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Publication numberUS3709556 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date9 Jan 1973
Filing date16 Oct 1970
Priority date16 Oct 1970
Publication numberUS 3709556 A, US 3709556A, US-A-3709556, US3709556 A, US3709556A
InventorsE Allard, C Allard
Original AssigneeE Allard, C Allard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescoping i v pole attachment and wheel chairs
US 3709556 A
Abstract
A holder for containers of liquids for intravenous feedings for attachment to portable patient conveyances such as wheel chairs and gurneys consisting of an elongated tubular base, brackets for attachment to the frame of the conveyance, a plurality of elongated tubular extension members arranged for telescoping registration within the base and a hook shaped member mounted on the distal end of the uppermost telescoping member for holding the intravenous feeding container.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0 United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,709,556 Allard et al. 1451 Jan. 9, 1973 1541 TELESCOPING I V POLE 2,409,843 10/1946 Feucht ..248/l25 x ATTACHMENT AND WHEEL CHAIRS 2.370.534 3/1349 gcudder ..5/92 X 2, 73,0 3 /l 59 arogana ..248/l25 [761 fl'" u' 9 A Pea", 2,957,187 10/1960 Raia ..248/125 x i g i 5 6 i 3,185,422 5/1965 Spindler ..248/l24 ar 1c ory venue, an Leandro, Calif- 94579 Primary Examiner-Chancellor E. Harris 2 Filed; Oct 16, 1970 Attorney-Milmore & Cypher [21] Appl. No.: 81,329 [57] ABSTRACT A holder for containers of liquids for intravenous [52] US. Cl ..297/l88, 248/125, 248/226 R, feedings for attachment to portable patient com 297/DIG- 4 veyances such as wheel chairs and gurneys consisting [51] Int. Cl ..A47c 7/62 of an elongated tubular base brackets for attachment [58] Field of Search .248/226 R, 124, 125; to the frame of the conveyance, a plurality of 610m 297/DIG' 5/317 317 92 gated tubular extension members arranged for telescoping registration within the base and a hook [561 References C'ted shaped member mounted on the distal end of the up- UNITED STATES PATENTS permost telesooping member for holding the in- 8 H4 8/1905 R th 1 5/317 R X travenous feeding container. 79 osen a 866,522 9/1907 Scanlon ..5/3l7 R 2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTED JAN 9 I975 SHEET 1 OF 2 fl A N LLE L AA ED 58, 5 m L A Z W lllllIlI-Illll'lllll Illll PATENTEDJAH 9 197a SHEET 2 OF 2 L-UGEA/E ,Q A 1. 1. Agog 01m 2455 0. 444,420

INVENTORS 147' T ORA/f Y5 TELESCOPING I V POLE ATTACHMENT AND WHEEL CHAIRS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Equipment used in intravenous feedings presently consists of intravenous holders, hereinafter referred to as IV holders, which are essentially a fixed length pole with a hook for attachment of the container. These IV holders are attached to beds and other stationary equipment. Increased use of intravenous feedings of patients, particularly while in transit or while waiting on movable apparatus has resulted in mounting the IV poles on three wheeled dollys which are held by the wheel chair patient as he is pushed along. Accidental tip overs of the IV holder while the patient is receiving fluids is traumatic to both the patient and to the hospital attendants. Use of an additional hospital attendant to carry the IV bottle while the patient is wheeled to an emergency room, the X-ray room or other portion of the hospital is expensive and wasteful of medical personnel.

Present fixed length IV holders whether they be attached to wheel chairs or gurneys must be removed from the equipment to travel through low doorways, entry into ambulanaces and passenger automobiles at great inconvience to the patient and attending personnel and often at some risk to the patient where time is of the essence.

Removal of IV holders from mobile conveyances carries with it the usual problems of storage of the IV holder when not in use, and immediate retrieval when an emergency occurs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The essence of the present invention is the provision of a telescoping IV pole and holder and the novel means of attachment of the pole to the portable hospital equipment.

An object of the present invention is to provide an IV holder which is adjustable in height, folds out of the way when not in use, is adaptable to a wide variety of different wheel chairs and gurneys yet is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and install.

Another object is to provide an IV holder which cannot be accidentally pulled apart and yet can be adjusted to an infinite number of positions.

Still another object is to provide an IV holder for a wheel chair which can be folded with the chair without removing it from the chair, and can be mounted on either side of the chair.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an IV holder constructed in accordance with the present invention and mounted on a wheel chair. The broken lines show the IV holder in an extended position.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view showing the IV holder of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale with portions of the wheel chair shown in broken line for purposes of illustrating the attachment more clearly.

FIG. 3 is a cross section of a portion of the device taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross section of a portion of an alternative form of the device taken substantially along the line 4-4 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternative form of the invention showing an IV holder attached to a hospital gurney which is outlined in broken line. A portion of the IV holder is shown in broken line showing it in an extended position. An arrow also shows the manner of folding the IV holder out of the way when not in use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS.

The IV holder of the present invention consists briefly of an elongated tubular base 2 attached to a portable patient conveyance such as a wheel chair 1. A plurality of elongated tubular extension members 3 and 4 are arranged for telescoping registration within the base. A hook shaped member 6 mounted on the distal end 7 of the uppermost telescoping member holds the intravenous feeding container.

The tubular telescoping members may have any cross-sectional shape such as square, round or triangular as long as the lower members have open passages into which the next succeeding member can be registered within. The number of members is of no importance and it has been found that two extensions fitting within one base is sufficient for most purposes. The base and extensions are preferably made of metal which can be plated for ease of maintenance and for esthetic considerations.

In order to prevent accidental disassembly of the IV holder, the upper ends 8 and 9 of the base and middle extension member respectively are constricted in diameter while the lower ends of the upper and middle extension are expanded as shown at 11 in FIG. 3. Thus, as shown in FIG. 3, the neck portion 12 is stopped by the neck portion 13 and the two extensions are prevented from separating.

The constriction and expansion of portions of the extensions not only prevents accidental disassembly but also serves as part of the adjustment mechanism. As shown in FIG. 3 which is typical, an internally threaded nut 14 is attached as by welding to the exterior of an extension member, just below the constricted portion. An opening 16 is made in the extension member and a threaded bolt 17 with a manually engageable wing type finger hold 18 engages the extension member in a frictional grip. In like manner, threaded bolt 21 with wing finger hold 22 is threadably received on nut 23 and frictionally engages the upper extension member.

The IV holder is attached to the wheel chair in a very novel manner. All standard wheel chairs have bottom frame members 26 and 27 which extend rearwardly. These frames are provided with rubber end cups 28 and 29 which are removable and replaceable. The purpose of this portion of the frame is to permit the toe to be placed against the end to tilt the wheel chair backwardly to negotiate curbs and other obstructions. The IV holder is provided with a tubular member 31 which slides over the frame and locks in place by means such as a threaded bolt 32 fitted with a finger engageable wing member 33 which is threaded onto an internally treaded nut 34 attached to the tubular member which is angularly attached to the base of the IV holder. As may be seen in FIG. 1, the cap is removed, the tubular attachment member is slid onto the frame and the end 36 bears against the frame and frictionally holds the IV holder.

FIGS. 4 and 5 show an alternate form of the invention in which the IV holder is attached to a hospital gurney 41. The telescoping portion is identical to the previously described IV holder and consists of an elongated tubular base 1' and a plurality of elongated tubular extension members 3 and 4 The gurney IV holder has an additional extension member 5. A hook shaped member 6' is mounted on the distal end 7 of the uppermost telescoping member and an additional hook shaped member 6a may also be provided.

The tubular telescoping members may have any crosssectional shape such as square, round or triangular as long as the lower members have open passages into which the next succeeding member can be registered within. The base and extensions are preferably made of metal which can be plated for ease of maintenance and for esthetic considerations.

In order to prevent accidental disassembly of the IV holder, the upper ends 8', 9' and 10 of the base and two inner extensions respectively are constricted in diameter while the lower end of the extensions are expanded as shown at 11 in FIG. 4. Thus, as shown, the neck portion 12' is stopped by the neck portion 13' and the extensions are prevented from separating.

As set forth previously, the constriction and expansion of portions of the extensions not only prevents accidental disassembly but also serves as part of the adjustment mechanism. As shown in FIG. 4 which is typical, an internally threaded nut 14' is attached as by welding to the exterior of an extension member, just below the constricted portion. An opening 16 is made in the extension member and a threaded bolt 17 with a manually engageable wing type finger hold 18' engages the extension member in a frictional grip. In like manner, threaded bolt 2l' with wing finger hold 22' is threadably received on a nut, not shown, and frictionally engages the extension member immediately above the base. Also in like manner a threaded wing shaped finger hold 10a holds the uppermost member.

The IV holder is attached to the gurney so that when it is not in use, it can be retracted into the base member and swung into a position below the table portion completely out of the way. The foregoing is accomplished by providing a pair of offset stub members 42 and 43 longitudinally spaced along the base member and extending angularly therefrom, as for example at right angles, as shown in FIG. 5. The stub members are rotatably connected to a leg 44 of the gurney by clamps 46 and 47 which encircle the leg and are attached to the stub members by rivets 48 and 49. The clamps fit snugly on the leg of the gurney but with enough freedom to permit rotation of the clamp upon the leg. The lower clamp rests on a strut 51 of the gurney to maintain the elevation of the clamp. In order to prevent the IV holder from swinging freely about the gurney leg, a threaded nut 52 is welded to the clamp and a threaded bolt 53 with a finger hold 54 frictionally engages the leg of the gurney through an opening in the wall of the clamp.

The operation of the IV holder on the gurney is as follows: When not in use, the holder is stored beneath the table of the gurney as shown in solid lines in FIG. 5. When needed, the holder is rotated about the gurney leg as shown by the double headed set of arrows 56 by loosening the clamping screw frictionally in contact with the gurney leg and manually swinging the: holder.

The clamp on the gurney leg may be re-tightened at this point or after the holder members are extended. Next, the hook for holding the IV container is raised to the proper elevation by loosening the finger screws of each of the extension members and pulling them out to the desired point and then re-tightening the screws. The IV hook may be rotated to the desired position and then the uppermost clamp set to prevent further rotation. Double headed arrows 57 show the direction of extension and contraction of the telescoping members.

Operation of the IV holder on the wheel chair is similar to that of the Gurney except that the holder does not need to rotate about the frame of the chair. As earlier stated, however, the placement of the holder on the chair is such that it does not prevent folding of the wheel chair. Applicants have attached the upper end of the holder to the chair by means of a bracket 58 which encircles the base of the holder and has a leg 59 formed with an opening which registers with the bolt hole in the standard wheel chair back frame 61 so that the same threaded bolt 62 serves to both hold the IV holder on the chair and to hold the back 63 of the wheel chair to the frame. If it is desired to attach the holder to the other side of the chair, the tubular member 31 is merely slipped over the bottom frame member 26 of the chair and the bracket 62 is attached by threaded bolt 64 to the other side of the chair.

The IV holder, because of its versatility and convenience has already proven to be of great benefit to patients who required transfusions or intervenous feedings while being transported by gumeys and wheel chairs. Hospitals have found that it has decreased the need for extra personnel in emergency situations and has contributed thereby to the cost savings in operating their emergency rooms and moving of patients.

We claim:

1. A demountable IV holder for a collapsible wheel chair comprising:

a. an elongated tubular base;

b. a tubular sleeve integrally connected to the lower end of said base and adapted for sliding onto a stub end of a tubular frame member of said wheel chair, said sleeve carrying a threaded screw clamp adapted for frictional engagement with a selected portion along said tubular frame member of said wheel chair;

c. a bracket member slidably connected to the upper portion of said base member and having an extension member adapted for connection to the seat back frame upright member of said wheel chair;

d. a plurality of elongated tubular extension members arranged for telescoping registration within said base;

e. means selectively holding said tubular extension members at varying elevations above said base; and

f. a hook shaped member mounted on the distal end of the uppermost telescoping member adapted for holding an intervenous feeding container.

2. An IV holder for a wheel chair as described in claim 1 comprising:

a. each of said extension members having an enlarged elongated portion adjacent their lower end for registering receipt within the next lower adjoining extension member;

b. the base member and intermediate extension bers; and

members being formed with an elongated conc. screw clamps attached to said base and interstricted neck portion adjacent their upper ends mediate extension members for selective frictional proportionately sized to restrict passage of said eng g e i the mating eXlenSiOn be s larged end portions of adjoining extensio 5 forholding said extension members at infinite bers and to slidably fit in close relationship the p smaller portions of said adjoining extension mem-

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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/188.2, 297/DIG.400, 248/125.1
International ClassificationA61G7/05, A47C7/62, A61M5/14, A61G5/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61G5/10, Y10S297/04, A61G7/0503, A61M5/1415
European ClassificationA61M5/14R2, A61G5/10, A61G7/05H