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Publication numberUS3579839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date25 May 1971
Filing date5 Nov 1968
Priority date5 Nov 1968
Publication numberUS 3579839 A, US 3579839A, US-A-3579839, US3579839 A, US3579839A
InventorsKowalski Robert J
Original AssigneeKowalski Robert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Archery bow sight
US 3579839 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Robert J. Kowalski 512 Berner St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15215 773,525

Nov. 5, 1968 May 25, 1971 Appl. No. Filed Patented ARCHERY BOW SIGHT 4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 33/46 Int. Cl F4lg 1/00, F41b 5/00 33/464 Field of Search References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,297,575 9/1942 McLean 33/52 2,893,124 7/1959 Sundquest 33/46 3,310,875 3/1967 Kawalski 33/46 Primary Examiner-- Leonard Forman Assistant ExaminerSteven L. Stephan Attorney-Murray, Flick and Peckham ABSTRACT: Described is an archery bow sight in which a sighting element is held in position on a bracket at a location for an approximate range, and incorporating vemier adjustment means on the bracket whereby fine adjustments in range can be made after the sighting element is positioned at its approximate range position on the bracket.

ARCHERY BOW SIGHT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION As is known, a professional archer employs a good quality bow and trains himself to shoot the bow by the application of a rigid pattern of events such that extreme accuracy may be accomplished. The professional archer will always nock an arrow at the same point on the bowstring, and draw the string back such that a particular portion of the hand contacts a particular portion of the head. For example, some archers draw the string back so that the tip of the index finger touches the comer of the mouth. In this manner, the feathered end of the arrow is always at substantially the same distance from the eye and there only remains the action of elevating or lowering the lead of the arrow to correspond to the range at which the target is placed. Some archers aim the bow by intuition, while professional archers employ bow sights of various types.

Bow sights are employed to facilitate the sighting or aiming of tee bow at different ranges. In all such bow sights, the archer aligns the target with a sighting element which extends from the bow into his line of sight. Depending upon the height of the sighting element above the archers hand, he will have to raise or lower the point of the arrow in order to align the sighting element with the target. If the sighting element is close to the archer's hand, he will have to elevate the arrow point and increase range in order to align the target with the sighting element. On the other hand, as the sighting element is progressively raised above the archer's hand, he will have to lower the arrow point and shorten range in order to align the target and sighting element. In the past, various types of bow sights have been provided. In one type, normally used for target practice and tournaments, a single sighting element is slideable along the track or bracket extending substantially parallel to the string of the bow. Normally, the track has indicated thereon various positions which correspond to the different ranges through which the arrow is to be shot. Another type, such as that shown in my US. Pat. No. 3,310,875. employs a plurality of sighting elements each of which is spaced above the arrow receiving portion of the bow by a different distance. In this arrangement, each sighting element corresponds to a particular range or distance from the bow at which the released arrow will hit the target, the highest sighting element corresponding to the shortest range while the lowest sighting element corresponds to the longest range. This latter type of bow sight is particularly useful for the hunter who, when sighting a target such as a deer, normally does not have the time to slide a sighting element to the position corresponding to the range of the target. In my aforesaid US. Pat. No. 3,310,875, I have disclosed a multiple sighting element bow sight wherein each of the sighting elements is normally disposed in a position out of the line of sight of the archer but is movable to a sighting position wherein it extends transversely of the body of the bow and into the line of sight of an archer aiming an arrow. In this manner, the disadvantages of a plurality of sighting elements in the field of view of the archer are eliminated.

One difficulty encountered with prior art bow sights is that the sighting elements are normally positioned on the track or bracket by means of fastening devices such as screws. Accordingly, in order to vary the position of a sighting element, it is necessary to unfasten it from the track or bracket, move it to a new position, and a gain fasten it to the bracket. It has been found in actual practice that frequent, fine adjustments of the sighting elements are required. For example, a sighting element may be positioned on the bracket for a target range of 50 feet; and this may be accurate for the wind conditions and other circumstances prevailing at the time the sighting element was fixed in position. However, under other wind conditions, prevailing perhaps on a succeeding day, the setting of the sighting element will not be exactly correct for a range of 50 feet. Hence, the archer must manually unfasten the sighting element, move it slightly to compensate for the changed conditions, and again fasten it to the bracket. This is a somewhat cumbersome and time-consuming operation, but is necessary unless the archer intends to use the bow sight to approximate range only.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION As an overall object, the present invention provides a new and improved archery bow sight in which a sighting element or elements may first be moved into a position on a bracket for an approximate range and thereafter moved into an exact range position by means of a vemier adjustment.

More specifically, an object of the invention is to provide a bow sight of the type described above wherein one or more sighting elements are mounted on a bracket switch, in turn, is threadedly received on a shaft which can be rotated to move the bracket and one or more sighting elements carried thereon upwardly or downwardly in a vernier adjustment.

A further object of the invention is to provide a screw-type vemier adjustment for an archery bow sight wherein the screw is rotated by means of a knob provided with a spring-loaded ball and detent arrangement such that the knob and screw may be fixed in any one of a plurality of angular positions.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a bow sight having a plurality of sighting elements all provided with a vemier adjustment and capable of being movable into or out of the archer's line of sight for aiming the bow.

In accordance with the invention, a bow sight is provided comprising an elongated member adapted to be secured to the body of a bow above the arrow receiving area thereof and having upper and lower generally parallel flange portions. Extending between the flange portions is a screw device rotatable in bearings provided in the respective flange portions. At least one sighting element carrier is threadedly received on the screw means, while means are provided for preventing rotation of the carrier as the screw means is rotated whereby the carrier will be moved upwardly or downwardly as the screw means is rotated. In this manner, a fine vemier adjustment of a sighting element carried on the carrier can be effected.

Preferably, the elongated screw is provided at one end with a knob having a spring-loaded ball adapted to fit into detents spaced around the screw such that the screw may be rotated by the know and held in a selected position by the ball and detent arrangement, thereby preventing inadvertent movement of the carrier and sighting element.

Further, in accordance with the invention, the individual carriers for the sighting elements are held in position by means of pennanent magnets. In one embodiment of the invention shown herein, a plurality of carriers and sighting elements is provided, each of the carriers comprising an L-shaped arm threadedly received on the screw and pivotal about the axis of the screw. Permanent magnet means are provided for maintaining each of the carriers and their associated sighting elements in either a first position out of line of sight of the archer or in a second position wherein the sighting element is in the line of the sight of the archer. In this manner, a plurality of vertically spaced sighting elements may be provided which are normally maintained out of the line of sight of the archer. However, any selected one of the carriers and its associated. sighting element may be rotated about the screw into a position where it is in the line of sight of the archer and held in its second position by the aforesaid magnet means.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which fonn a part of this specification, and in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the conventional bow provided with the bow sight of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of the bow sight of the present invention showing the manner in which it is secured to the bow; 1

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the bow sight shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line IV-IV of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line V-V of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 illustrates a detachable reticle for a sighting element which can be utilized in accordance with the invention; and

FIG. 7 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention wherein a single sighting element is utilized.

With reference now to the drawings, and in particular to FIG. I, there is illustrated a conventional bow 10 comprising a central body portion 12, a gripping portion 14 beneath the central body portion 12, and a pair of oppositely extending bendable arms 16A and 16B. In the lower region of the central body 12 there is provided an arrow-receiving portion 18 for receiving an arrow 20. Extending between the bendable arms 16A and 16B is a string 22 which, when pulled away from the central body portion 12, serves to bend the bendable arms 16A and 168 to provide the force for propelling the arrow 20. Secured to the side of the central body portion 12 by means of bracket 24 is the bow sight 26 of the present invention.

The bow sight 26 is shown in detail in FIGS. 2 and 3 and includes a plate or arm 28 which fits into the bracket 24 secured to one side of the central body portion 12. Suitable fastening means such as a screw, not shown, may be provided to hold the plate 28 within the bracket 24 and to provide for adjustment of the am and sight inwardly or outwardly for a particular bowstring position. Secured to the plate 28, as best shown in FIG. 3, is a first elongated member 30. The elongated member 30 has a slot 32 therein which receives a fastening nut and bolt 34. In this manner, the entire bow sight 26 may be adjusted upwardly or downwardly to suit the requirements of a particular bow.

Secured to the top of the elongated member 30 is a first flange member 36. Similarly, a second flange member 38 is carried at the bottom of the elongated member 30. Also extending between the flange members 36 and 38 is a magnet assembly 40. As best shown in FIG. 5, the magnet assembly 40 comprises a permanent magnet 42in the form of a strip and having north and south poles extending along its opposite edges. The magnet 42 is sandwiched between metallic strips 44 and 46; and the entire magnet assembly 40 is secured to the flange members 36 and 38 by means of screws 48.

Also extending between the flange members 36 and 38 is an elongated screw 48 rotatable in bearings provided in bores extending through the flange members 36 and 38 as perhaps best shown in FIG. 4. Threaded to the top of the screw 48, as best shown in FIG. 4, is a knurled knob 50 having a bore 52 therein which receives a spring-loaded ball bearing assembly 54. The spring-loaded bearing assembly is adapted to cooperate with detents 56 provided in the upper surface of the flange member 36, the arrangement being such that the screw 48 may be rotated by exerting a slight torque on the knob 50; however, at the same time, the knob 50 and screw 48 are held against inadvertent rotation when the spring-loaded ball bearing assembly 54 is in one of the detents 56. As will be understood, any desired number of detents 56 may be provided around the axis of the screw 48, the greater the number of detents, the more accurate and precise is the angular positioning of the screw Carried on the screw 48 is a plurality of sighting element carriers 58 each comprising an L-shaped arm 60 which carries, at one end thereof, a plate 62. At the other end of each L- shaped am 60 is a threaded bore which receives a threaded sighting element 64. Each sighting element comprises a threaded portion, tapered portion 66 and a ball sight 68 on the end of the tapered portion 66. The sighting element is held in a locked position by means of a lock nut 70; however the lock nut may be loosened and the sighting element moved axially toward and away from the carrier 58 by rotating it, thereby providing a means for compensating for windage.

In the bow sight of FIGS. 2 and 3, for example, each of the sighting element carriers 58 is positionable in a sighting position, indicated by the lower carrier of FIG. 2, and in an out position, indicated by the upper carrier of FIG. 2. While in the out position as shown by the upper sighting element of FIG. 2,

the bar 62 on the L-shaped arm 60 engages the rear edge of the magnet assembly and is held securely thereby. However, by a slight torque on the forward end of the arm 60, the sighting element may be rotated into the position shown by the lower element of FIG. 2 where the forward end of the arm 60 engages the other side of the magnet assembly 40 to hold it securely in engagement therewith. In the use of the invention, each of the sighting element carriers 58 will be positioned along the screw 48 to correspond to a specific range. This range can be marked on a strip 72 (FIG. 5) slipped within a carrier 74 secured to the plate 44, for example.

In the practice of the invention, the plate 28 will be initially slipped through the clamp 24 and the plate and bow sight secured to the bow by means of a fastening screw or the like. Thereafter, the archer can test the sight to determine whether the entire bow sight is correctly positioned for the ranges indicated on the strip 72. If the archer should find, for example, that his arrow falls short of 80 feet when aiming with the sighting element intended for a range of 80 feet, he can then loosen the nut 34 and lower the entire sight until the actual range of the arrow is approximately equal to indicated range of the sighting element which he is using. Thereafter, to effect fine adjustments in range, the screw 48 can be rotated by the knob 50, thereby moving all of the sighting element carriers 58 upwardly or downwardly'along the screw. If changes in wind direction or other conditions should occur such that the actual range of the arrow does not correspond to that indicated by the sighting element, further adjustments can be made by simply turning the screw 48, the spring-loaded ball 54 serving to maintain the screw at any rotational position to which it is turned. Thus, the screw 48 provides a vemier adjustment for all of the sighting elements of the bow sight.

In FIG. 6, a plastic reticle 76 is shown having an opening 78 adapted to receive the ball sight 68 of an associated sighting element 64. In this manner, the reticle 76 can be snapped onto the ball sight or removed and the ball sight 68 itself employed.

, As will be understood, however, when the reticle 76 is employed, it will be necessary to lower the entire bow sight as sembly 26 in order to compensate for the increased height of the center line of the reticle.

With reference now to FIG. 7, another embodiment of the invention is shown wherein a bow sight 80 is secured to the backside of the central portion 12 of the bow rather than to the side as in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5. The bow sight 80 includes a generally U-shaped bracket 82 secured to the back of the central portion 12 and having outwardly projecting flange portions 84 and 86. Extending between the flange portions is a screw 88, similar to the screw 48 in FIG. 2, for example. Secured to the upper end of the screw 88, as in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5, is a knurled knob provided on its underside with a spring-loaded ball and detent arrangement similar to that of the previous embodiment whereby the screw may be easily rotated, but at the same time held at a particular angular position against inadvertent displacement.

Threadedly received on the screw 88 is a second U-shaped member 92 having threaded openings 94 in flanges 96 through which the screw 88 passes. The U-shaped member 92 is magnetized to have north and south poles at its opposite edges. Slideable on the main shank portion of the U-shaped member 92 is a U-shaped member 98 which is held on the member 92 by means of the magnetic lines of flux generated by the permanently magnetized member 92. The member 98, which comprises a sighting element carrier may, however, slide upwardly or downwardly on the main shank portion of the U- shaped member 92 for various ranges which are marked thereon as shown. Carried on the sighting element carrier 98 is a sighting element 100 having a ball sight 102 at its outer extremity.

With the device of FIG. 7, the member 98 is first moved to the mark on member 92 for an approximate range position. Thereafter, the archer may aim at a target having a range of eight feet, for example; and if the arrow falls short of the target, the screw 88 is rotated to lower the U-shaped member 92 and the sighting element 100 carried thereby. On the other hand, if the arrow should overshoot the target, the entire assembly of member 92, member 98 and the sighting element 100 carried thereby are elevated by rotation of the screw 88.

It can be seen, therefore, that the present invention provides a vemier adjustment for bow sights which enables a very fine range adjustment regardless of wind conditions or other circumstances. Although the invention has been shown in connection with certain specific embodiments, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in fonn and arrangement of parts may be made to suit requirements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

lclaim:

1. In combination with an archery bow having an arrow receiving area thereon, an archery bow sight comprising an elongated member adapted to be secured to the body of said bow above said arrow receiving area thereof and having upper and lower generally parallel flange portions, a screw device extending between the flange portions and rotatable about an axis extending generally parallel to said elongated member, a plurality of sighting element carriers threadedly received on the screw device, each of said carriers having a sighting element secured thereto such that movement of a carrier up or down on said screw device will'carry its associated sighting element therewith, means for rotating said screw device and for preventing rotation of saidearriers as the screw device is rotated whereby all of said sighting element carriers and the sighting elements carried thereby will be simultaneously moved upwardly or downwardly along the elongated member as the screw device is rotated, each sighting element being rotatable from a position where it is out of the line of sight of the archer using the bow to a position where it is in the line of sight of the archer, means for releasably holding each of said sighting elements in its position out of the line of sight of the archer, and means for releasably holding each of said sighting elements in its position where it is in the line of sight of the archer.

2. the bow sight of claim 1 wherein said means for holding said sighting elements in positions in and out of the line of sight of the archer comprises permanent magnet means for maintaining all of said sighting element carriers in either of said positions.

3. The bow sight of claim 2 wherein said permanent magnet means comprises a single permanent magnet, one pole of which engages a sighting element to hold it in one position and the other pole ofwhich engages a sighting element to hold it in the other position.

4. The bow sight of claim 1 wherein said screw device is provided at one end with a know having a spring-loaded ball adapted to fit into detents spaced around the screw in one of said parallel flange portions such that the screw may be rotated by the knob and held in a selected position by the ball and detent arrangement.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2297575 *10 Oct 194129 Sep 1942Mclean George HShotgun sight
US2893124 *20 Mar 19577 Jul 1959Reliance Tool & Die WorksArchery bowsight
US3310875 *15 Jul 196428 Mar 1967Robert J KowalskiArchery bow sight
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3822479 *12 Sep 19729 Jul 1974Kowalski RArchery bow sight
US4020560 *7 Apr 19753 May 1977Albert HeckBow sights and methods of making and using the same
US4481717 *27 Jan 198313 Nov 1984Kowalski Robert JArchery bow sight
US4625421 *6 Nov 19852 Dec 1986Strauss Juergen MArchery bow sighting device
US5072716 *30 Jul 199017 Dec 1991Toxoric, Inc.Archery bow sighting device
US5174269 *3 Feb 199229 Dec 1992Toxonic, Inc.Archery bow sighting device
US5379746 *16 Jul 199310 Jan 1995Toxorics Manufacturing, Inc.Device for mounting a sight on an archery bow
US5406712 *26 Apr 199418 Apr 1995Toxonics Manufacturing, Inc.Bow hunting sight
US5442861 *23 Dec 199322 Aug 1995Lorocco; Paul M.Sight pin and holder for archery bow
US5509401 *3 Mar 199423 Apr 1996Trubic; Donald R.Rotary bow sight
US5657740 *12 Feb 199619 Aug 1997Toxonics Manufacturing, Inc.Archery bow pin sight and mount
US5836100 *10 Jul 199617 Nov 1998Williams Gun Sight Co.Fiber optic sight
US5862603 *11 Jul 199726 Jan 1999Ellig; MichaelSighting indicia
US66880081 Aug 200210 Feb 2004Jeffrey J. WuthrichBow sight adjustment mechanism
US673272725 Aug 200011 May 2004Bear Archery, LlcArchery bow with bow speed specific sight pin block
US6802129 *6 Sep 200212 Oct 2004Wirth Reinhold FArchery sight, an optic assembly, and optic adjustment mechanisms for use in an archery sight
US68429899 Sep 200318 Jan 2005Jeffrey J. WuthrichBow sight adjustment mechanism
US7006538 *18 Jan 200028 Feb 2006Komatsu Ltd.Apparatus for locking bending mechanism that bends reflex type wavelength selection element
US7124512 *14 Jan 200524 Oct 2006Richard ForrestArchery bow sight
US732851524 Mar 200612 Feb 2008H-T Archery Products LlcArchery bow sights and archery bows including same
US9103631 *22 Mar 201311 Aug 2015Trophy Taker, Inc.Sight for an archery bow
US93351188 Jan 201510 May 2016Jason Stewart JacksonFiber optic weapon sight
US95879109 May 20167 Mar 2017Jason Stewart JacksonFiber optic weapon sight
US20030072347 *18 Jan 200017 Apr 2003Satoru BushidaApparatus for locking bending mechanism that bends reflex type wavelength selection element
US20060156559 *14 Jan 200520 Jul 2006Richard ForrestArchery bow sight
US20070220761 *24 Mar 200627 Sep 2007H-T Archery Products, LlcArchery bow sights and archery bows including same
US20130247399 *22 Mar 201326 Sep 2013Daniel L. EvansSight for an Archery Bow
WO1995017639A1 *9 Dec 199429 Jun 1995Lorocco Paul MSight pin and holder for archery bow
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/265
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G1/467
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/467
European ClassificationF41G1/467