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Publication numberUS3630522 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date28 Dec 1971
Filing date3 Apr 1970
Priority date3 Apr 1970
Publication numberUS 3630522 A, US 3630522A, US-A-3630522, US3630522 A, US3630522A
InventorsMerwyn S Bear
Original AssigneeMerwyn S Bear
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic tactical game
US 3630522 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Merwyn S. Bear 15 Hodgdon Terrace, West Roxbury, Mass. 02132 [21] Appl. No. 25,310 [22] Filed Apr. 3, 1970 [45] Patented Dec. 28, 1971 [54] ELECTRONIC TACTICAL GAME 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

52 11.5. C1 273/94 R, 273/138 A [51] Int. Cl A63f 7/06 [50] Field of Search 273/88, 93 R, 94 R, 138 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,029,834 2/1936 Prentice 273/94 R 3,046,015 7/1962 Schuh et al. 273/94 R 3,372,933 3/1968 Murzyn 273/88 R 3,439,281 4/1969 McGuire et a1 273/138 A X 3,459,427 8/1969 Rhodes 273/138 A 3,563,547 2/1971 Marsh ABSTRACT: A board formed with a plurality of openings and having indicia of a game illustrated on the upper surface thereof is affixed to a platform which is rotatably mountedto a base. A rotatable computing wheel having a plurality of alphanumeric characters in arcuate rows and radial columns printed on the upper surface thereof is interposed between the board and platform, selected columns of alphanumeric characters being visible through the openings. Indicators in juxtaposition with selected openings oscillate in response to signals as at the output of a random function generator which is controlled by offensive and defensive switch matrices. Completion of a game maneuver, each game maneuver being specified by offensive and defensive switch positions, is evidenced when the indicators cease to oscillate, the outcome of a maneuver being determined by interpolation of selected indicators and visible alphanumeric characters.

PATENTEU BEC28 I9?! SHEET 1 OF 2 FIG. I

FIG. 2

INVENTOR MERWYN S. BEAR.

ATTORNEYS PATENTEB uacza I97! SHEET 2 BF 2 m m mum vmm NNN O m0 .1 ma 0 o N INVENTOR MERWYN S; BEAR FIG. 3

ATTORNEYS ELECTRONIC TACTICAL GAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to electronic games and, more particularly, to electronic games utilizing electronic random function generators.

2. Description of the Prior Art Generally, games as known in the art are of two types, namely mechanical and electromechanical. Mechanical games are played with standard game board techniques for indication of relative game progress, such standard techniques being dice, cards or spinners. Generally, electromechanical games utilize a drum having a plurality of contacts on the outer surface thereof, the position of the contacts with respect to a pickoff arm or brush determining the outcome of each game play. Due to mechanical and electromechanical limitations such games would have to be unduly complex and expensive in order to present a realistic contest.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a realistic electronic game characterized by a game board formed with a plurality of openings and having indicia of a contest on the upper surface thereof, a computing wheel having a plurality of alphanumeric characters in arcuate rows and radial columns, a function generator for providing random signals in response to signals as at the outputs of offensive and defensive switch matrices, and indicators in juxtaposition with selected game board openings and responsive to the random signals as at the output of the function generator. The combination of game board, computing wheel, random function generator, offensive and defensive switch matrices and indicators is such as to provide a simple, inexpensive and realistic electronic game.

The invention accordingly, comprises the electronic game possessing the construction and combination of elements, and arrangements of parts that are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure, the scope of which will be indicated in the appended claims.

BRIEF DISCLOSURE OF THE DRAWINGS For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the present invention reference should be had to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective, partly broken away, of a game embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional taken along the lines of 2-2 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the sporting game of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown a base formed with an annular channel 12 and a bracket 14 having substantially perpendicular legs 16 and 18. Leg 16 is formed with a protuberance 20 which is slidably received within channel 12. A platform 22 and a game board 24 are fastened to leg 18, platform 22 and game board 24 being rotatable with respect to base 10. A housing 26 having a lip 28 is supported by platform 22 which is formed with an opening 30, housing 26 and lip 28 being slightly smaller and larger than opening 30, respectively. A computing wheel 32, substantially disk-shaped and formed with a central aperture 34, is interposed between platform 22 and game board 24 in such a manner that computing wheel 32 is rotatable with respect to game board 24 and platform 22. Generally, game board 24 overlaps computing wheel 32. However, access to computing wheel 32 for rotation thereof is made available at concave depressions 36, 38 as at the outer surface of game board 24. Preferably, base 10 and leg 16 are provided with stops (not shown) so that game board 24 is rotatable only 180 with respect to base 10. It is to be understood that, in alternative embodiments, game board 24 is fixed to base 10. The details of game board 24 and computing wheel 32 are shown in FIG. 1.

Game board 24 is formed with a plurality of radially extending slotted apertures 42, 44, 46, 48 and 50 and a plurality of substantially rectangular apertures 52, 54, 56, 58 and 60. As best shown in the broken away section of FIG. 1, the upper surface of computing wheel 32 is provided with a plurality of alphanumeric characters in arcuate rows and radial columns which are in register with slotted apertures 42, 44, 46, 48 and 50. As computing wheel 32 is rotated, a selected radial column of alphanumeric characters is presented at each of apertures 42, 44, 46, 48 and 50.

Indicating wheels 62, 64; 66; and 68, 70; each having alphanumeric characters in arcuate rows on the upper surface thereof, are rotatably mounted to game board 24 via a plurality of pins 71. A portion of each of indicating wheels 62, 64; 66; and 68, 70 projects through apertures 72, 74; 76; 78, 80; respectively, in game board 24 and the alphanumeric characters on each of indicating wheels 62, 64; 66; and 68, 70 are in register with apertures 52, 54; 56; 58, 60; respectively. As each of the indicating wheels are rotated, selected alphanumeric characters representing home score, quarter and visitors score are presented at apertures 52, 54; 56; 58, 60; respectively.

An offensive station 82 and a defensive station 84 are mounted on game board 24 diametrically opposite each other. A partition 86 mounted on game board 24 about offensive station 82 and a partition 88 mounted on game board 14 about defensive station 84 are provided for visibly shielding the stations from each other. Although in the illustrated preferred embodiment, stations 82 and 84 are mounted on game board 24, it will be readily appreciated that, in an alternative embodiment, each station is a self-contained module physically separate from the tactical game but electrically connected thereto.

In the preferred embodiment, the tactical game is football and includes indicia of a football game, such as a football field 90, a movable 10-yard yard marker 92 and a football 94. The remaining indicia of a football game presented on game board 24 will become meaningful in the discussion of the associated electronic and the operation thereof. It is to be understood that, in alternate embodiments of the present invention, the contest is other than football, for example baseball or a war game.

Referring now to the schematic diagram of FIG. 3 for a discussion of the electronic circuitry associated with the football game. Generally, the electronic circuitry is comprised of a power supply 96, an indicating circuit 98, a random function generator and switching logic 102.

Power supply 96 includes a pair of input terminals 104, 106, a diode 108, a resistor and a capacitor 112. Diode 108 is connected serially between terminal 104 and one side of resistor 110, the cathode of diode 108 being connected to terminal 106 at resistor 1 10. The other side of resistor 110 is connected to terminal 106 at a common junction 114 which is at ground potential. Capacitor 112 is connected in parallel with resistor 110. In one example, 1 15 v. 60 hertz is applied to terminals 104, 106 and is converted to direct current by the half wave rectifier action of diode 108, resistor 110 and capacitor 112 functioning as a voltage regulator and filter. During the positive half cycle of the input voltage when input current is flowing through diode 108, a charge is stored on capacitor 112 and during the negative half cycle when input current is blocked by diode 108, capacitor 112 is discharged. It will be readily appreciated that, in alternative embodiments, power supply is other than a rectifier circuit, for example a battery.

Indicating circuit 98 includes resistors 116, 118, 120, 122 and 124, a diode 126, a capacitor 128, a transistor and neon lamps 132, 134 and 136. One side of each of resistors 116, 118 and the emitter of transistor 130 are connected at the common junction of the cathode of diode 108, resistor 1 10 Win.

and capacitor 112. The other side of resistor 116 is connected to the junction of resistor 122, neon lamp 132, the cathode of diode 126 and capacitor 128; resistor 122 being in parallel with neon lamp 132 and capacitor 128 being in parallel with diode 126. One side of neon lamp 134 is connected to the junction of capacitor 128, the anode of diode 126 and resistor 118. Resistor 124 is connected in parallel with neon lamp 136. The collector of transistor 130 is connected to a junction 138 of resistor 124 and neon lamp 136 through resistor 120.

Random function generator 100 includes neon lamps 140,

142, 144, 146 and 148; capacitors 150, 152, 154, 156 and 158; resistors 160, 162, 164, 166, 168, 170 and 172; diodes 174, 176, 178, 180, 182, 184, 186, 188, 190 and 192; and transistor 194. The base of transistor 194 is connected to the junction of the anode of diode 126, resistor 118 and neon lamp 134 through resistor 162. The emitter of transistor 194 is connected to the cathode of each diode 174, 178, 182, 186 and 190 and the collector of transistor 194 is connected to the anode of each diode 176, 180, 184, 188 and 192. The anode of diode 174 and the cathode of diode 176; the anode of diode 178 and the cathode of diode 180; the anode of diode 182 and the cathode of diode 184; the anode of diode 186 and the cathode of diode 188; and the anode of diode 190 and the cathode of diode 192 are connected at junctions 196, 198, 200, 202 and 204, respectively. Junction 196 is connected to junction 198 through capacitor 150, junction 198 is connected to junction 200 through capacitor 152, junction 200 is connected to junction 202 through capacitor 154, junction 202 is connected to junction 204 through capacitor 156, and junction 204 is connected to junction 196 through capacitor 158. Each of junctions 196, 198, 200, 202 and 204 is connected to ground through resistors 164, 166, 168, 170 and 172, respectively. Resistor 160 is connected serially between the base and emitter of transistor 130. One side of each of neon lamps 142, 144, 146 and 148 is connected to the junction of resistor 160 and emitter of transistor 130. The other side of each of neon lamps 142, 144, 146 and 148 are connected to junctions 198, 200, 202, and 204, respectively. Junction 196 is connected to the base of transistor 130 through neon lamp 140. It is to be understood that, in alternative embodiments, random function generator 100 is other than an oscillator-lamp circuit, for example, a transistorized oscillator circuit.

Switching logic 102 includes diodes 206, 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 and 218 and switches 220, 222, 224, 226, 228, 230, 232 and 234, each of the switches having A and B terminals. The junction of resistor 122 and neon lamp 132 is connected directly to the A terminals of each of switches 222, 224 and 226. The A terminal of switch 220 is connected to the A terminal of switch 222 through diode 208, the cathode of the diode being at switch 220, The B terminals of switches 220, 224 and 226 are connected directly to the A terminals of each of switches 228, 230 and 232, respectively. The B terminal of switch 222 is connected to the A terminal of switch 230 through diode 216, the anode of the diode being at the B terminal. The anode and cathode of diode 218 are connected to the anode of diode 216 and the A terminal of switch 228, respectively. The cathode of diode 212 and the anode of diode 214 are connected to the junction of the anodes of each of diodes 216 and 218. The cathode of diode 214 and the anode of diode 206 are connected to the A terminal of switch 234. The cathodes of diodes 210 and 212 are connected to the A terminal of switch 232 and the anode of 214, respectively, the anodes of diodes 210 and 212 are connected to the free side of neon lamp 134. The A terminal of switch 234 is connected to the junction of resistors 124 and neon lamp 136. The B terminals of each of switches 228, 230, 232 and 234 are connected to ground.

CIRCUIT OPERATION It will be helpful, in understanding the following discussion, to recall the nonlinear characteristics of the neon lamp. There are three such characteristics important to the electronic game circuitry. The first characteristic is that of voltage regulation. For any current less than a saturation current, the operating voltage across the neon lamp is constant. To start the lamp operating, a firing voltage must be impressed across it, this voltage being significantly higher than that required to sustain operation. If the operating voltage is reduced, the eutoff voltage will be reached and the lamp will turn off. It is to be noted that, the difference between the firing and operating voltage is significantly greater than the difference between the operating and cutoff voltage. Typical values of firing, operating and cutoff voltages are 75, 55 and 50 volts, respectively.

The signal as at the input of indicating circuit 98 from power supply 96 may take any one of three paths; the first being through neon lamp 132, the second through neon lamp 134 and the third being through neon lamp 136. In the illustrated embodiment, neon lamps 132, 134 and 136 indicate, when energized, no gain-loss, yardage gained and interceptfumble recovery, respectively. When point 236, the junction of resistor 122, neon lamp 132 and the A terminal of switch 226, is grounded or nearly grounded through switching logic 102, neon lamp 132 is energized. When point 238, the junction of the anodes of diodes 210, 212 and neon lamp 134, is nearly grounded through switching logic 102 and point 236 is not grounded, neon lamp 134 is energized. When point 240, the junction of resistor 124, neon lamp 136, the A terminal of switch 234 and the anode of diode 206, is nearly grounded and transistor 130 is conducting, neon lamp 136 is energized.

When selected switches of logic 102 are closed, providing a path from 236 to ground, additional resistance such as that of a reverse diode may be presented at point 236. For example, if switches 224 and 228 are closed, a path is provided in the reverse direction through diode 216 and in the forward direction through diode 218. At the instant a path is completed from point 236 to ground, current flows through 1 16 and 122. The potential across resistor 122 exceeds the firing voltage of neon lamp 132, whereby neon lamp is energized. On the other hand, if the resistance between point 236 and ground is large with respect to resistors 116 and 122, the voltage across resistor 122 is such that the firing voltage of neon lamp 132 is not achieved, in consequence neon lamp 132 is not energized. The path from point 246 to point 240 is similar to the path to point 236 with the exception that transistor 130 is in series with resistors and 124. It is to be noted that, the path to point 240 functions as an AND circuit since the transistor must be in a state of conductance and point 240 must be grounded if neon lamp 136 is to be energized. The path to point 238 is somewhat different from the other two in that there is no resistance in parallel with neon lamp 134. This is the case since no discrimination is required for this indicator. Except as hereinafter described, point 238 is nearly grounded and neon lamp 134 is energized each time the path to point 238 is completed to ground.

Capacitor 128 and diode 126 form an OR circuit such that either neon lamp 132 or 134, but not both, are energized. When only point 238 is grounded, only neon lamp 134 is energized since a circuit through neon lamp 132 is not complete. Capacitor 128 accumulates a significant charge such that point 242 is at a higher potential than point 244. If point 236 is grounded, the voltage as at point 242 is such that neon lamp fires immediately and then the potential across neon lamp 132 decreases below to the operating voltage. The voltage as at point 244 decreases below the voltage as at point 242 by the amount of the charge stored across capacitor 128, in consequence neon lamp 134 is deenergized. Diode 126 prevents the potential as at point 244 from increasing above the potential as at the point 242, whereby the neon lamp 134 remains deenergized.

Random number generator 100 is an oscillator, generally termed a ring counter, the nonlinear characteristics of the neon lamp being the key to its operation. The basic elements of the oscillator consist of a neon lamp, a resistor and a capacitor as in the configuration of neon lamp 140, resistor 164 and capacitor 150. It is to be understood that, in alternative embodiments, the number of sets in the oscillator is other than five, for example two or seven and the number of oscillators is other than one, for example two or three. When power is applied to the line 246, each of neon lamps 140, 142, 144, 146 and 148 are energized sequentially. lf it is assumed that neon lamp 140 is energized initially, then current flows to ground through resistor 164; capacitor 150 resistor 166; capacitor 158; resistor 172; and capacitor 152, resistor 168; capacitor 156, resistor 170. Since the two paths described are parallel, there is little or no charge stored in capacitor 154 and neon lamps 144 and 146 have the greatest potential difference across their terminals. Circuit imbalance will determine which of neon lamps 144 and 146 is energized first. lf neon lamp 144 has a lower firing voltage then neon lamp 146, then neon lamp 144 will be energized next and the voltage across it will decrease instantly from the firing voltage to the operating voltage. As a result of the charge stored on capacitor 152, 150 and 156, 158, the voltage across neon lamp 140 decreases from the operating potential to less than the cutoff potential, in consequence neon lamp 140 is deenergized. By reasoning similar to that above, capacitors 152, 150 begin to discharge and then charge in the opposite direction. Capacitor 154 charges immediately, thereby increasing the voltage across neon lamp 146 so that it is the next to fire. lt will be readily appreciated that, by similar reasoning, the neon lamps are energized sequentially. Any time,,capacitors 150, 152, 154, 156 and 158 are shorted individually and simultaneously oscillation ceases and the neon lamps that is energized at the time shorting occurs, remains energized. Each of the neon lamps are at the operating potential of the energized lamp and since firing voltage is not achieved, none of the others fire. With the capacitors shorted the circuit is in a monostable mode.

Resistor 160, connected from power source 96 to neon lamp 140 and the base of transistor 130, provides a voltage drop of approximately 1 volt when neon lamp 140 is energized, whereby transistor 130 operates as a switch. When neon lamp 140 is off, the base and emitter voltages of transistor 130 are essentially equal, whereby transistor 130 is cut off. When neon lamp 140 is energized, there is a potential difference between the emitter and base of transistor 130, in consequence transistor 130 conducts in a saturated state.

Transistor 194 operates as a switch which turns the oscillator on and off, the control signal being applied to its base through resistor 162. When neon lamps 132 and 134 are deenergi'zed the voltage as at the base of transistor 194 is sufficiently high with respect to the voltage as at the emitter that transistor 194 is cut off. Conversely, if either neon lamp 132 and 134 is energized, the voltage as at the base of transistor 194 is such that transistor 194 is conducting and random function generator 100 is not oscillating. lf transistor 194 is cutoff, there is no path for capacitor 150, 152, 154, 156, and 158 to discharge, the discharge path for each of the capacitors being across either a reverse biased diode or reversed biased transistor 194. When transistor 194 is in a conducting state, its emitter and collector represent essentially a short circuit, whereby a discharge path is provided for the capacitors.

If switch 234 is closed, point 240 is grounded and current is prevented from flowing back through any other part of the switching logic by diode 214, diode 208 preventing point 240 from being grounded by switches 222, 224 and 226. When switch 220 and switch 228 are closed, point 240 is grounded, diode 218 preventing communication between switch 220 and switches 230 and 234. If any one of switches 228, 230 and 234 is closed, point 238 is grounded; diode 210 preventing communication between switches 226, 232 and switches 228, 230 and 234, and diode 212 preventing communication between switches 222 and 232. Point 236 is grounded when switches 220 and 228 are closed, diode 218 preventing communication between switches 230 and 234 and switch 220. Point 236 is,

grounded also when switch 222 is closed in combination with any one of switches 228, 230 and 234, a path being provided in the forward direction through diodes'218, 216 and 214 respectively. Switches 224 and 230, when closed, define a ground path for point 236, diode 216 preventing communication between switch 224 and switches 228, 234. Also, point 236 is grounded when switches 226 and 232 are closed, com- GAME PLAY The offensive player (ball carrier) decides on and executes a passing, rushing or kicking play and the defensive player attempts to block, tackle, intercept or cause a fumble, each utilizing their respective switches. The offense and defense switches form a logic network which may be fixed or random, the particular choice being such as to provide realism to the game play. In one example of game operation, the fixed logic for no gain is comprised of the combinations of long pass with block, fumble and intercept; short pass with fumble; and rush with tackle. The random logic is comprised of the kick and block switches combining to provide no gain about 20 percent of the time and the intercept switch causing an interception about 20 percent of the time regardless of play outcome. The result of each play in terms of yardage gained, not gained or lost is determined by interpolation of energized neon lamps and visible alphanumeric characters of computing wheel 32. The order of play, including kickoffs, downs, quarters, scoring and the like, follow the rules of professional or college football.

Play is initiated using the offensive and defensive switch box modules 82-and 84 respectively, each switch representing a specific game maneuver. The offensive player may choose a long pass, short pass, rush or kick and the defensive player may counter with a block, fumble, tackle or intercept. The amount of yardage gained is shown by the computing wheel 32, five neon lamps being used in combination with a down arrow and the computing wheel. The neon lamps continually oscillate or blink until a play is completed, at which time one, two or none of them will remain lit. The yardage gained is shown in the column marked by the lamp that remains on, and the row marked by the offensive play. If none of the lamps are on, any desired column may be used. If two of the lamps are on, the sum of the appropriate figures from both columns is used. The figures at the outer periphery of computing wheel 32 is in the column marked DOWN are used to mark the down. One of the first downs is shaded such that its appearance marks the end of one quarter and the beginning of the next.

As previously indicated, the rules and objectives of football are closely followed in the electronic game. The timing is accomplished by a play count rather than a timer. Downs, quarters and scoring, however, are accomplished in a manner similar to football. After each play the computing wheel is rotated to the next higher down at the down arrow, or the next first down, whichever is appropriate. When the shaded first down makes a complete revolution and appears again at the down arrow, the quarter is over and the teams switch goal posts. At the beginning of the second half or third quarter, the team that did not kick off at the beginning of the game, does so.

Play begins with the kickoff from the kicking team s 40-yard line, the kicking team closing the kick switch and the opposing team closing the block switch. If both the no yardage and intercept lamps are energized, the kick was not a good one, the ball is moved back 5 yards and kickoff is attempted again. If further bad kicks are encountered, the ball is moved back 5 yards each bad kick. If both lamps do not light, the kick was a good one and the amount of yardage is determined in the manner described previously. The marker is moved on the field from the kickofi line toward the receiver except in the event of a negative number. it is thus possible to score a touchdown from the kickoff if the negative number is large enough to cause the ball marker to move over the goal line. For the kickoff and the subsequent first down, the shaded first down on computing wheel 32 is in line with the down arrow.

The kick receiver then assumes the offense and starts the first down by closing the switch representing the play he wishes to make, i.e., either short pass, long pass, rush or kick. The defensive player completes the down by closing the switch representing the play he wishes to make, i.e., either block, fumble, tackle or intercept. if the no yards indicator lights, there will be no advance of the ball marker. If this indicator does not light the ball marker is moved by the number of yards represented by the visible alphanumeric characters of computing wheel 32. The yardage appears in the column marked by the on indicator light. The row will be that representing the offensive play executed. Ifthe intercept, fumble recovery indicator light is on, the defensive team recovers the ball on the line of scrimmage if there is no gain, or at the new ball marker position if yards are gained. If, however, a touchdown would have been scored, the ball is moved to the l-yard line only, where the defense recovers. After the play is complete, computing wheel 32 is rotated to the next down or the next first down, whichever is appropriate.

One of the neon lamps, in addition to its indicating function, represents an offensive penalty, and another neon lamp represents a defensive penalty. When one of these lamps is on in combination with a number appearing in the penalty row of that column, a flag is considered down on the play and penalty yardage is assessed. Consistent with the rules of football, penalties may be declined. If the penalty is not declined, no yards are gained, the penalty is assessed and the down is repeated. A third neon lamp represents a loss. When this lamp lights in combination with the no gain or loss indicator the ball marker is moved back from the line of scrimmage by the amount of yardage that would have been gained had there been a gain.

if a field goal is to be attempted, the offense must so state prior to the play, thereby preventing an illegal change to a punt in the event the field goal is unsuccessful. To initiate a field goal play, the offense closes the kick switch and the defense closes the block switch. Again, only the combination of the no yards and intercept indicators both on will block the attempt. If the kick is not blocked, the amount of yardage indicated by the yardage computer in the field goal row must be greater than or equal to the number of yards to the goal. Otherwise, the ball marker moves the indicated yardage and is recovered there by the defense. In the event the ball lands within 6 yards of the goal line, the kick is considered inaccurate and the ball is placed on the -yard line.

The punt or kick is a fourth and sometimes third down play used to move the ball as far downfield as possible where it is recovered and run back by the defense. The play works in exactly the same manner as the field goal except that no prestatement ofintention is necessary.

Since certain changes may be made in the foregoing disclosure without departing from the scope of the invention herein involved, it is intended that all matter contained in the above described and shown in the accompanying drawings be construed in an illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. An electronic game, which comprises a. a board mounted to a base, said board having indicia illustrative ofa game on the upper surface thereof;

b. computing means mounted to said board, said computing means having a plurality of alphanumeric characters, some of said alphanumeric characters being visible;

c. a power supply affixed to said board for providing voltage;

d. indicating means electrically communicating with said power supply for presenting a plurality of perceptible signals;

e. switching logic means electrically connected to said indicating means for controlling said perceptible signals presented; and

f. electronic random function generator means having an indicating portion adjacent selected areas of said visible alphanumeric characters electrically communicating with said indicating means and switch logic means, said random function generator means being responsive to signals from said switch logic means to indicate selected ones of said alphanumeric characters.

g. the outcome ofa game maneuver being determined by interpolation of said indicating means and indicated alphanumeric characters.

2. The electronic game as claimed in claim I wherein said indicating means comprises:

a. a first indicator resistively connected to a first output of said switching logic means;

b. a second indicator resistively connected to a second output of said switching logic means;

c. a third indicator resistively connected to a third output of said switching logic means; and

d. a semiconductor switch electrically connected to said random function generator and third indicator for controlling the state of said third indicator.

3. The electronic game as claimed in claim 2 wherein said semiconductor switch is a transistor having its collector terminal resistively communicating with said third indicator, its emitter connected to said power supply and its base electrically communicating with said electronic random function generator.

4. The electronic game as claimed in claim 2 wherein said first, second, and third indicators are neon lamps.

5. The electronic game as claimed in claim 1 wherein said electronic random function generator comprises:

a. a transistor having its base electrically communicating with said indicating means; and of each b. at least two diode pairs, the first diode of each of said pairs having its cathode connected to the emitter of said transistor, the second diode of each of said pairs having its anode connected to the collector of said transistor the anode of said first diode of each pair being connected to the cathode of said second diode of each pair at ajunction, the junction of adjacent diode pairs being resistively connected to ground and operatively connected to said input;

c. capacitor means connected between said junction of adjacent diode pairs; and

d. said indicating portion being neon lamps connected to one of each of saidjunctions.

6. A game comprising:

a. a base;

b. a platform rotatably mounted to said base;

c. a board having indicia of a game on the upper surface thereof affixed to said platform, said game board formed with a plurality of apertures;

d. a computing wheel interposed between said platform and board, said computing wheel being rotatable with respect to said board, said computing wheel having a plurality of alphanumeric characters in arcuate rows and radial columns, some of said columns being visible through the aperture in said board;

e. a power supply affixed to said platform for providing a voltage;

f. indicating means electrically communicating with said power supply for presenting a plurality of perceptible signals;

g. switching logic means electrically connected to said indicating means for controlling said perceptible signals presented; and

h. electronic random function generator means having at least two neon lamps electrically communicating with said indicating means and switching logic means, said neon lamps oscillating in response to signals from said switching logic means;

i. the outcome of a game maneuver being determined by interpolation of energized neon lamps and visible alphanumeric characters, said neon lamps being in juxtaposition with selected openings in said game board.

7. The electronic game as claimed in claim 6 wherein said indicating means comprises:

a. a first indicator resistively connected to a first output of said switching logic means;

b. a second indicator resistively connected to a second output of said switching logic means;

c. a third indicator resistively connected to a third output of said switching logic means; and

d. a transistor switch having its collector terminal resistively communicating with said third indicator, its emitter connected to said power supply and its base electrically communicating with said electronic random function genera- 10!.

8. The electronic game as claimed in claim 6 wherein said electronic random function generator comprises:

lit]

a. a transistor having its base electrically communicating with said indicating means;

b. at least two diode pairs, the first diode of each of said pairs having its cathode connected to the emitter of said transistor, the second diode of each of said pairs having its anode connected to the collector of said transistor, the anode of said first diode of each pair beingconnected to the second diode of each pair at a junction, the junction of adjacent diode pairs being resistively connected to ground and operatively connected to said input; and

c. capacitor means connected between said junction of adjacent diode pairs;

d. one of each of said neon lamps being connected to one of each of said junctions.

9. The game as claimed in claim 6 wherein said sporting contest is a football game.

l0. The game as claimed in claim 9 wherein said switching logic means includes:

a. an offensive switch matrix; and

b. a defensive switch matrix logically communicating with said offensive switch matrix.

* i i i t

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3979117 *14 May 19737 Sep 1976Worsham Ronald EFootball dart board game
US4141548 *16 Jan 197827 Feb 1979Everton Irving MGame apparatus for use in conjunction with the viewing of a spectator's sport
US4249734 *26 Feb 197910 Feb 1981Coleco Industries, Inc.Hand-held two-player electronic football game
US4249735 *28 Jun 197810 Feb 1981Eric BromleyElectronic simulated football game and method
US4249744 *26 Feb 197910 Feb 1981Coleco Industries, Inc.Two-player electronic sports action game
US4327915 *12 Jun 19804 May 1982Coleco Industries, Inc.Display panel for an electronic game and method of employing same
US5071128 *27 Aug 199010 Dec 1991Anderson Roland WSimulated football game apparatus
US20130069307 *19 Sep 201221 Mar 2013Bruce WardEducational Game Board
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/22, 463/4, 273/237
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00643, A63F3/00031, A63F3/00028
European ClassificationA63F3/00E, A63F3/00A4B, A63F3/00A4