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Publication numberUS3547405 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date15 Dec 1970
Filing date20 Feb 1969
Priority date20 Feb 1969
Publication numberUS 3547405 A, US 3547405A, US-A-3547405, US3547405 A, US3547405A
InventorsEwald Ronald F
Original AssigneeEwald Ronald F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tilt valve
US 3547405 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O United States Patent 1111' 3,547,

[72] invent r Ronald F-Ewald 3,098,589 7/1963 Graham 251/353X 2700 cardinalbrlveRolling Meadow/8,111- 3,145,011 8/1964 Kappel 251/353x 60008 3,231,153 1/1966 Green et a1. 251/353X [21] Appl- N 801,132 3,344,961 10/1967 Graham 222/402.22

Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 651,622, July 6, 1967, Pat No 3,506,241. 832,507 4/1960 Great Britain ZZZ/402.24 P81611164 Dec-15,1970 Primary Examiner-Samuel Scott [54] TlLT VALVE Attorney-Stefan M. Stein ABSTRACT: An aerosol valve of the tilt action type, having a valve body, a valve stem, a valve stem sealer, a sealing gasket and valve stem biasing means. The valve stem sealer is reciprocally disposed within the cavity of the valve body and has a valve stem cavity in its top wall which is adapted to receive a specially shaped plug on the inner end of the completely separate valve stem. A swirl chamber may be formed on the top surface of the sealer below the stem. The peripheral rim of the valve stem sealer is forcibly urged against the sealing gasket, by the valve stem biasing means, to form a seal. The valve stem is operated by tilting and/or depressing it to break this seal to permit the product to be dispensed.

PATENTEU 05m 5 mm SHEET 2 OF 3 IN VENTOR. RONALD F EWALD mm m ATTYS.

TILT VALVE This is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Ser. No. 651,622, filed July 6, 1967, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,506,241.

This invention relates to valves and, in particular, to aerosol valves of the tilt action type.

Currently, aerosol valves are of two general types: the vertical reciprocating type and the tilt action type. Both are widely used to dispense a variety of products from pressurized containers or cans. v

Tilt action valves generally involvea mechanism wherein the protruding valve stem, in its entirety, is tilted to a nonaxial position. Typical patents which illustrate the operating mechanism of such tilt action valves are: U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,506,449; 2,704,172; 2,912,144; 3,155,290; and 3,219,069. As can be seen in these patents, with complete tilting of the valve stem including that portion contained within the valve body, such action occasionally leads to jamming and leakage between the body and the sealing gasket. This is obviously undesirable. 7

Recently, more sophisticated aerosol valves have been demanded. Fillers demand valves which are tailored to dispense particular products so that the most effective results can be obtained for saidproducts. Thus, aerosol valves have been designed to meter out a specific quantity of product, to mechanically break up the product into a fine spray, to foam the product before it is dispensed and similar effects.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved aerosol valve of the tilt action type.

Another object is to provide a valve of the above character having a cam action valve stem whereby jamming is avoided.

Still another object is to provide a valve of the above character having in combination a swirl chamber.

A further object is to provide a valve of the above character which can be easily and inexpensively manufactured without the need of special equipment and intricate molds.

A still further object is to provide a valve of the above character which can dispense a product intermittently or continuously until empty or until the valve is shut off.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafler.

The aerosol valve of the present invention includes, generally, a valve body adapted to be affixed within the valve turret of a valve housing, a valve stem, a valve stem sealer, a sealing gasket and valve stem biasing means. The valve stem sealer is reciprocally disposed within the cavity of the valve body and has a valve stem cavity in its top wall which is adapted to receive a specially shaped plug on the inner end of the completely separate valve stem. The valve stem biasing means forcibly urges the peripheral rim of the valve stem sealer against the sealing gasket to form a seal.

The valve stem, the valve stem sealer-and the cavity within the valve body have a configuration such thata combination swirl-expansion chamber effect is provided for a more satisfactory dispersion of the product.

In one embodiment, a swirl chamber is fonned between the base of the stem and the sealer.

In operation, the valve stem is tilted, and in some cases depressed, whereby the valve seat on the inner end of the stem cams against the valve stem sealer and causes it to move downwardly into the cavity of the valve body. This action breaks the seal between the rim of the sealer and the sealing gasket, thereby permitting the product to be forced out the valve stem through the action of the propellant within the can.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combination of elements, and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the constructions hereinafter set forth, and the scope will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of ,the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of an aerosol valve, constructed in accordance with a first embodiment of the invention, illustrating its construction and the manner in which it is assembled;

FIG. 2 is a similar sectional view of the valve of FIG. 1, illustrating the manner in which it operates when the valve stem is tilted;

FIG. 3 also is a sectional view of the valve of FIG. I, illustrating the manner in which it operates when the valve stem is depressed;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of an aerosol valve constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a similar sectional view of the valve of FIG. 4, illustrating the manner in which it is operated when the valve stem is tilted; 1

FIG. 6 also is a sectional view of the valve of FIG. 4, illustrating the manner in which it is releasibly locked in an operative position;

FIG. '7 is a sectional view of an aerosol valve constructed in accordance with still another embodiment of the invention, illustrating it in an inoperative position; FIG. 8 is a sectional view of a valve like that of FIG. 7 which has been slightly modified, and further illustrating it in an operative position;

FIG. 9 is a partial sectional view of an aerosol valve, illustrating still another construction for the valve stem sealer;

FIG. 10 is a partial sectional view of an aerosol valve, illustrating the manner in which a valve stem having a closed inner end can be used;

FIGS. 11 and 12 are a partial side plan view and a bottom view of the inner end of the valve stem, illustrating the sealloped configuration of the flange thereof;

FIG. 13 is a partial sectional view ofstill another valve, having a tubular valve stem and a valve stem plug affixed to it;

FIG. 14 is a partial sectional view of another embodiment of valve stem sealer structure;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of the sealer shown in FIG. 14; and

FIGS. 16 and 17 are sectional views of other embodiments of valve stems which may be used especially when the valve stem sealer of FIGS. 14 and 15 is used.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring nowto the drawings, in FIGS. l3 there is shown an aerosol valve 10 which includes a valve body 12, a valve stem 14, a valve stem sealer 16, valve stem biasing means 18, and a sealing gasket 20. The aerosol valve 10 is adapted to be affixed within a valve turret 22 of a valve housing 24 by, for example, crimping the sidewall 26 of the valve turret 22 about the valve body 12, as at 27. The valve housing 24 is adapted to be affixed to an aerosol can, in the well-known manner. The aerosol valve 10 is operated to dispense a product, by depressing and/or tilting the valve stem 14. The valve stem 14 is, in one embodiment of the invention, further adapted to be releasibly locked in an operative position.

More specifically, the valve body 12 of the aerosol valve 10 is of generally tubular construction and has an enlarged diameter head portion 28 and a reduced diameter tail portion 30 which forms a dip tube attachment tail to which a dip tube (not shown) of the type that is generally used can be affixed. A valve stem cavity 32 is formed in the head portion 28 and below it, in the tail portion 30, is formed a cavity 34 for receiving and retaining the valve stem biasing means 18, which may be a spring, as illustrated. The bottom wall of the cavity 34 forms a support surface 36 for the valve stem biasing means, and hasan orifice 38 in it through which the product can flow to the valve stem cavity 32.

In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1 to 6, the valve stem sealer l6 has a reduced diameter portion 40 on its bottom which is engaged by the valve stem biasing means 18, to retain the latter in aligned, operative relationship with the sealer 16. The sidewall 42 of the valve stem sealer I6 flares angularly outward near its top, so that its top wall 44 engages against the sealing gasket 20, at a spaced distance about the aperture 46 formed in it. The sidewall 47 of the valve stem cavity is correspondingly flared angularly outward near its top, so as to accommodate the valve stem sealer 16. The top wall 44 of the valve stem sealer 16 has a cone-shaped cavity 48 formed in it (FIG. 2), which flows into and joins with a small cylindricalshaped cavity 50 beneath it. The diameter of the cone-shaped .cavity 48, at the top wall 44, is substantially larger than the at its base, is larger than the diameter of the aperture 46 in the sealing gasket 20, so that the base forms an annular rim 56 which abuts against the sealing gasket 20 to prevent the valve stem 14 from being removed, by pulling it out, once the aerosol valve 10 is assembled. The angle or taper of the sidewall 58 (FIG. 2) of the inner end 54 is less than that of the sidewall of the cone-shaped cavity 48, so that a space or expansion chamber 60 is provided between these sidewalls when the tip of the end 54 is engaged within the cylindrical-shaped cavity 50, as illustrated in FIG. 1. Orifice ports 62 are formed in the side wall 58 of end 54 and extend into the cavity 64 of the tubular stem portion 52 of the valve stem. The valve stem portion 52 extends through the aperture 46 in the sealing gasket 20 and the aperture 66 in the top wall of the valve turret 22 a substantial length above the valve turret 22, so that it .can be depressed and/or tilted by pushing it with a finger to operate the aerosol valve. A button or actuator of appropriate design, not shown, may be affixed to the valve stem, via anchor tabs 65.

The sealing gasket 20 is an annular-shaped resilient ring, preferably rubber, and the aperture 46 in it is slightly smaller in diameter than that of the stem portion 52 of the valve stem. A tight seal is therefore provided about the stem portion 52 to prevent leakage.

The aperture 66 in the valve turret 22is preferably of such diameter that the stem portion 52 of the valve stem 14, may be tilted, but only to a limited extent (See FIGS. 5 and 6). Sealing gasket 20 also seals the aperture 66, to prevent leakage.

The valve stem sealer 16 is loosely retained within the valve stem cavity 32, as illustrated, so that the product to be dispensed can flow between the sidewalls of the sealer and the cavity of the valve body. Alternatively, a tighter, slidable fit can be provided so that the sealer 16 is slidably retained in vertical alignment within cavity 32. In such instance, a number of grooved slots (not shown) are formed in the sidewall of either or both, the sealer l6 and the cavity 32, to permit the product to flow past the sealer.

As indicated above, the aerosol valve 10 is operated to dispense a product, either by depressing and/or tilting the valve stem 14. When depressing the valve stem 14, a valve button (not shown) is advantageously afiixed to the end of the stem portion 52.

The aerosol valve 10 has a cam-type action between the valve stem 14 and the sealer 16. As can be seen in FIG. 2, when the valve stem 14 is tilted to operate the aerosol valve 10, the sidewall 58 of the inner end 54, near its tip, cams against the rim of the cavity'50. This camming action forces the sealer 16 to move downwardly within the cavity 32, thereby breaking the seal between its top wall 44 and the sealing gasket 20. The product therefore is now free to flow into the cone-shaped cavity 48 in the sealer 16 and through the orifice ports 62 in the inner end 54 into the cavity of the valve stem 14 from which it is dispensed.

As indicated above, the space between the sidewalls of the cone-shaped cavity 48 and the inner end 54 function as an expansion chamber 60 for the product. As the product flows into the expansion chamber 60, it is caused to swirl because of the curvature of these sidewalls and, simultaneously, it is permitted to preexpand to some degree before being forced through the orifice ports 62 into cavity of the valve stem. Upon passing through the orifice ports 62, the preexpanded product is partially mechanically broken up so that product is thereafter more uniformly dispersed.

When the valve stem 14 is released, the valve stem biasing means 18 forcibly urges the sealer l6 upwardly, to effect a seal between its top wall 44 and the sealing gasket 20. The flow of the product is thereby shut off to prevent further dispensing of it.

As can be seen in FIG. 3, when the valve stem 14 is depressed, the inner end 54 of the valve stem cams against the sealer 16 and likewise causes it to be depressed, in the manner described above. When released, the top wall 44 of the sealer 16 seals against the sealing gasket 20, to shut off the flow of product.

In FIGS. 4-6, another aerosol valve 70 is shown which is substantially like the aerosol valve 10, and the like parts thereof arecorrespondingly numbered. The primary difference between the-aerosol valves 10 and 70 is in the shape of the cavity formed in the sealer 16. In the valve 70, atruncated cone-shaped cavity 48 (FIG, 5) is formed in the top wall 44 ofthe valvestem sealer 16, concentrically about the cylindricalshaped cavity 50 beneath it. With this construction, an annu-- lar shelf 72 is provided above the cavity 50.

The aerosol valve 70 operates in the'same ma'nneras the aerosol valve 10, however, when the valve stem is tilted suf ficiently, the tip of the inner end 54 will seat on the shelf 72, as illustrated in FIG. 6. The tip willstay seated on the shelf 72, until the valve stem 14"is forcibly urged to disengage it to reseat in the cylindrical-shaped cavity '50. Accordingly, the aerosol valve 70 can be operated to releasibly lock the valve stem 14 in a position to dispense the product, and it-will' remain in this position until it is released.

In FIG. 7, there is shown still another aerosol valve which may be operated to dispense a product, by tilting its valve stem. The primary difference in the aerosol valve 80is the. shape of its valve stem sealer 82 and the inner end 84 of the? The valve stem sealer 82 of the aerosol valve 80 is generally cylindrical-shaped and of a size so as to be reciprocallyopeia.

ble in the valve stem cavity 32 in the valve body 12. As indicated above, the valve stem sealer can be loosely received thereinor, alternatively, can be more tightly fitted. In the latter case, groove slots (not shown)are.fornred in its sidewalls. Recessed circular-shaped cavities and, 92 which are advantageously of the same diameters so that the valve stem sealed 82 can be reversibly placed in the valve stem cavi ty 32 are formed in the top and bottom walls 94 and 95, respectively, of the valve stem sealer. When assembled, the rim 93 (in the illustrated case) fonns a seal with the sealing gasket 20, in the same manner as described above.

The inner end 84 of the valve stem 14 is preferably a circular-shaped, flat plate which has a diameter substantially corresponding to the diameters of the circular-shaped cavities 90 and 92 so that it will seat within them, as illustrated in FIG; 7. The cavity of the stem portion 86 of the valve. stem 14, in this case, extends through the inner end 84.

To operate the aerosol valve 80, its valve stem 14 is. tilted and this action causes the inner end 84 to cam against the bot-- out through the cavity of valve stem 14. The annular cavity .98 I

formed between the walls ofthe valve stem sealer 82 and the valve stem cavity 32 and the recessed cavity 90 in the valve stem sealer 82 function as a combination of swirling and expansion chamber to mechanically break up and preexpand the product before it is dispensed, so as to provide a more satisfactory spray. 4 I

In FIG. 8, there is illustrated an aerosol valve which is generally like the valve 80, however, the inner end of its valve stem 14 and its valve stem sealer. 102- have been modified. With the valve 100, it can be seen that the inner end 104 of the valve stem 14 is closedexcept for an orifice 106 extending through it into the cavity 64 within the valve stem.

The valve button sealer 102 has a deep large diameter cavity 110 and a small diameter cavity 112 concentrically formed in each of its two faces. The cavities 110 have diameters substantially corresponding to'the diameter of the inner end of the valve stem 14. The cavities 112 have diameters substantially corresponding to the diameter of the valve stem biasing means 18, so as to form both a seat for the valve biasing means 18 and a drain chamber, depending upon their positions within the valve stem cavity, as illustrated. The valve 100, as described, is operable by tilting the valve stem 14, however, a number of supply grooves 114 preferably are formed in the bottom wall of the cavities 110, leading into the cavities or drain chambers 112, so that the valve also can be operated by vertically depressing the valve stem 14, as described below.

When the valve stem 14 is tilted and/or depressed, the seal between the top wallof the valve stem sealer 102 and the sealing gasket is broken. This permits the product to flow into the cavity 110, through the supply grooves 114, and into the cavity or drain chamber 112. From thedrain chamber 112, it flows through the orifice 106 into the cavity 64 in the valve stem, from which it is dispersed.

In addition to having the features of the valves 10, 70 and 80, the valve 100 has an improved anticlogging feature, for the product being confined, to some degree, in the supply grooves 114 and the supply chamber 1 12 has a tendency to blow out any dried product or other foreign matter. With this characteristic, it is less subject to clogging.

Referring now to FIGS. 9-11, there are shown three aerosol valves 120, 130 and 140 which are generally similar to the valves 10, 70, 80 and 100, however, each of them is slightly modified, in the manner described below. These valves 120, 130 and 140 each also have a valve body 12, a valve stem 14, a valve stem sealer 16, valve stem biasing means 18, and a sealing gasket 20, and are affixed to an aerosol can, in the above described manner.

la the embodiment shown in FIG; 9, the valve stem sealer 16 has a reduced-diameter portion 121 on its bottom which is engaged by the valve stem biasing means 18, to retain the latter in alined operative relationship with the sealer 16. The top wall 122 of the valve stem sealer 16 engages against the sealing gasket 20, at a spaced distance about the aperture 46 formed in it, and has a cylindrical-shaped cavity 123 formed in it for receiving and retaining an annular flange .124 integrally fonned on the inner end of the valve stem 14. The diameter of the flange 124 is substantially larger than the diameter of the aperture 46 in the sealing gasket 20, to prevent the valve stem 14 from being pulled out of the valve. A smaller diameter cylindrical-shaped drain cavity 125 is formed concentric with and in the bottom wall 126 of the cavity 123. I

The valve stem 14 is tubular and has a closed inner end 54 surrounded by the annular flange 124; An' orifice port 127 is positioned above the drain cavity 125 and. extends into the cavity 64 of the valve stem. Sweep through grooves 128 also are preferably formed in the bottom wall 126 of the cavity 123 extending into the drain cavity 125 so that the valve can be operated by both tilting and vertically depressing the valve stem 14. The valve stem extends through-the aperture 46 in the sealing gasket 20 and the aperture 66 in the top wall of the valve turret 22 a substantial length above the valve turret 22, so that it can be depressed and/or tilted by pushing it with a finger to operate the aerosol valve. A button or actuator of appropriate design, not shown, may be affixed to the valve stem.

When the valve stem 14 is tilted to operate the aerosol valve 120, the flange 124 cams against the bottom wall 126 of the cavity 123. This camming actionforces the sealer 16 to move downwardly within the cavity 32, thereby breaking the seal between its top wall Y122 and the sealing gasket 20. The product therefore is now free to flow into the cavity 123 in the sealer 16, through the sweep-through-grooves 128 into the drain cavity 125 and through the orifice port 127 in the inner end 54 into the cavity of the valve stem 14 from which it is dispensed.

When the valve stem 14 is depressed, the inner end of the valve stem cams against the sealer 16 and likewise causes it to be depressed, in the manner described above. When the valve stem 14 is released, the valve stem biasing means 18 forcibly urges the sealer 16 upwardly, to efi'ect a seal between its top wall 122 and the sealing gasket 20. The flow of the product is thereby shut off to prevent further dispensing of it.

In FIG. 10, the aerosol valve 130 is shown and it can be seen that its valve stem also is tubular and has a closed inner end which is surrounded by an annular flange 131. Beneath the flange 131 there also is a generally semicircular shaped tip 132 which has an orifice port 133 in it extending into the cavity 64 of the valve stem. Alternatively, or additionally, at least one orifice port 134 can be formed in the flange 131 extending into the cavity 64. Also, the flange 131 can be scalloped, as illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, for improved operation when the orifice ports 134 are formed in the flange 131.

The valve stem sealer 16 is generally like the sealer 82 of valve in FIG. 7, in that it has a cavity 136 in each of its two faces for receiving and retaining the flange 131 of the inner end of the valve stem or, alternatively, the biasing means 18. In other words, it is reversible. The sealer 16 also has a deep, smaller drain cavity 137 concentrically formed with and in the bottom wall 138 of the cavity 136, for receiving the tip 132. Sweep-through grooves 139 also are preferably formed in the bottom wall 138, extending into the drain cavity 137.

The aerosol valve operates in generally the same manner as described above. When the valve stem 14 is tilted or vertically depressed, the seal between the top wall of the valve stem sealer 16 and the sealing gasket 20 is broken, thereby permitting the product to flow into the cavity 136. From the cavity 136, the product flows through the sweepthrough grooves 139 into the drain cavity 137 and through the orifice port 133 into the cavity of the valve stem. The curvature of the drain cavity 137 and of the tip 132 causes the product to swirl about the drain cavity until it finds entrance into the orifice port 133. Also, if an orifice port 134 is formed in the flange 131, some product will flow through it into the cavity of the valve stem.

Upon releasing the valve stem 14, the biasing means 18 forcibly urges the valve stem sealer 16 upward to effect a seal between its top wall and the sealing gasket 20, to cutoff product flow. Any product which remains in the valve stem drains back into the drain cavity 137, and is effectively blown out the next time the valve is operated.

in FIG. 13, the aerosol valve 140 is shown and it can be seen that it has a valve stem sealer 16 which is generally cylindricalshaped with cylindrical-shaped cavities 142 in each of its two faces so that it is reversible. A smaller diameter drain cavity 143 also is formed in the bottom wall 144 of each of the cavities 142, concentric therewith, and sweep-through grooves 149 are formed in the bottom wall 144 extending into it. When assembled, the stop wall of the valve stem sealer 16 forms a seal with the sealing gasket 20 in the same manner as described above.

The valve stem 14 is a tubular, open ended one having a valve stem plug 145 affixed to its inner end. The plug 145 includes a circular-shaped, flat plate 146 which has a diameter substantially corresponding to the diameters of the cavities 142 so that it will seat withinthem, as illustrated. Affixed to the plate 146 is a stem portion 147 which is adapted to tightly fit within the open inner end of the valve stem. An orifice port 148 extends through the plate 146 and the stem portion 147. with th plug 145 afiixed to the valve stem 14, it can be seen that its inner end is generally of the same configuration as the valve stem of the valve 120. The plug 145, therefore, permits an ordinary, inexpensive tubular valve stem to be used.

The valve stem structure shown in FIGS. 16 and 17 are al temate structures that may be used especially as alternatives for the valve stem of FIG. 9. As is noted, the restricted orifice may be located intermediate the ends or at the outer end of the valve stem. indeed when so relocated, use of a valve button may be avoided for further economies.

To operate the aerosol valve 140, its valve stem 14 is tilted or depressed to cause the valve stem sealer to move downwardly and thereby break the seal between its top wall and the sealing gasket 20. The product now is permitted to flow into the recessed cavity 142, and from there through the sweep-through grooves l49 into the drain cavity 143. The

drain cavity 143 functions as a combination swirling and expansion chamber to mechanically break up and preexpand the product before it is dispensed, via the orifice port 148 and the cavity in the valve stem, so as to provide a more satisfactory spray.

sealer.

As best seen in FIG. 15, tangential channels or passageways 160 are formed in the bottom of sealer cavity 162 from the edge of wall 164 to the center of the sealer where they terminate in a well 166. In use, well 166 is located directly below stern orifice 127 (of the valve of FIG. 9). Although four channels or passageways 164 are shown, it is to be understood that more or less may be provided. The channels also act as drain cavities for stem 14.

These tangential channels or passageways 164 cause further swirling of the product when the valve is actuated. This breaks up the product in addition to producing a more efficient spray pattern.

It has been found that the provision of a cylindrical post 168 extending upwardly from the center of well 166 further assists this swirling action.

Use of the sealer swirl chamber frequently enables elimination of the valve button. In such instance, the cavity within the valve stem may have a restricted orifice 170 intermediate or at the outer end of the valve stem, as seen in FIGS. 16 and 17, in addition to that shown in FIG. 9. Further swirl inducing means, such as vanes, etc. may be incorporated into the wall of said cavity to enhance the mechanical breakup ability of the valve.

The benefits derived from the use of a sealer swirl chamber may be listed as follows:

I. The well enables the product in the stem to drain into the well instead of:

a. plugging'the stem cavity;

b. building up residue between the lower flange of the stem and the valve sealer (especially where large particles, as in antiperspirant are involved) to cause leaking; and

c. causing adherence between the bottom of valve stem and valve sealer with products such as hair spray and paint to cause a plugged valve or a hard to open valve; and

2. The tangential passageways:

a. allow any crystalized product in well to be redissolved by fresh product, starch, fabric finish, window cleaners;

b. allow product to become better blended with propel lant before being dispensed into cavity of valve stem; and

c. allow product concentrate to become better blended before spraying where concentrates are not stable and have a tendency to separate.

It allows the use of a one-piece valve stem and button. Micro orifices may also be utilized in the plug to insure consistent low spray rates. In addition it allows insertion of a valve stem with a restricted orifice already molded therein to give double stem metering.

Instead of the swirl chamber being incorporated in the valve sealer as shown in FIG. 14, it could be incorporated in the base of the stem. In this case the sealer would be in the alternative either flat withonly a post, flat with no post or provided with only a drain chamber or with a drain chamber and a post.

It will thus be seen that the objects set forth above, among those made apparent from the preceding description, are effi ciently attained, and since certain chart es ma be made in the above construction without departing rom t e scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention, which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

I claim:

1. An aerosol valve comprising, in combination: a tubular valve body, a valve stem sealer with a top wall having a cavity therein, said sealer being disposed within the cavity of said valve body, a sealing gasket, biasing means within said valve body normally biasing said sealer against said sealing gasket to sealsaid valve, a tubular valve stem with its inner end extending into said cavity in the top wall of said sealer, said inner end having a configuration such as to cam against said valve stem sealer to cause it to move downwardly within said cavity to break the seal of said valve to thereby permit a product to flow into and through said tubular valve stem, said cavity in the top wall of said sealer having a well formed in its bottom with at least one passageway which leads tangentially to said well, and further wherein said well and said. passageway constitute a swirl chamber.

2. The aerosol valve of claim 1 wherein said swirl chamber has four passageways.

3. The aerosol valve of claim 1 wherein said well has a vertical post extending upwardly from the center of said well.

4. The aerosol valve of claim 1 wherein said valve stem has a restricted orifice in its cavity.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION patent 3,547,405 Dated December 15, 1970 Inventor(s) Rnald Ewald It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 7 lines 21 and 24 '164" should read 160 Signed and sealed this 16th day of March 1971 (SEAL) Attest:

WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, J

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR.

Commissioner of Patent Attesting Officer

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3647120 *28 Oct 19707 Mar 1972Vca CorpMixing valve for dispensers
US3675832 *3 Aug 197011 Jul 1972Coster Tecnologie Speciali SpaAerosol valve
US3708090 *21 May 19702 Jan 1973Harris AValve for pressurized liquid dispenser
US4405065 *5 Aug 198220 Sep 1983Beard Walter CTilt valve structure with bridged stop for viscous flow liquids
US4418847 *2 Jul 19826 Dec 1983Beard Walter CTip sealing tilt valve structure for viscous flow liquids
US4441635 *1 Nov 198210 Apr 1984Beard Walter CDirect high flow aerosol-type valve with moveable cup
US4444339 *30 Dec 198224 Apr 1984Walter BeardTiltable valve employing a moveable cup
US4450984 *5 Aug 198229 May 1984Beard Walter CViscous flow tilt valve for pressurized container
US4450985 *18 Nov 198229 May 1984Beard Walter CReclosable valve with separate internal seal means and seal removing means therefor
US4501409 *18 Nov 198226 Feb 1985Cook International, Inc.Tilt valve
US5605258 *9 Feb 199625 Feb 1997Abplanalp; Robert H.Two-piece aerosol valve for vertical or tilt action
US726724820 May 200311 Sep 2007Seaquist Perfect Dispensing ForeignAerosol dispenser for mixing and dispensing multiple fluid products
US7299801 *4 Sep 200327 Nov 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyMetering valve for a metered dose inhaler providing consistent delivery
US73571581 Sep 200515 Apr 2008Seaquist Perfect Dispensing ForeignAerosol dispenser for mixing and dispensing multiple fluid products
CN1042500C *1 Jul 199217 Mar 1999罗伯特亨利阿普拉纳尔普Spray valve device
EP0101272A2 *5 Aug 198322 Feb 1984Walter C. BeardViscous flow tilt valve for pressurized container
EP0108550A2 *25 Oct 198316 May 1984Walter C. BeardImproved direct high flow aerosol-type valve with movable cup
EP0113949A2 *5 Aug 198325 Jul 1984Walter C. BeardHigh flow valve with accelerating cam equipped moveable cup
WO1986002135A1 *26 Sep 198410 Apr 1986Cook IntTilt valve
WO1993001109A1 *2 Jul 199221 Jan 1993Abplanalp Robert HImproved tilt action aerosol valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/354, 222/402.24, 222/402.22
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/46
European ClassificationB65D83/46