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Publication numberUS3511193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date12 May 1970
Filing date18 Jul 1967
Priority date18 Jul 1967
Publication numberUS 3511193 A, US 3511193A, US-A-3511193, US3511193 A, US3511193A
InventorsSchild Edwin F
Original AssigneeSchild Edwin F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shelf and bracket structure
US 3511193 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1970 E. F. SCHILD 3,511,193

SHELF AND BRACKET STRUCTURE Filed July 18, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I IVENTOR.

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1 5% B1 1 1TE g h 51 11% mi E U 1 B Y 2 j L A7 -TORNE YS May 12, 1970 E. F. SCHILD SHELF AND BRACKET STRUCTURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 \\\\\\\Q l Filed July 18, 1967 LWENTOK ZZZHZ)? if United States Patent O 3,511,193 SHELF AND BRACKET STRUCTURE Edwin F. Schild, 1683 Beaver Pond, Inverness Countryside, llI. Filed July 18, 1967, Ser. No. 654,105 Int. Cl. A47b 96/02 US. Cl. 108152 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The shelving construction including a vertical support unit with a shelf member and a bracket for supporting the shelf member with the bracket having outwardly facing surfaces uniquely coacting with novel bracket engaging elements on the shelf member for holding the bracket in stabilized position.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to improvements in shelving and particularly to a shelving assembly formed of parts which are shipped disassembled and are assembled on location to form strong rigid continuous shelving of the type used in stores and wherein the brackets have a particular unique relation to the shelving for assembly and disassembly.

In installations for stores of the self-service type, such as grocery stores, long rows of shelving are employed to display products on sale and to make them available to the shopper. In the initial installation in the store it is useful that the shelving can be shipped disassembled and very easily assembled in accordance with the plan of the individual store. The parts must particularly assemble easily and be easy to pack. It is particularly advantageous if the brackets which support the shelving from uprights are removed and can be assembled at the time the rest of the shelving is assembled. Yet it is important that the brackets, which support the entire weight of shelf and contents from the support, be rigidly and effectively structurally related to the other shelving parts to carry a maximum load with maximum stability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An important object of the invention is to provide a simplified bracket structure which is formed of a single sheet of fiat material but which rigidly attaches to the shelf for assemblage.

A further object of the invention is to provide the shelf assembly wherein the bracket can be made free of unnecessary side projections so that it can be packed either relatively flat, or in less space, with the shelf so that the costs of shipping are substantially reduced and more shelves can be packed in the same size carton and less total cartons used thereby enhancing overall handling and shipping.

The above and other objects of the invention are provided in a shelving construction through the utilization of relatively flat embossed projections and corresponding recesses or apertures in the shelf brackets and/or the shelving assemblies carried by the brackets for cooperating releasable engagement which facilitates packaging, handling, shipping, assembly and disassembly of the shelving construction.

Other objects and advantages will become more apparent with the teaching of the principles of the invention in connection with the disclosure of the preferred embodiments thereof in the specification, claims and drawmgs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a shelving combination shown in the assembled form;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary bottom view of one form of shelf arrangement;

FIGS. 3-5 illustrate another form of shelf arrangement which in the description will be referred to as the first arrangement, with FIG. 3 being a vertical sectional view, FIG. 4 being a sectional view taken substantially along line IV-IV of FIG. 3, and FIG. 5 being a fragmentary perspective view;

FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate the' second arrangement of shelving (also illustrated in FIG. 2) with FIG. 6 being an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating the parts being assembled and FIG. 7 being a fragmentary view showing the parts of FIG. 6 assembled;

FIGS. 8-11 illustrate another form which will be referred to as the third arrangement, with FIG. 8 being a vertical sectional view, FIG. 9 being a vertical sectional view, FIG. 10 being a fragmentary bottom plan view with portions in section, FIG. 11 being a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line XIXI of FIG. 8;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary view showing still another form which will be referred to as the fourth arrangement; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the lower surface of an end of a shelf and embodying another form which will be referred to as the fifth arrangement;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view of a portion of the shelf of FIG. 13; and

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional View taken substantially along line XVXV of FIG. 13.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 illustrates a shelving assembly in its completed form. The shelving assembly includes :an upright or back 10 which is adapted to receive brackets 11, 12 and 13. The brackets are attached to the upright in a suitable manner such as that illustrated in my US. Pat. 3,044,632 issued July 17, 1962.

The brackets 11, 12 and 13 support shelves 16, 17 and 18 respectively, with similar brackets supporting the shelves at the other end and also attached to the upright. At the ends of the upright a finishing plate 15 is attached, and the uprights are supported on a floor area by a base 14.

ARRANGEMENT I FIGS. 3-5 show details of construction of a shelf and bracket arrangement which will have the finished general appearance of the arrangement of FIG. 1. A shelf 20 is constructed of material such as sheet metal with an outer edge 22 bent or formed downwardly and an inner edge 23 similarly formed. Near the end of the inner edge 23 is a slot 23a which receives a bracket 24 as it is set in place beneath the end of the shelf 20. For reinforcing, the shelf has ribs 21 extending along its bottom surface and these ribs terminate short of the ends to permit the bracket 24 to be set in place. The end 20a, FIG. 4, is also bent downwardly to form a finished end.

The bracket 24 is formed of a flat section of sheet material, being heavier than the shelving but being stamped or cut with a special shape having fingers or projections 25 for locking into slots on the upright 10 which is shown in FIG. 1.

To attach the bracket 24 to the shelf 20, it is pushed upwardly into seated position and slides between bracket engaging elements or tabs 26 and 27. These tabs engage first and second surfaces 24a and 24b of the bracket.

The tabs are similarly constructed and therefore only tab 26 may be described in detail. The tab 26 has a base leg 26a which is suitably secured to the lower surface of the shelf 20, such as by welding. The tab 26 has a right angled bracket engaging leg 26b which engages the first or inner surface 24a of the bracket. The opposing tab 27 is also welded to the lower surface of the shelf 20 and engages the second surface 24b of the bracket 20. Similar tabs 28 and 29 are positioned near the outer edge of the shelf and the tabs together function to hold the bracket 24 in its oriented position relative to the shelf. The bracket is held upright by virtue of its being supported in this position by the back and since it is fixedly held beneath the shelf it provides reliable and adequate support for the shelf and material placed on the upper surface of the shelf.

To lock the bracket 24 in position for handling the shelf, projections or tangs 24c and 24 project outwardly from the surfaces 24a and 24b of the bracket and extend into recesses or openings 26c and 27c of the tabs 26 and 27. The tabs have a sufficient spring-like quality to permit snapping over the tangs or bosses 24c and 24 This also permits forcible removal of the brackets when the shelving is disassembled.

The tabs such as 26 and 27 are offset in a lineal direction relative to the bracket 24. This permits the openings or pockets 26c and 27c to be at lineally spaced locations so as to receive the lineally spaced bosses 24 and 242. The bosses or tangs are formed in the metal brackets 24 by forcibly projecting a small area of the metal outwardly and this may be done by placing small cuts in metal or dimpling the metal by processes which will be recognized by those skilled in metal Working art. Different forms of dimpling may be employed with one being illustrated wherein the metal is slightly cut and forced outwardly to project beyond one surface of the bracket 24. Similar bosses 24c and 24d project into recesses in the brackets 28 and 29, FIG. 3.

Different constructions of the shelf 20 may be employed with a simplified arrangement shown formed of sheet metal and the shelving construction detail is not material except that it provides a lower surface and an end of the shelf for receiving the bracket and resting thereon.

In FIG. 4, it is contemplated that the tab 27 may be omitted and the end 20a positioned so that it is fiush against the surface 2412 (the portion 20b will be omitted). The bracket will then be held in place solely by the tab 26, and the tang 24c omitted (or in the alternative tang 24c can project into an opening formed in the end 20a).

ARRANGEMENT II FIGS. 2, 6 and 7 illustrate another form of shelf and bracket arrangement wherein one lateral support for the bracket is obtained from bent out portions of the bracket.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, a shelf 30 has a bent down rear edge 31 and a bent down front edge 32 with the finished end 35. Reinforcing ribs 33 extend along beneath the shelf. A bracket 34 seats against the lower surface of the shelf at the end in the manner shown in FIG. 7.

The bracket 34 has side projections 34a and 34b which engage the turn down end 35 of the shelf in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7.

This construction requires pivoting the bracket 34 into place in the manner shown in FIG. 6. As the bracket is pivoted to upright position in the direction shown by the arrow 38, it is then pushed upwardly to seat beneath the shelf and a first side surface 34a is supported by the bracket support element or tab 37. The other supporting surface of the bracket is provided by the end 34b of the bent out portion 34.

For releasably locking the bracket in place a boss or tang 34c projects outwardly from the surface 34a and locks in an opening 37a in the tab 37. Bosses 34c and 34d, FIG. 2, are formed to lock in openings 37a in the ARRANGEMENT III FIGS. 8-11 show a shelving arrangement employing a bracket 50 with fingers 40 for locking the bracket into an upright.

A shelf has an upper plate 51 which is bent downwardly at the rear edge 52 and at the front edge 53. A slot or recess 52a is provided in the insert 51a for receiving the bracket and the bracket has an end shoulder 42 which engages behind a surface 52b which is part of an insert 51a.

Beneath the top plate portion 51 of the shelf is end insert 51a, also formed of sheet metal and welded to the upper portion 51. This insert 51a actually forms the end of the shelf. Bracket engaging tabs 45, 46, 47 and 48 are cut from the end 51a and turned downwardly so that their edges engage the side surface of the bracket. The tabs are positioned so as to engage the side 50a of the bracket (FIG. 11) and are preferably spaced in a linear direction relative to the bracket.

The bracket has pressed out tangs or bosses such as 43, 44, 49 and 50 which project from bracket surface 50a and these engage the tabs 45 and 48 to additionally position the bracket 41 relative to the shelf. These bosses may be arranged to have portions projecting from the other bracket surface 5% to lock in openings 69c and 69d on the shelf end 68.

In the arrangement shown in FIGS. 8-11, the inner side 50a of the bracket is supported by tabs, but the outer side 50b of the bracket is supported by a unique shelf constructiton. As illustrated in FIG. 9, the shelf has an upper plate portion 51 with turned down edges and the insert forming the shelf end 51a fits within and beneath the plate 51 (FIG. ll).

For supporting the second or outer surface 50b of the bracket, the shelf end 51a has a shaped rectangular end 68. This is arranged to provide an inner flat surface 69 which provides support along the lineal length of the bracket. This surface 69 may have recesses such as 69a and 69b for receiving bosses such as 71a, 71b, 71c and 71d to additionally lock the bracket in place. Thus in this arrangement, the bracket is held positively with respect to the end of the shelf although it can be forcibly pulled loose for disassembly.

ARRANGEMENT IV In the arrangement of FIG. 12, a shelf has the general construction of the previous shelves with an insert forming the shelf end 81. The end 83 of the insert end is formed similar to the end 68 in the arrangement of FIG. 11 to provide a support for the outer surface of the bracket.

For support in the inner surface, however, a U-shaped tab 82 is arranged with its feet welded to the lower surface of the insert end 81. The edge of the U-shaped tab engages and supports the bracket which is set in place and tangs or bosses projecting out of the bracket will lock within the loop of the U-shaped tab 82.

FIGS. 13 through 15 show a shelf formed of sheet metal with a top surface 98 (the shelf being in inverted position in FIG. 13) and with a downturned front and back edge 91 and 92. The edges are turned inwardly at 93 and 94 and slots 95 and 96 are provided for receiving a bracket 97 (FIG. 15). The bracket is fiat similar to the construction illustrated in the arrangement of FIGS. 3 and 8.

For holding the brackets in place, clips or tangs are inserted into rectangular openings 99 cut in the shelf surface 98 (FIG. 14). The end of the shelf is turned down as shown at 89. In some instances, the tangs 100 may be welded to the lower surface of the shelf rather than extend through openings.

The tangs 100 have a base portion 101 with end projections 102 which extend a distance longer than the rectangular opening 99 so as to prevent the tang from passing through the opening 99. Spring fingers 105 lock on the undersurface of the shelf top 98 in the manner shown in FIG. 15, when the tang is inserted thus locking it firmly to the shelf.

The tang has spring sides 103 and 104 which grip the sides or the bracket 97 and lock into a perforated slot or hole 106 in the manner shown in FIG. 15.

Thus the bracket can be readily dropped into place through the slots 95 and 96 and held firmly along its upper edge by the tangs 100. The shelf and brackets are shipped and cartoned in the disassembled fiat position and when unpacked at a store or other location where the shelving is to be assembled, the brackets are quickly slid into place to be locked by the tangs on the shelf 90.

It will be understood that in the arrangements I through IV, while a preferred embodiment is shown in each case, various modifications can be accomplished by changing the shape of the holding fingers or changing their construction by striking them from the material of the shelf or by welding additional flat material to the shelf from which the holding fingers are struck. In other words, the fingers may be welded to the shelving or pushed out of the material.

A substantial advantage and advance is achieved by each of the arrangements in that a fiat bracket can be used which can be packed into the carton with the shelf without requiring additional space and more brackets and shelves can be packed into a carton of any given size and with structures heretofore available, and yet the present structure does not sacrifice strength or stability in achieving the saving in space for shipping and handling.

Thus it will be seen that I have provide-d an improved shelving assembly wherein brackets may be formed of simple flat stock material and may be assembled and disassembled in a relatively simple manner. Yet the relationship between the bracket and shelf is one of rigidity and a less complicated lighter weight arrangement is obtained without the sacrifice of strength and instead with the provision of unique additional strength.

The drawings and specification present a detailed disclosure of the preferred embodiments of the invention, and it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific forms disclosed, but covers all modifications, changes and alternative constructions and methods falling within the scope of the principles taught by the invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a shelving construction the combination comprising,

a vertical support unit for carrying shelving,

a bracket having means for attachment to said vertical support and having first and second lateral facing stabilizing side surfaces,

a shelf member having a first bracket engaging element thereon with a lateral facing surface engaging the first surface of the bracket and having a second bracket engaging element thereon with a lateral facing surface engaging the second surface of the bracket with said bracket element surfaces spaced a distance equal to the thickness of said bracket,

one of said bracket engaging elements being formed by the end of the shelf so as to provide an elongate longitudinally extending bracket engaging surface, said lateral surfaces and brackets holding the shelf nonmovable in a direction perpendicular to said lateral surfaces, and

projecting locking elements spaced-apart longitudinally on said bracket holding the bracket relative to the shelf member in a direction parallel to the bracket whereby the bracket is held relatively non-movable but is detachable from said shelf member.

2. In a shelving construction the combination comprising:

a vertical support unit for carrying shelving,

a bracket having means for attachment to said vertical support unit and having first and second lateral facing stabilizing side surfaces,

a shelf member having a first bracket engaging element thereon with a lateral facing surface engaging the first surface of the bracket and having a second bracket engaging element thereon with a lateral facing surface engaging the second surface of the bracket with said bracket element surfaces spaced a distance equal to the thickness of said bracket, at least one of said bracket engaging elements being U-shaped with the end of the U providing said laterally facing surface for engaging the surface of the bracket,

said lateral surfaces and brackets holding the shelf non-movable in a direction perpendicular to said lateral surfaces, and

projecting locking elements spaced-apart longitudinally on said bracket holding the bracket relative to the shelf member in a direction parallel to the bracket whereby the bracket is held relatively non-movable but is detachable from said shelf member.

3. In a shelving construction the combination in accordance with claim 1 wherein said U-shaped bracket engaging element also engages said locking element on the bracket.

4. In a shelving construction the combination comprising,

a vertical support unit for carrying shelves,

a bracket having means for attachment to said vertical support and having first and second lateral facing stabilizing side surfaces,

a shelf assembly including a top supporting surface, front, back and end members depending from said top supporting surface, said front and back members having aligned slots therein adjacent said end members for receiving said bracket within said shelf assembly so as to partially conceal said bracket when in an assembled condition,

means defining an opening in said supporting surface, a holding tang inserted into said opening and having resilient spring sides projecting through the shelf surface for engagement with said bracket, means defining at least one opening in said bracket to receive said resilient spring sides of said holding tang, and means locking said tang in said opening.

5. In a shelving construction in accordance with claim 4 wherein the means for locking the tang includes spring fingers engageable with the undersurface of said shelf member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 813,501 2/1906 Keil 248250 X 2,819,858 1/1958 Mittendorf 248-361 X 3,159,437 1.2/1964 Jentzen 211148 3,199,822 8/1965 Ruhnk 248-243 FOREIGN PATENTS 324,990 2/1930 Great Britain.

96,259 6/ 1960 Norway.

ROY D. FRAZIER, Primary Examiner J. F. FOSS, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 248.243, 250

Patent Citations
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US813501 *27 May 190427 Feb 1906Henry Francis KeilBracket.
US2819858 *2 Dec 195514 Jan 1958Avco Mfg CorpClip for defroster-heaters
US3159437 *11 Dec 19621 Dec 1964Jentzen Miller CompanyDisplay shelving assembly
US3199822 *21 Jun 196210 Aug 1965Garcy CorpSupport clip
GB324990A * Title not available
NO96259A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3603274 *28 Jul 19697 Sep 1971Hirsh CoModular adjustable wall shelving
US4541599 *19 Aug 198317 Sep 1985Westinghouse Electric Corp.Self-locking mounting clip system
US4850285 *18 Jan 198425 Jul 1989Royston Manufacturing CorporationShelving system
US4919282 *13 May 198724 Apr 1990Duff Terry LMovable gondola shelving with hidden shelf adjustment mechanism
US4938442 *21 Jun 19883 Jul 1990Mastrodicasa Arthur RBracket and shelf assembly
US4951908 *20 Jul 198928 Aug 1990James H. KallioShelf assembly for a closet
US5441338 *27 Jul 199215 Aug 1995Donnelly CorporationSnap-on shelf
US5454638 *21 Feb 19953 Oct 1995Donnelly Technology, Inc.Adjustable refrigerator shelving
US5484196 *10 Jan 199416 Jan 1996Pacific Precision Metals, Inc.Medicine cabinet with relocatable cantilever shelves
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US61680322 Jul 19982 Jan 2001Milton J. MerlShelf construction
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US64879786 Jul 20003 Dec 2002Herman Miller Inc.Support system
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US866790822 Apr 201111 Mar 2014Steelcase Inc.Frame type table assemblies
US868970522 Apr 20118 Apr 2014Steelcase, Inc.Reconfigurable table assemblies
US8899162 *16 Dec 20112 Dec 2014Heatcraft Refrigeration Products LlcUnitized shelving
US918597425 May 201217 Nov 2015Steelcase Inc.Frame type workstation configurations
US921099922 Apr 201115 Dec 2015Steelcase Inc.Frame type table assemblies
US959193213 May 201314 Mar 20178157120 Canada Inc.Bracket and wall standard assembly
US963595819 Jun 20152 May 2017Heatcraft Refrigeration Products LlcWeldless shelf assemblies for merchandising display cases
US20070221103 *24 Mar 200627 Sep 2007Equipment Brokers, Inc. D.B.A Rj Trausch Industries, Inc.Shelving assembly
US20100077781 *26 May 20051 Apr 2010Hill Phoenix, Inc.Refrigerator case shelf
US20120292277 *16 Dec 201122 Nov 2012Heatcraft Refrigeration Products LlcUnitized shelving
EP0003800A1 *14 Feb 19795 Sep 1979Rudolf Bohnacker MetallwarenfabrikMetal shelving
WO2006127010A1 *26 May 200530 Nov 2006Carrier CorporationRefrigerator case shelf
WO2013166610A1 *13 May 201314 Nov 20138157120 Canada IncBracket and wall standard assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/152, 248/243, 248/250
International ClassificationA47B57/04, A47B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/045
European ClassificationA47B57/04B