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Publication numberUS3503406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date31 Mar 1970
Filing date28 Oct 1968
Priority date28 Oct 1968
Also published asDE1954034A1
Publication numberUS 3503406 A, US 3503406A, US-A-3503406, US3503406 A, US3503406A
InventorsRiegel Lawrence Murry, White Samuel Brooke
Original AssigneeRiegel Lawrence Murry, White Samuel Brooke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarettes
US 3503406 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 31, 1970 L. M. RIEGEL ETAL 3,503,406

CIGARETTES Filed Oct. 28, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. I

, INVENTORS Lawrence M. RieqcL Samuel Brooke WI'HTe BY h ff" Md w W Mam}! 1970 M. RIEGEL ETAL. 3,

CIGARETTES 2 Sheets-$heet 2 7 Filed Oct. 28, 1968 INVENTORS .IZA

FIG

a a m M e 0 n c r w n Samuel Brooke WHTc ATTOR/VfKS United States Patent O 3,503,406 CIGARETTES Lawrence Murry Riegel, 129 E. 69th St., and Samuel Brooke White, 430 E. 63rd St., both of New York, N.Y.

Filed Oct. 28, 1968, Ser. No. 771,174 Int. Cl. A24d 1/04; A24f /04 U.S. Cl. 131--10 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention concerns improvements in cigarettes and the like; more particularly, it concerns means for controlling the draw, filtration, and air/smoke ratio of a cigarette at the option and under the control of the smoker.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART The prior art is replete with cigarette filters and aeration devices, for improving a smokers enjoyment and protecting his health. Filters of various types and ef fectiveness have been developed and means have been provided for admitting air at the ends of a cigarette in order to modify the air/ smoke ratio of the gases inhaled by a smoker. In some arrangements, specially designed sleeves cooperate with elements on the tip of cigarettes to efiect filtration.

There are a number of factors that combine to determine the pleasure and/or safety of cigarette smoking. A smoker is sensitive to the amount of draw required to inhale a given volume of smoke. In addition, a smoke is sensitive to the strength of the tobacco as reflected by the flavor of the smoke and the ratio of smoke to pure air in the gases inhaled. Still further, the smokers senses are responsive to the amount of tars and nicotine present in the smoke inhaled. In the prior art, means have been shown for modifying each of these salient characteristics of a cigarette; however, there is no known means for selectively controlling each of these features at the will and whimof the smoker.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In general, it may be said that the existing devices used in conjunction with the manufacture of cigarettes do not provide an adjustable control means that satisfies any reasonable proportion of the smoking population. Applicants invention is believed to remedy this situation and provide means which unobtrusively and simply provide the smoker with complete and adjustable control over the volume of smoke inhaled, the amount of drag required to smoke a cigarette, and the amount of air mixed with the smoke.

An object of the invention is to provide improved means for controlling the amount of draw required in order to obtain a predetermined volume of smoke from a cigarette.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved Patented Mar. 31, 1970 means for aerating the combustion gases from a cigarette prior to inhalation by a smoker.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved means for controlling the ratio of air to smoke in the gases inhaled by a smoker.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved means for effecting controlled supplementary filtration of the smoke inhaled.

Yet another object of the invention relates to improved means for achieving each of the above related objects, that can be adapted to utilization with either plain end or filter tip cigarettes.

A number of embodiments of the present invention are set forth hereinafter. In accordance with a first embodiment, flue elements are provided on the tip end of a cigarette and on a sleeve mounted on the tip. The sleeve is adapted for both rotational and axial motion relative to the tip, in order to control the air-smoke ratio and draw. Aeration means 'are selectively positioned in both sleeve and cigarette tip to permit adjustment of the amount of pure air drawn into the cigarette from a point in proximity to the tip. Other embodiments offer increasing amounts and gradations of control and also afford relative independence of control over the various factors.

A complete understanding and appreciation of the invention will become available from the following description which is taken in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGURE 1 illustrates a typical cigarette provided with a control sleeve of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an exploded view of the cigarette shown in FIGURE 1, illustrating the improved control elements used in one embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged partially broken away view of the tip end of a cigarette with a control sleeve in position for limiting the draw and supplementing the filtration of the cigarette;

FIGURE 4 is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette utilizing the embodiment of FIGURES 2 and 3 when the control sleeve is positioned to provide minimal effect upon the characteristics of the cigarette;

FIGURE 5 is a side cross-sectional view of a cigarette utilizing the embodiment of FIGURES 2 and 3 when the control sleeve is positioned to provide maximum effect upon the characteristics of the cigarette;

FIGURE 6 is a schematic illustration of control elements adaptable for use in the control sleeve and tip of a cigarette incorporating the present invention;

FIGURE 7 is a schematic illustrating the functioning of the control elements shown in FIGURE 6 during maximum and minimum effect conditions;

FIGURE 8 is a schematic illustration of another pair of control elements adaptable for use in the control sleeve and tip of a cigarette incorporating the present invention, wherein the control elements are in the form of nesting cones;

FIGURE 9 is a schematic illustrating the functioning of the cone control elements shown in FIGURE 8, as they cooperate to afford maximum and minimum effects upon the smoke inhaled;

FIGURES 10A and 10B illustrate a further embodiment of the invention wherein the control elements of FIGURES 2 through 5 are modified to provide air intake under maximum closure conditions of the elements;

FIGURE 11 is a schematic illustration of control elements of the type shown in FIGURES 6 and 7, modified to provide air intake under maximum closure conditions of the elements;

FIGURES 12A and 12B are schematic illustrations showing a modification of the conical control elements of FIGURES 8 and 9 to provide air intake under maximum closure conditions of the elements, and

FIGURES 13A and 13B illustrate a further embodiment of the invention wherein the control sleeve has an internal coaxial cylinder that cooperates with a cylinder mounted on the tip end of a cigarette to independently ef fect control over the smoke and air inhaled.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The invention is illustrated hereinafter in three specific embodiments. Each of these embodiments partakes of a number of common features and, accordingly, a detailed description of one embodiment only appears to be necessary. This first embodiment is presented in FIGURES 1 through 5. A plurality of control elements and modifications are shown in the remaining figures. The interaction of the elements shown in FIGURES 6-13, to effect the desired controls, will be clear once an understanding of the first embodiment is achieved. The distinctive characteristics of each control element, of course, will be set forth in detail during individual consideration of the figures.

FIGURE 1 illustrates a cigarette 10 having a control sleeve 11 mounted as the mouthpiece thereof. Mouthpiece 11 includes a plurality of perforations 13. These perforations extend through the sleeve of the mouthpiece 11 and provide means for aeration as explained hereinafter. Recessed within the mouthpiece is a control element 12 having perforations 15 therein. It will be understood that element 12 may be made of plastic or other material. The perforations 15 are of a discrete nature; on the other hand, the aeration perforations 13 are smaller and may not be discemable by the naked eye.

FIGURE 2 is an exploded view wherein the control sleeve 11 has been removed from the cigarette itself. Considering first the cigarette, it will be seen to include a tip 16 which is affixed to the tobacco portion 20. This may, in fact, be a filter tip of the type well known in the art. The invention is also suitable for use directly with nonfilter cigarettes. In the latter instance, a cylindrical member would be provided over the tobacco and the interior of tip 16 would comprise tobacco rather than a filter element. Tip 16 includes aeration perforations 19 which are shown to be rotationally oriented 90 away from the aeration perforations 13 appearing in sleeve 11. Element 16 also includes a control element 17 having holes 18 therein. Thus, it will be seen by referring to the sleeve member 11 that the sleeve 11 and tip 16 are adapted to complement one another.

The operation and functioning of the control unit shown in this embodiment may best be appreciated by consideration of FIGURES 3, 4, and 5. FIGURE 3 is an enlarged view of the control unit with a portion of the sleeve 11 broken away to reveal the juxtapositioning of control elements 12 and 17. FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view across a vertical plane through FIGURE 3, with the sleeve 11 slightly moved away from the tip 16 in an axial direction. FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIGURE 4, wherein the sleeve 11 is moved closer to the tip 16 and is rotated 90 from the position shown in FIGURES 3 and 4.

The control elements 12, 17 cooperate as dampers to establish the amount of gases flowing from the burning tobacco to the smoker. Their effectiveness in this function is determined primarily by their relative rotational positioning, and secondarily by their relative axial positioning. The perforations 15, 18 are arranged on the respective control elements 12, 17 to completely block passage of the gases in at least one relative rotational position, when the control elements are in contact with each other. As this relative rotational position is gradually changed, by manual manipulation of the smoker, perforations 15, 18 are gradually brought into coincidence until the con- 4 trol elements 12, 17 offer a minimum impedance to the passage of the gases.

The damping effect of control elements 12, 17 from the standpoint of the axial displacement thereof, can be appreciated by consideration of FIGURES 4 and 5. Clearly, when the elements 12, 17 are in close proximity as shown in FIGURE 5, their relative rotational position only will determine their damping effect. When the elements 12, 17 are separated as shown in FIGURE 4, the gases are free to select new axial paths in the separation region 21, and hence the relative rotational positioning of the elements becomes of decreasing damping effectiveness as the separation is increased.

It will be appreciated that when the smoke from the burning tobacco is cut off, the draw becomes harder. In order to maintain a relatively constant draw while limiting the smoke inhaled, aeration perforations 13 and 19 are provided. It is contemplated that the regions on the sleeve and tip containing the perforations are in coincidence when control elements 12, 17 are rotationally positioned for maximum damping. Thus, for example, by rotating the sleeve 11 in FIGURE 3 through the typical air holes 13 and 19 are brought into coincidence and a fully aerated smoke is provided. The degree of aeration can also be controlled by the axial positioning of the sleeve. Thus, the regions containing perforations 13 and 19 overlap more or less depending upon whether the sleeve 11 is pushed in all the way, or pulled out.

Another feature of the invention concerns the additional or supplementary filtration afforded by control elements 12 and 17. The density and the actual size of the holes 15, 18 can be varied by the designer. If the holes are small, there is a collection of combustion products at the periphery of each hole as the smoke is passed therethrough. The amount of combustion products collected upon the control elements 12, 17 increases in accordance with the closeness between the plates and their relative rotational positioning. Quite clearly, when the sleeve 11 is positioned as shown in FIGURE 4, separation region 21 provides considerable room for the smoke to pass through each of the perforations. As the control elements 12, 17 are brought together by axial movement of the sleeve 11, the region 21 is constricted and the elements will collect larger amounts of combustion products.

FIGURES 6 and 7 illustrate different control elements 30, 31 that may be employed in place of the elements 12, 17 previously described. Elements 30 and 31 are provided in the sleeve and on the tip respectively. Each element contains a solid portion 32, 33 and a plurality of arcuate sector openings, 34 and 35, respectively. Clearly, by rotating the sleeve element 30 relative to the tip element 31 it is possible to completely block off all gases from the burning cigarette.

As in the case of the arrangement depicted in FIGURES 1 through 5, aeration perforations are provided in order to permit adjustment of the air/smoke ratio. FIGURE 7 is provided to illustrate the rotational positioning of the flue elements during use. For purposes of visual clarity, in this figure, the solid material of the elements 30, 31 is depicted by cross-hatched lines. The aeration perforations 36, 37 are depicted by xxx.

The left-hand portion of FIGURE 7, the tip element 31 and the sleeve element 30 are in rotational coincidence with element 30 in the foreground. Thus, openings 34 and 35 are is alignment. The aeration perforations 36 in the tip are illustrated at the top and bottom of the sketch, and aeration perforations 37 on the sleeve are positioned approximately 45 counter-clockwise from perforations 36. Thus, in order to bring aeration perforations 36 and 37 into coincidence, it is necessary to rotate the sleeve 45 in a clockwise direction. This condition is illustrated in the right-hand portion of FIGURE 7. Obviously, when the sleeve is rotated in this fashion, the flue is completely closed.

It should be recalled that the sleeve is both axially and rotationally adjustable. Thus, when control elements 30, 31 are not in close proximity, the sleeve may be rotationally adjusted to increase the air/smoke ratio. When this is done, the full volume of gases comprising the combination of air and smoke is available. In order to limit the amount of combined gases reaching the smokers mouth, it is simply necessary to move the control elements 30, 31 closer together by pushing in the sleeve.

FIGURES 8 and 9 illustrate another pair of suitable control elements for use in the embodiment of the invention previously described. These elements comprise cone members 40 and 41 adapted for positioning within the sleeve and on the cigarette tip, respectively. Cone members 40, 41 contain perforations 42 and 43 throughout alternate quadrants. The elements are tapered at the same angle so that a nesting relationship is provided for cone 40 within cone 41. Once again, it will be seen that suitable rotational and axial alignment of the elements will provide controllable damping of the gases that are passed.

FIGURE 9 illustrates the relative position of aeration perforations 44 and 45 on the sleeve and tip respectively, when the cone type of control element is employed. The left-hand portion of FIGURE 9 shows the elements 40, 41 in opened position with element 40 in the foreground. The aeration perforations are displaced by 90 when the cone elements are positioned in coincidence. By rotating the sleeve 90 in either direction, the perforations are brought into coincidence and provide a maximum air/ smoke ratio. The amount of damping provided with any particular rotational positioning of the cone control elements is controlled by their relative axial positions.

It will be apparent that the invention should not be restricted by the number of arcuate sector openings in the control elements 30, 31 of FIGURES 6 and 7, or by the number of perforated areas 42, 43 in the conical control elements 40, 41 of FIGURES 8 and 9. This is merely a matter of choice within the control of the designer.

In the embodiments of the invention thus far described, it will be noted that the damping effect of the filter is effective upon the combined gas provided by both the burning tobacco and the aeration perforations. In some instances, it may be desirable to effectively bypas the flue with air when the damping of the smoke is maximal. FIGURES A through 12B disclose another embodiment of the invention wherein means are provided for effecting a controlled air bypass irrespective of the axial position of the sleeve.

In the exploded View of FIGURE 10A, a sleeve 50 is shown having aeration perforations 51 in diametrically opposed areas and a control element 52. The control element 52 has a plurality of holes 53 similar to the holes described in connection with FIGURES 3-5. In addition, control element 52 has a series of V shaped notches 54 disposed at diametrically opposed peripheral areas. These notches are axially aligned with aeration perforations 51.

The tip 55 of the cigarette shown in FIGURE 10A is provided with a perforated control element 56, and aeration holes 57. In this instance also, it will be seen that V shaped notches 58 are provided in axial alignment with aeration perforations 57. The axial displacement of the aeration perforations 57 from element 56 is the same as the axial displacement of aeration perforations 51 from filter element 52 in the sleeve 50. Thus, when the sleeve and tip are in rotational coincidence, there is coincidence between both aeration perforations 51, 57 and the notches 54, 58. This is illustrated more clearly in FIGURE 10B.

As shown in FIGURE 10B, the sleeve 50 has been rotated 90 so that notches 54 and 58 are in alignment. At the same time, perforations 57 and 51 are in alignment. When the sleeve is in its forwardmost position, the aeration perforations are in substantial coincidence in all respects, both rotational and axial, and thus there is maximum air flow as shown by arrow 59 through the aeration perforations 51, 57, the tip 55, and the notches 58, 54. With the sleeve 50 pushed forward, a minimum of combustible gases are passed by the control elements. In order to increase the amount of combustible gases provided, the sleeve 50 is axially pulled back to the left and/or r0- tated. In order to alter the air/smoke ratio, the sleeve is rotated.

FIGURES 11 and 12 disclose modifications of the embodiment just described in order to incorporate control elements similar to those shown in FIGURES 6-9.

The control elements shown in FIGURE 11 are modified versions of those described in connection with FIG- URES 6 and 7. In the present instance, the solid portions of the sleeve element 60 contain open sectors 61 and open arcs 62; the arcs appearing near the periphery of the normally solid areas. Corresponding tip control element 63 contains open sectors 64 and open arcs 65. The relative positions of the aeration perforations 66 and 67 on the sleeve and tip respectively, are again illustrated by xxx. With the teachings of the embodiment shown in FIG- URES 10A and 10B in mind, it will be appreciated that the arcuate slots 62 and 65 serve the same function as the V shaped notches in the preceding figures. Thus, aeration is provided even when the smoke is fully damped by rotational closure of control elements 60, 63.

FIGURES 12A and 12B illustrate the use of coneshaped control elements in the embodiment described relative to FIGURES 10A and 10B. In this instance, the unrestricted passage of air when the cones are in full engagement is provided by cutting back the edge of the element in the tip in order to provide a circumferential cavity even when the cones are nested within one another. FIGURE 12A shows cones 70 and 71 mounted in sleeve 72 and tip 73 respectively. This figure also illustrates aligned aeration perforations 74 and 75. It is assumed that this view shows the control elements 70, 71 maximally closed, and therefore a minimum of smoke is being passed. Under this condition, aeration perforations 74 and 75 permit air flow through the space 76 between the sleeve and the tip, and also through the tip itself into circumferential cavity 77. From this cavity, the air goes through perforations 78 in conical element 70 and out. Once again, the air/smoke ratio and damping are controlled by rotational and axial displacement of the sleeve.

FIGURES 13A and 13B illustrate still another embodiment of the invention. This embodiment differs from its predecessors in that the pure air which alters the air/ smoke ratio does not pass through any of the control elements. As shown in FIGURE 13A, the sleeve 80 contains an outer cylindrical portion and an inner cylinder 82. The outer cylinder contains aeration perforations 83 which are in coincidence with aeration perforations 84 on the inner cylinder. A space 85 is provided between the inner and outer cylinders of the sleeve. At the back of the inner cylinder 82, a control element 86 is mounted. The positioning of element 86 is illustrated in FIGURE 13B. In this illustration of the embodiment, control elements of the type shown in FIGURES 6 and 7 are employed. It is equally acceptable to utilize control elements of the type shown in FIGURES 25, or 8.

The cigarette 90 in FIGURE 13A contains a tip portion 91 in the form of a cylinder having a diameter adapted to fit within the space 85 of the sleeve. Ti 91 contains aeration perforations 92 and a control element 93 axially positioned to bring the perforations 92 into coincidence with perforations 83, 84, when flue elements 86 and 93 are in close proximity.

Considering FIGURE 13B, it will be seen from this side cross-sectional view taken from a vertical plane through the cigarette, that the sleeve 80 and cigarette 90 are mounted in operating positions. As illustrated, the sleeve 80 has been rotationally positioned to bring the air perforations 83, 84 into radial alignment with aeration perforations 92 of the tip cylinder. Not all perforations are in alignment, because the sleeve has not been pressed to its maximum forward position. Thus, a particular intermediate air/smoke ratio is established. This ratio may be varied without changing the total amount of combustible gases by changing the axial position of the sleeve 80. It may also be varied by limiting the amount of combustible gases by rotating the sleeve 80. In this embodiment, the aeration perforations may be positioned in order to permit maximum air intake when the control elements 86, 93 completely damp the smoke and to provide minimum air intake with maximum smoke passage at the other extreme of the spectrum.

A considerable number of embodiments and modifications of the invention have been shown and described. It is to be appreciated that further modifications concerning the details of the various embodiments may be made by those skilled in the art. All such modifications come within the spirit and teachings of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A cigarette including a sleeve and a cylinder containing tobacco comprising in combination, a first control element rigidly mounted at one end of said cylinder and having a diameter substantially the same as that of said cylinder, said sleeve fitting over said one end of said cylinder and being rotationally and axially independently movable thereon, and a second control element rigidly mounted in said sleeve and having a diameter substantially the same as that of said sleeve, said control elements having complementary openings therein which are arranged in coincidence or occlusion upon rotation of said sleeve, aeration means in said cylinder in at least one discrete region axially displaced a predetermined distance from said one end of said cylinder, and aeration means in at least one region of said sleeve axially displaced a predetermined distance from said second control element, said respective regions being brought into coincidence by rotational and axial positioning of the sleeve relative to the cylinder.

2. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said first control element includes a filter material.

3. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said control elements are perforated planar surfaces arranged in parallel planes.

4. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said control elements are planar surfaces having openings in alternate arcuate sectors.

5. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said control elements are cones of similar angularity, with alternate sectors of said cones being perforated.

6. A cigarette according to claim 5, in which said respective regions being radially positioned to be in coincidence when rotation of said sleeve places the perforations in said cones in occlusion, said first control element comprising a cone of shorter axial length than that of said second control element, whereby a circumferential cavity is formed when said cones are positioned in nesting relationship due to the axial positioning of said sleeve.

7. A cigarete according to claim 1, wherein said regions are radially positioned to be in coincidence when rotation of said sleeve places the openings in said control elements in occlusion.

8. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said control elements have peripheral openings in substantial axial alignment with said aeration means.

9. A cigarette according to claim 8, wherein said peripheral openings are notches on the perimeter of said control elements.

10. A cigarette according to claim 8, wherein said peripheral openings are arcuate slots near the perimeter of said control elements.

11. A cigarette according to claim 1, wherein said sleeve, said first control element, and said second control element are cylinders adapted to fit within each other respectively, a surface is recessed within the cylinder of said first control element and has said openings therein, and a surface is on the internal end of said second control element and has said openings therein, the outer end of said second control element being afiixed to said sleeve.

12. A cigarette according to claim 11, wherein the sleeve and second control element have coincident aeration means in at least one region, and said first control element has aeration means in at least one region, the respective regions being displaced to effect coincidence when the openings of said first and second control elements are in occlusion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,594,341 8/1926 Alland.

2,705,013 3/1955 Brothers 13l10.5 X 2,923,647 2/1960 Aghnides.

2,954,035 9/1960 Saffir 131--10.3 3,376,874 4/1968 Kim et al. l3110.3 X 3,428,050 2/1969 Kandel 13110.3

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,117,343 11/1961 Germany.

SAMUEL KOREN, Primary Examiner J. H. CZERWONKY, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification131/336, 131/198.2, 131/338
International ClassificationA24D3/04, A24D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24D3/041
European ClassificationA24D3/04A