 57 allows the child to rotate that disc within the support block 61. The lower disc 59 preferably has at least three raised bearingprotrusions 67 on which the upper disc 57 is supported and can rotate. The bearing-protrusions 67 can be in the form of dome shaped elements integrally formed on the disc 59 which may be molded of plastic or formed of other suitable material. Obviously, a separate ball bearing element also can be utilized to allow relative rotation of the two discs. Discs 57 and 59 have slots 69 and 71, respectively, extending therethrough. The slots 69 and 71 pass through the centers of the discs and are of sufficient width to accommodate the diameter of the shaft 39. The slots 69 and 71 will selectively allow free movement of the upper end 51 of the shaft 39 relative to the upper torso portion 17 or restrict such relative movement in one or more directions to in effect couple the upper torso to the shaft upper portion for common movement in the direction or directions of the restriction. This will be explained further below.

In the operation of the doll, the upper larger disc 57 is rotatable through 180. The lower disc 59, however, is rotatable only through 90. The limitation on the rotation of the upper disc 57 is achieved by the use of a tabular extension 72 on the upper disc opposite end portions 74 and 78 .on support block 61. The 90 limitation on the rotation of the lower disc 59 is achieved by the utilization of a stop pin 73 fixed to housing 61 and two radially extending tabular extensions 75 and 76 on the lower disc 59, and spaced 90 apart around its periphery, as seen in F GS. 2 a d 3. The tabular ex ensio s 75 a d 76 h e indentations 80 to receive the pin 73 and assure alignment of the slots 69 and 71. The pin 73 extends. upwardly from the center front of the interior wall of the housing 61 on which the lower disc 59 is rotatably supported, and thus extends into the path of the extensions 75 and 76. Further, the lower disc 59 has an indent 79 formed on its outer periphery (FIG. 2). The indent 79 is engageable by a resilient pin 81 (FIG. 1) which depends downwardly from upper disc 57, to releasably interconnect the discs 57 and 59 for common rotation.

In describing the operation of the doll, attention is directed to FIGS. 2 and 4a where discs 57 and 59 are coaligned. That is, the two slots 69 and 71 in the discs are coaligned with each other in a direction parallel to the front and back of the doll. The upper end 51 of the shaft 39 describes an orbit in accordance with the rotation of end 41 on gear 37. This causes the shaft end 51 to react against the sides of the slots 69 and 71 to force the discs to move from front to back together with upper portion of the body. In other words, the coaligned discs do not resist the side-to-side portion of the movement of end 51 of the shaft, thus, the doll will not move from side to side. The front-to-back portion of the orbital movement of the shaft is resisted, and thus this movement is imparted to the upper portion of the doll. When the upper disc 57 is rotated clockwise (as seen from the top view in FIG. 2) from the position of FIGS. 2 and 4a, disc 59 will move therewith due to the engagement of the pin 81 with the indent 79. The two discs will move until extension 76 on the lower disc 59 engages the pin 73. In this position shown in FIG. 4b, the two slots 69 and 71 extend perpendicular to the starting position of FIG. 2. The two slots will thus be coaligned in a direction parallel to the sides of the doll. They thereby produce only side-to-side movement of the upper body portion due to the above mentioned effect of the discs resisting side movement of the end 51 of the shaft but not resisting its front-to-back movement. Further rotation clockwise of the upper disc 57 forces the pin 81 to disengage from the indent 79, since as noted above, the lower disc is stopped from further movement by pin 73. The upper disc 57 can then be rotated an additional 90 to the position as seen in FIG. 40, where the two slots 69 and 71 are perpendicular to each other. This will provide both side-to-side and frontand-back movement of the upper portion of the doll. The upper disc 57 cannot rotate past the final position shown in FIG. 4c because of the engagement of tabular portion 72 striking portion 78 on support block 61.

The use of a single drive motor or means 33 together with the single shaft 39 aid in effecting a synchronization of the front-to-back and side-to-side movements to achieve the desired orbital hand movement of the doll. If these separate movements were not so synchronized, the desired orbital movement would not result or would be negligible or erratic with one or the other motion predominating.

Turning now to FIGS. 5-10, there is seen a second embodiment of the invention to achieve the same overall effect. The doll 82 of FIG. 5, has the same body 12 as the doll of FIG. 1. That is, the cavity or shell is identical, and a lower body portion 14 supports and is connected to an upper body portion 16 by a flexible section 20. The difference between the dolls relates solely to the internal mechanism to control the movement of the upper body portion 16.

The doll 82 has a housing 83 within the abdomen portion 15 thereof which contains batteries (not shown). Within the upper torso portion 17 of the movable upper body portion 16, there is a support frame 87 which is mounted on the housing 83 for side-to-side movement. The frame 87 has two sidewalls 89 and 91, a rear wall 93, and with a bottom wall 95. Extending downwardly from the bottom wall are two tabular extensions 97 and 99 at the center, front and back of the doll, respectively (FIG. 7). The extensions 97 and 99 are pivotally mounted on the housing 83 as by suitable pins 101 (FIG. 7) for rota.

tion about a horizontal axis 98 (FIG. extending front to back centrally of the upper end of the housing 83. The frame 87 is supported with its bottom wall 95 spaced above the housing 83 to afford room for the side-to-side movement of the frame. A generally U-shaped spring element 103 disposed between the bottom wall 95 and the top of housing 83 acts to maintain the upper torso portion 17 in a generally upright vertical position as shown in FIG. 5. As can be seen, the frame 87 is capable of sideto-side movement upon rotation of the tabular extensions 97 and 99 about the pins 101, forcing the spring element 103 to depress in accordance with the side-to-side movement.

As shown best in FIG. 6, within the frame 87, there is attached a three-walled housing 105 which serves to support the mechanism for causing movement of the doll. The housing 105 has side walls 107 and 109, and a rear wall 111 attached to the front side of rear wall 93 of frame 87. Secured in the housing 105 is an electric motor 113 that is powered by the batteries within the housing 83 through suitable connection wires 114 (FIG. 5). A switch at the rear of the doll or affixed to extension leads (not shown) may be manually operable to activate and deactivate the motor 113. Motor 113 has a horizontally extending output shaft which is fixed to and drives a small gear 115. Small gear 115 engages a large gear 117 of a speed reducing gear train. Large gear 117 is integrally formed with a small gear 119, which in turn engages a larger gear 121 mounted on a horizontal shaft 123 rotatably mounted between housing side walls 107 and 109. A small gear 125, also fixed on shaft 123, in turn engages a large gear 127 mounted on a second horizontal shaft 131, also rotatably mounted between housing side walls 107 and 109. Also fixed on the shaft 131 is an elongated gear 129 which is the output gear of the gear reduction train. The gear 129 engages a large gear 133 of a shiftable drive assembly 116. The gear 133 is sandwiched between and rigidly affixed to two side plates 135 and 137. Integrally formed with or secured to the plates 135 and 137 are hollow cylindrical sleeves 139 and 141, respectively. Thus, the shiftable drive assembly 116 is comprised of gear 133, plates 135 and 137, and sleeves 139 and 141. The assembl 116 is rotatably and shiftably mounted on a stationary horizontally extending axle 143 that extends between the side plates 107 and 109. Thus, the motor 113 drives the shiftable drive assembly 116; the assembly 116 may be selectively shifted to either drive the means which moves the upper body portion from side to side, or to drive the means which moves that upper body portion from front to back, or to simultaneously drive both of such body movement producing means.

More particularly, sleeves 139 and 141 rotate on axle 143 as parts of drive assembly 116, and are also free to slide as part of that assembly in either direction along the axle 143. The sleeves 139 and 141, each have an extension 145 and 147, respectively, integrally formed therewith, extending outwardly away from the gear 133. The axle 143 also supports for rotation thereon, a pan of bushings 149 and 151. The bushings 149 and 151 are disposed at either end of the axle 143 as seen in the enlarged view of FIG. 8. In addition, bushings 149 and 151 are fixedly spaced apart as shown in that figure and have receptacles 153 and 154 respectively formed therein, which will receive the extensions 145 and 147 respectively, of the sleeves 139 and 141.

The mechanism is arranged as shown in FIG. 8' so that either bushing 149 or 151 can be independently driven by the drive assembly 116 by shifting that assembly toward and into engagement with the desired bushing, 149 or 151, or the assembly may be centrally positioned to engage and drive both bushings. In other words, a clutch-type mechanism is provided. More particularly, the spacing between the bushings 149 and 151, the length of the sleeves 139 and 141, and extensions 145 and 147 are such that when the drive assembly 116 is fully to the left so that extension is seated fully within the receptacle 153 of the bushing 149, as shown in FIGS. 5, 6, 8 and 10a, there is no engagement between the extension 147 and the bushing 151. Alternatively, however, when the drive assembly 116 is moved fully to the right as illustrated in FIG. 10b, the extension 147 engages fully the receptacle 154 of the bushing 151, but the extension 145 clears the bushing 149. When, however, the assembly 116 is moved to a center position, the extensions 145 and 147 will be partially seated in receptacles 153 and 154 respectively as shown in FIG. 10c, and both bushings 149 and 151 will be rotatably driven. The effect of this will be further explained.

The shifting movement of the drive assembly 116 along the axle 143 can be effected by a lever 155 which is pivotally mounted in the center rear of the walls 93 and 111 adjacent gear 133. The lever 155 is pivoted intermediate its ends on a vertical axis, and its rear end extends out from the rear of the doll through an opening 157 (FIG. 6). The lever 155 can have a U-shaped jaw 159 at its forward end which surrounds the peripheral portion of the gear 133 while allowing the gear to rotate between the two teeth of the jaw. Movement of the rear end of the lever 155 toward one side causes the jaw 159 to move toward the other side to engage the gear 133 and move or shift it and the rest of the assembly 116 along the axle 143.

When the drive assembly 116 is moved to the far right as shown in FIG. 10b, to transmit rotation to bushing 151, the upper body portion of the doll moves from side to side only. Bushing 151 has an extension through the side wall 109 which has an enlarged cylindrical portion 175. A pin 177 is affixed to the outside of the portion 175 adjacent its outer periphery and extends outwardly. The pin 177 will move in an eccentric motion when cylindrical portion 175 rotates. A rigid, generally vertical, rod 179 is pivotally connected at its upper end to the pin 177. The rod 179 pivots front to back about horizontal transverse axis of the pin 177. Rod 179 extends downwardly from the pin 177 to its lower end where it is connected by a pin 181 to the housing 83 in the lower body portion 14 of the doll below its flexible waist section 20. The lower end of the rod 179 is pivotally connected for side-to-side rotation about the frontto-back horizontal axis of the pin 181. As the pin 177 moves in a circular eccentric motion, its distance from the pin 181 increases and decreases, depending upon the position of the pin 177 in its orbital movement. However, since the rigid rod 179 of fixed length ties the two pins 181 and 177 together, the right side (as viewed in FIG. 5) of the pivoted frame 87, is alternately pulled closer to the pin 181 and then forced further away. This pivoting takes place about the front-to-back central axis 98 where tabular extensions 97 and 99 are pivotally mounted. Side-to-side movement of the frame 87 is transmitted to the upper body portion 16 through side plates and 167 connected to the frame 37 and secured to or abutting the inside of that body portion. When the pin 177 travels to its uppermost position, the doll will lean to the right (as viewed in FIG. 5). Alternatively, when the pin 177 travels to its lowest position, the doll will lean to the left. FIG. 5 shows the doll in its normal intermediate or upright position, leaning neither to the right or to the left.

When the drive assembly 116 is shifted to the far left as shown in FIG. 10a, the extension 145 is in complete engagement with the receptacle 153 of bushing 149 and the upper body portion of the doll will be caused to move from front to back only. This is accomplished by transmitting front-to-back movement from the frame 87 to a pair of outer side plates or walls 165 and 167 pivotally mounted on the frame 87. The walls 165 and 167 in turn pass along the back-to-front movement of the upper body portion of the doll.

More particularly, the bushing 149 transfers rotation to an enlarged cylindrical portion 161 to which it is secured for common rotation. The portion 161 which extends through and is rotatable in side walls 107 and 89, has a pin 163 atfixed adjacent its outer periphery and extending outwardly from the side Wall 89. Thus when the pin 163 is being driven it moves in a circular path about a transverse horizontal axis, generally like the motion of pin 177 when it is being driven.

In the construction of the doll of this embodiment, the two outer side plates 165 and 167 are disposed adjacent and parallel to the outside of the walls 89 and 91 of the frame 87. The plates 165 and 167 are pivotally connected adjacent their base by pins or screws 169 to the frame 87. Thus, the upper portions of the outer plates 165 and 167 can move or pivot front to back relative to the frame 87 as illustrated by broken line in FIG. 7. The front-to-back movement of the square corners of the upper ends 171 of the plates 165 and 167 within the torso cavity, can serve to force the upper torso portion 17 to move from front to back. Alternately, the upper ends 171 of the plates 165 and 167 can be afiixed to the upper torso portion of the doll in the shoulder region to effect the frontto-back motion. It can be appreciated that the frame 87 cannot move from front to back due to the extensions 97 and 99 restraining this motion. Thus, the frame 87 and the parts it supports including the gears and the motor remain stationary, when the outer side plates 165 and 167 are pivoted front-to-back. In order to achieve this motion, one of the outer plates, 165, is in driven engagement with the pin 163. More particularly, the pin 163 is seated in a generally vertical slot 173 formed in the plate 165. Since the pin 163 follows a circular path when bushing 149 is driven to rotate portion 161, the pin 163 will move up and down in the slot 173 while causing the plate 165 to move from front-toback about the pivot adjacent its lower end. The driven plate 165 may be rigidly connected to the other outer plate 167 by suitable means (not shown) so that plate 167 will move front-to-back with plate 165.

FIG. c depicts the engagement of both receptacles 153 and 154 of bushings 149 and 151 simultaneously. This is achieved when the drive assembly 116 is in a medial or center position, with the lever 155 extending normally from the rear of the doll. In the instance where both of the bushings 149 and 151 are drivingly engaged, it is apparent that the upper body portion 16 of the doll will move both front-to-back and side-to-side to achieve an effective orbital or rotary motion of that body portion and of the arms affixed thereto, whereby an implement in the dolls forwardly extending hand will have imparted to it a horizontally orbiting or stirring motion.

What is claimed is:

1. A mechanical doll comprising:

a body having a lower body portion and an upper body portion supported on said lower body portion and articulated at a medial section for movement relative to said lower body portion,

unitary internal drive means contained entirely within said body for causing at least part of said upper body portion to simultaneously achieve two different synchronized movements, oscillatory means connected to said drive means to be oscillated thereby in a given oscillatory motion, and

translatory means arranged between said oscillatory means and said upper body portion and adapted to convert at least some of said oscillatory motion into responsive oscillation of parts of said upper body portion.

2. The combination as recited in claim 1 wherein:

said upper body portion includes at least one arm terminating in an outer extremity, and wherein is included means in said body for causing said outer extremity of said arm to move in a generally horizontal orbit.

3. The doll of claim 2 wherein said entire arm is caused to move when achieving said horizontal orbit.

4. The doll of claim 2 wherein said entire arm moves as a unit.

5. The doll of claim 3 wherein:

said upper body portion includes an upper torso portion and,

said means in said body causes at least said upper torso portion to cooperatively move to achieve said horizontal orbit.

6. A mechanical doll as recited in claim 1 further comprising:

means in said body for causing at least a portion of said upper body portion to move from side to side in combination with an additional separate movement of a portion of said doll.

7. The doll of claim 1 further comprising:

means in said doll for selectively causing one movement alone or both together in timed relation to one another.

8. A doll as recited in claim 1 wherein said translatory means comprises shaft means connected to control said upper body oscillation, and

a plurality of slotted disc means mounted to define and limit the oscillation of said shaft means; said disc means being selectively rotatable to so define said oscillation.

9. The combination as recited in claim 1 wherein said translatory means comprises oscillating shaft means arranged to be driven by said drive means, a plurality of detent means mounted conjunctively with said shaft means to be oscillated therewith and a plurality of slotted connector means, each mounted to be selectively translated into driven relation with a respective one of said detent means and arranged to transmit its oscillation to an associated oscillatable portion of said upper body portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,958,144 11/1960 Stranges et al 46-119 X 2,691,845 10/1954 Jepson 46-1l9 X 2,637,936 5/1953 Dale et a1 461l9 X LOUIS G. MANCENE, Primary Examiner D. L. WEINHOLD, Assistant Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4006555 *11 Jun 19758 Feb 1977General Mills Fun Group, Inc.Doll with incrementally movable arm
US4422261 *30 Jun 198227 Dec 1983Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Toy capable of pivotal movement on a support surface
US64163805 Jan 20019 Jul 2002Blue Ridge Designs Inc.Motion toy
US7731560 *31 May 20078 Jun 2010Rehco, LlcMotorized interactive figure
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/354
International ClassificationA63H13/04, A63H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/04
European ClassificationA63H13/04