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Publication numberUS3653707 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date4 Apr 1972
Filing date3 Oct 1969
Priority date3 Oct 1969
Publication numberUS 3653707 A, US 3653707A, US-A-3653707, US3653707 A, US3653707A
InventorsOlson Earl J, Pile Frank L
Original AssigneeLibbey Owens Ford Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flat glass shipping case
US 3653707 A
Abstract
A reusable case for shipping and storing frangible sheets. The case is formed from stock components which can be assembled in various ways so as to accommodate different numbers of sheets of various dimensions, and can be readily dismantled to form a compact unit for return shipment.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent 1151 3,653,707

Pile et al. 1 Apr. 4, 1972 [54] FLAT GLASS SHIPPING CASE 2,305,405 12/1942 Burrell ..214/10.s [72] Inventors: Frank L. Pile, Manteca; Earl J. Olson, at???" Lathropy both of Calif. g

[73] Assignee: Libbey-Owens-Ford Company, Toledo, FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Ohm 1,405,317 5/1965 France ..294/67 [22] Filed: Oct. 3, 1969 Primary Examiner-Even C. Blunk [2]] App! 863341 Assistant Examiner-Johnny D. Cherry Attorney-Collins and Oberlin [52] U.S. Cl ..294/67 D, 214/105 R, 294/67 R 51 int. Cl. ..B66c 1/16 ABSTRACT [58] Field of Search "294/ Z" ?i 2 1 2 A reusable case for shipping and storing frangible sheets. The

' case is formed from stock components which can be assembled in various ways so as to accommodate different numbers [56] References Cited of sheets of various dimensions, and can be readily dismantled UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1893 Megquier ..2l4/10.5

to form a compact unit for return shipment.

9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEBAPR 41912 SHEET E OF 3 (O O N I\ I X k 2 INVENTOKS. flank L 7 6e and By 63 M 0690/0 oa'ns {Obera'm ATTORNEYS FLAT GLASS SHIPPING CASE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates broadly to shipping apparatus for sheets or plates of glass or the like, and more particularly to a shipping case formed of stock elements which can be readily assembled in different relative positions so as to accommodate sheets in varying numbers and of varying dimensions.

2. Description of the Prior Art In shipping large sheets of glass from the producer to consumer outlets, it has heretofore been the practice to enclose the sheets in a protective wooden case constructed specifically for the particular shipment. Such cases require relatively large amounts of material and labor in their construction and, since they are generally not reusable, constitute a major factor in the cost of the delivered glass. Due to the nature of their construction, the sheets can not be readily removed therefrom one at a time at their destination whereby the case serves as a storage rack as is often desirable. Instead, the wooden cases must be disassembled and the sheets removed to other storage facilities.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a shipping rack or case comprised of a small number of standardized components which are readily assembled by relatively unskilled labor in the proper configuration to accommodate the desired number of glass sheets of given dimensions. The case protects the sheets against damage in transit, and may serve as a temporary storage rack from which the sheets can be removed individually as needed. When empty the case can be easily dismantled for return shipment to the point of origin in compact form. Since the components are reusable, the problem of waste disposal is avoided and, over an extended period, a substantial saving in cost is realized.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view, with the protective covering partially stripped away, of the shipping case of the invention as loaded with glass sheets;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation showing the case loaded with sheets of relatively small dimensions and illustrating in phantom the manner in which it can accommodate sheets of larger dimensions;

FIG. 3 is a vertical, transverse sectional view taken substantially along line 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view of an upper corner of the assembled case of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a plan view taken substantially along line 5-5 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown generally at 10 a shipping case constructed in accordance with the invention and containing a plurality of glass sheets 11. The shipping case includes a base, shown generally at 12, having a main member 13, to which are secured uprights 14. The uprights are affixed above the sheets 11 to a cap member 15 so that, in a manner to be hereinafter described, the sheets 11 are held within the framework formed by the base 12, uprights l4 and cap member 15.

In the illustrated embodiment the main base member 13, uprights l4 and cap member 15 may be conventional steel channel members affixed together as by top bolts 16 (FIG. 3) with nuts 17 and bottom bolts 18 with nuts 19 to form a rigid frame. Other suitable fasteners may, of course, be employed in place of the nuts and bolts. The horizontal base member 13 and shorter cap member 15 are normally of equal width so as to span the thickness of the plurality of glass sheets 11 when assembled with the uprights l4, and of greater width than the uprights so as to provide rigid support to the load when lifted.

Lifting of the unit may be accomplished by overhead lifting means such as a crane (not shown) together with a chain 20 and hooks 21 which may, for example, be rigidly attached to the cap member 15 or carried by the top bolts 16 as shown. In this manner, the frame may easily be placed on a fork lift truck or other convenient transport means, or lifted and transported within a storage area by an overhead crane.

As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 4, the uprights 14 are provided with a plurality of spaced openings 22 in the webs thereof which allow vertical adjustment of the cap member 15 to accommodate sheets of varying heights. In order to secure the sheets against endwise movement, they are generally placed with one edge adjacent one end of the base member as will be hereinafter explained. Thus, base member 13 is similarly provided with a plurality of aligned openings 23 spaced along the opposite flanges thereof permitting adjustment of the longitudinal position of the uprights 14 to compensate for a shift in the center of gravity occasioned by the loading of sheets of different widths, thereby allowing the cap member 15 to be shifted so that the lifting hooks 21 straddle the center of gravity on all loads. For example, the unit may be constructed to accommodate sheets of glass ranging in height from 50 to inches and from 90 to inches in width. This range will accommodate the great majority of such flat glass sheets shipped in commerce.

The frame of the apparatus can also be adjusted to provide a varying distance between the uprights so that different numbers of sheets may be packed therein for a given shipment. In alignment with each set of spaced openings 23 in the flanges of the base member 13 are slots 24 (FIG. 3) in the web thereof, which slots are sufficient in size to accommodate the uprights 14. As illustrated in FIG. 5, similar slots 25 are provided in the cap member 15. Thus, the sheet receiving cavity may be narrowed by locating either or both of the uprights of each pair within the slots 24 and 25.

Frames suitable for shipping glass sheets have been successfully constructed wherein the base member 13 and the cap member 15 were standard five, 6- or 7-inch steel channels, and the uprights 14 were standard 2-inch channels. Of course, the inventive concept would apply to structural components of any suitable dimensions.

Within the framework described, sheets of glass are cushioned and protected from damage at their edges by a peripheral shell (which may be wood) shown generally at 26 (FIGS. 1 and 2). This shell is comprised of vertical members 27 at either end, a top horizontal member 28 and a plurality of spaced cushioning bottom blocks 29, which may be glued or fastened to the base member as by recessed bolts (not shown). A steel band 30 encircles the shell and protective end pads 31 in the lower region, and urges the sheets against an end retainer block 32 extending into an opening in the web of the main base member 13 behind a bar 33 between the flanges thereof. The banding arrangement thus secures the sheets against endwise movement. The top corners 34 of the shell 26 may be tacked or nailed if such is necessary to hold them in place.

The sheets 11 are secured vertically by adjustable screw jacks 35 threaded in nuts 36 affixed to the cap member 15 and having pads 37 adapted to bear against the top horizontal member 28. Thus, when the cap member 15 is properly positioned along the uprights 14 and secured in place, the screw jacks 35 are turned down so that the pads 36 bear against the member 28 and apply force between the cap member 15 and the member 28.

To further protect the fragile cargo within, the uprights 13 may be lined with a layer 38 of felt or other soft resilient material facing the glass sheets. The glass itself may be covered with an outer protective layer 39 such as corregated fibreboard or heavy paper. In addition, the outer faces of the uprights 14 may be faced with wooden strips (not shown) to protect adjacent containers.

To remove the glass sheets 11 from the shipping case after shipment, the band is removed and the adjustable screw jacks and the frame nuts 17 and 19 are loosened. The peripheral shell 26 and corregated fiberboard or paper covering 39 may then be removed, leaving the glass sheets 11 readily available for easy removal from the end of the case as needed. Alternatively, the case may be placed on a buck so as to lean against a supporting surface, and the uprights 14 adjacent the nuts 17 and 19 completely removed so as to expose the sheets.

From the above description, it can readily be appreciated that, unlike the one-way, custom-built wooden boxes long used to ship flat glass and other fragile materials, the shipping case of the invention is almost totally reusable. The only components contemplated by the invention which are specifically constructed for the particular shipment are the upper sections of wooden shell 26, outer covering layer 39 and the steel band 30. This represents a far smaller repetition of investment in material and labor than with the prior art structures. The permanent frame of the invention readily lends itself to disassembly, and may easily be returned in a knocked-down form for reuse in shipping the same or a different number or size of sheets. This flexibility in size and number of sheets accommodated also represents a distinct advantage.

Although the preferred embodiment relates the invention to the shipment of flat glass sheets, it is readily adaptable for use with other products having like shipping characteristics.

We claim:

1. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material, comprising an elongated longitudinally extending base member upon which said sheets stand in face-to-face upright position, pairs of upright members fastened to said base member at spaced locations therealong, the upright members of each said pair being located on opposite sides of said plurality of sheets and extending upwardly above said sheets to enclose said sheets therebetween, an elongated longitudinally extending cap member fastened between said upright members above said sheets, clamp means carried by said cap member for exerting pressure downwardly against the upper edges of said sheets to immobilize said sheets within said shipping case, and fastening means for said pairs of upright members located at spaced intervals along said base member whereby said spaced pairs of upright members may be located at selected locations therealong to accommodate sheets of different lengths and maintain the balance of the loaded case.

2. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 1, including means spaced along said upright members for fastening said cap member at selected positions to accommodate sheets of different heights in said case.

3. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material, comprising an elongated longitudinally extending base member upon which said sheets stand in face-to-face upright position, pairs of upright members fastened to said base member at spaced locations therealong, the upright members of each said pair being located on opposite sides of said plurality of sheets and extending upwardly above said sheets to enclose said sheets therebetween, an elongated longitudinally extending cap member fastened between said upright members above said sheets, and clamp means carried by said cap member for exerting pressure downwardly against the upper edges of said sheets to immobilize said sheets within said shipping case, the means for fastening said upright members to said base member including openings extending through said base member, corresponding openings at the lower end of said pairs of upright members, and connector means extending through said corresponding openings in said base and upright members, said base having a plurality of said openings spaced along the length thereof whereby said pairs of upright members may be located at selected locations to accommodate sheets of different lengths, the means for fastening said ca member to said upright members including openings exten ing through said cap member, corresponding openings in said pairs of upright members, and connector means extending through said openings in said base and upright members, said upright members having a plurality of said openings spaced therealong whereby said cap member may be fastened at selected locations to accommodate sheets of different heights.

4. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 3, including a pair of spaced hooks associated with said cap member by which said shipping case can be engaged and lifted.

5. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 3, wherein said clamp means includes a screw jack carried by said cap member for turning down to exert said pressure against the upper edges of the sheets when said cap member is fastened in said selected location.

6. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 3, including a retainer block extending upwardly from and restrained against longitudinal movement relative to said base member at one edge of said sheet, and a band encircling said sheets and retainer block and urging said sheets toward said retainer block to prevent endwise movement of said sheets.

7. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 3, including a retainer block extending upwardly from and restrained against longitudinal movement relative to said base member at each edge of said sheets, and a band encircling said sheets and retainer blocks.

8. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 3, wherein said base member and cap member comprise inverted channel-shaped sections, said openings extending through said base and cap members comprising matching holes in the opposite flanges of said channelshaped sections, and including slots in the webs of said base member and cap member spaced inwardly from said flanges and transversely aligned with said holes for receiving said upright members whereby the distance between the upright members of each said pair may be varied to accommodate different numbers of said sheets.

9. A shipping case for sheets of frangible material as claimed in claim 8, including cushioning blocks mounted on top of said web of said base member between said slots, a layer of resilient material on the interior face of said upright members adjacent said sheets, and protective strips extending along the ends and across the top of said sheets.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US495424 *15 Feb 189311 Apr 1893 Method of packing shingles and machine therefor
US2305405 *7 Aug 194015 Dec 1942Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoClamping means for glass racks
US3253852 *15 May 196431 May 1966Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoSheet material handling device
US3443831 *14 Apr 196713 May 1969Grange Howard LDevice for clamping and handling articles
FR1405317A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3976321 *21 Feb 197524 Aug 1976Dean Research CorporationSheet material handling apparatus
US4664254 *3 Jun 198512 May 1987Sitwell Christine LShipping container for works of art
US5518118 *27 May 199421 May 1996Hasenkamp Internationale Transport Gmbh & Co. KgTransporting holding device for picture frames or the like
US5595301 *20 Mar 199621 Jan 1997Hasenkamp Internationale Transport Gmbh & Co. KgTransporting holding device for picture frames or the like
US675227126 Jul 200222 Jun 2004Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Windshield packaging system using synergistic clamp jaw components
US678967426 Jul 200214 Sep 2004Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Windshield packaging system using pressure-regulated clamps
US688669226 Jul 20023 May 2005Alfred E. Mann Institute For Biomedical Engineering At The University Of Southern CaliforniaWindshield packaging system using corrugated box with horizontally-running flutes
US7080735 *14 Apr 200525 Jul 2006Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Windshield packaging system using pressure-regulated clamps with synergistic clamp jaw components
US7108141 *5 Oct 200119 Sep 2006Ani Gonzalez-RiveraFragile article transportation, display and storage system
US7412792 *3 Dec 200519 Aug 2008George HaleMounting and framing system and apparatus
US753377112 Apr 200619 May 2009Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Windshield packaging system using pressure-regulated clamps with synergistic clamp jaw components
US832273322 Jul 20104 Dec 2012Pack-All, LlcDevice and method for storing and transporting substantially planar articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification294/67.1, 206/585, 206/477, 206/451, 206/583, 294/67.41, 206/454
International ClassificationB65G49/05, B65D85/48, B65G49/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65G49/061, B65D85/48
European ClassificationB65G49/06B, B65D85/48
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
27 Oct 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: LOF GLASS, INC., 811 MADISON AVE., TOLEDO, OH 4369
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO CONDITION RECITED.;ASSIGNOR:LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD COMPANY AN OH. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004687/0980
Effective date: 19860320
Owner name: LOF GLASS, INC.,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD COMPANY AN OH. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004687/0980