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Publication numberUS3491196 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date20 Jan 1970
Filing date17 May 1967
Priority date17 May 1967
Publication numberUS 3491196 A, US 3491196A, US-A-3491196, US3491196 A, US3491196A
InventorsStein Age
Original AssigneeStein Age
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Selective-matching educational device
US 3491196 A
Images(2)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 20, 1970 STEIN 3,491,196

SELECTIVE-MATCHING EDUCATIONAL DEVICE Filed May 17, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1' N VEN TOR BY m M ATTOE/VFY Jan. 20, 1970 A. STEIN 3,491,196

SELECTIVE-MATCHING EDUCATIONAL DEVICE Filed May 17, 1967 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VENTOR. 146E 57'6/A/ A rive/v5 V United States Patent 3,491,196 SELECTIVE-MATCHING EDUCATIONAL DEVICE Age Stein, 22528 72nd Place W.,

Edmonds, Wash. 98020 Filed May 17, 1967, Ser. No. 639,159 Int. Cl. A63h 33/04; A63f 9/08 U.S. CI. 35-71 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A principal object is to provide a support having in it a plurality of semblative sockets which will accept respectively congruent semblative inserts having meandering edges, but which sockets will not accept an insert which is incongruent.

A further object is to provide inserts and respectively matching sockets of a type which will enable a considerable number of inserts and sockets to be semblative without being congruent.

Another object is to provide fiat inserts which can be fitted into congruent sockets in a support so that the outer surface of each insert will be flush with the surface of the support bounding the socket, while enabling the insert to be removed readily from the support socket.

It is also an object to provide types of margins which can be adapted to various types of basic profiles.

Another object is to provide inserts and sockets which can be used conveniently with a large variety of matching types of indicia.

Still a further object is to provide such a selectivematching educational device in which the only key to proper assembly congruent inserts and sockets is the matching of corresponding but different indicia, or in which an additional key of matching similar or identical indicia can be provided.

FIGURE 1 is a plan of a support bearing indicia and a plurality of sockets in which congruent inserts have been fitted. FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary plan on an enlarged scale of a portion of the device shown in FIGURE 1, with parts broken away, FIGURE 3 is a plan of an insert on an enlarged scale of a type shown in FIGURE 1. FIGURES 4 and 5 are enlarged fragmentary plans of different portions of the device shown in FIGURE 1, with parts in different relationships. FIGURE 6 is a ton perspective of portions of the device shown in FIGURE 1 on an enlarged scale and disposed in exploded relationship.

FIGURE 7 is a plan of a different type of device utilizing the present invention.

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary plan of another device employing the present invention, and FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary plan of still a different device utilizing the invention.

FIGURES 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 are plans of inserts of difierent types and profiles in accordance with the present invention.

The main concept of this invention is to provide a plurality of sockets on a support and inserts the profiles of which correspond, respectively, to the outlines of such sockets in which at least a portion of the profile of each insert and of the outline of each socket is of meandering shape, each insert profile including an uninter- 3,491,135 Patented Jan. 20, 1970 rupted series of alternate indentations and projections and each socket outline including an uninterrupted series of alternate recesses and protrusions. The profiles of the various inserts and the outlines of the various sockets are so semblative that the inserts cannot be matched with the sockets usually. On the contrary, it is necessary to match indicia on the inserts with indicia on the support to provide the key to congruency of the respective inserts and sockets.

A representative example of an educational device following the principles of the present invention is illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 6. The support 1 in FIGURE 1 is shown as a page of a book which can be made of rather thick material, such as heavy cardboard. Keying indicia to guide selection of inserts to be fitted into congruent sockets on the support is illustrated as the picture 20 of a ball. Such picture affords the key to proper placement of inserts into sockets on the support adjacent to the ball, so as to form the spelling of the matching word BALL. If the person utilizing the device is not aware of the spelling of the word ball he cannot readily select the proper inserts for the respective support sockets.

The inserts 21, 22 and 23 bear the letters B, A and L, forming the composite letters of the representative word BALL. Thus, the insert 21 carries the letter B designated 21a, the insert 22 carries the letter A designated 22a, and each insert 23 carries the letter L designated 23a.

The profile of each of the inserts 21, 22 and 23 has a meandering edge portion including a plurality of angularly offset sides with each side being generally linear but regularly undulating continuously along substantially its entire length and composed of an uninterrupted series of projections and indentations disposed in alternate arrangement. In the particular profiles of the inserts 21, 22 and 23 illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 6 inclusive, each side of the profile of insert 21 has three projections 21b and intervening indentations 210 as indicated in FIGURE 3. Each side of the profile of insert 22 has three projections 22b and intervening indentations 22c as indicated in FIGURE 6. Each side of the profile of insert 23 has three projections 23b and intervening indentations 230 as indicated in FIGURE 1. It will be evident from FIGURE 1 that the inserts 21, 22 and 23 are semblative to the degree that it is very diificult to differentiate these inserts visually one from the other although their profiles are completely unobscured both when each insert is fitted in its socket and when the inserts and sockets are separated. The projections and indentations of the inserts shown in FIGURES 1 to 6 are of the toothed or serrated type, and the inserts themselves are of generally square shape.

The support 1 has a plurality of sockets the outlines of which are respectively congruent with the profile of the several inserts 21, 22 and 23. The outline of each socket has a plurality of angularly offset sides with each side being generally linear but regularly undulating continuously along substantially its entire length and composed of an uninterrupted series of recesses and protrusions disposed in alternate arrangement. Each side of the outlire of socket 22d for the insert 22 is shown in FIGURES 4 and 6 as having three recesses 22e corresponding in shape and location to the projections 22b of the insert 22. Between adiacent recesses of the socket outline are prominences 22 which are adapted to fit into the indent-ations 22c of the insert 22 when the insert is fitted into the socket. Thus, the socket outline, as shown in FIG- URE 6 to best advantage, has three recesses alternating with the intervening prominences.

While only the insert 22 and the socket 22d are shown in detail in FIGURES 1 to 6 inclusive, it will be evident that the sockets for the inserts 21 and 23 will be of the same general character as the socket 22d for the insert 22 except that each socket will be congruent only to its particular insert. This characteristic is illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5. Despite the resemblance in size and profile shape of the several inserts 21, 22 and 23, when an attempt is made to fit the insert 21 into the socket 22d, which is congruent With the insert 22, a marginal portion of the insert 21 will overlap the margin of the support 1 bounding a portion of the outline 22m of the socket 22d as shown in broken lines at the upper left of FIGURE 4, so that the socket 22d will not accept the insert 21. Conversely, as shown in FIGURE 5, when an attempt is made to fit the insert 22 into the socket 21d, which is congruent with the insert 21, a portion of the margin of the insert 22 shown at the upper right of FIGURE 5 will overlap a portion of the margin of the support 1 bounding a portion of the outline 21m of the socket 21d shown in broken lines in that figure. Consequently, such socket will not accept the insert 22 despite the resemblance between the inserts 21 and 22 and their sockets 21d and 22d.

It is desirable for each insert 21, 22 and 23 to fit snugly in its respective socket, and for the upper surface of the insert to be substantially flush with the surface of the support 1 bounding the respective sockets when the inserts have been fitted in their sockets. Consequently, it is desirable to construct the inserts and sockets in a manner which will enable the inserts to be removed easily from their sockets despite the close fit between them. For this purpose, one edge of each insert may be spaced from the corresponding edge of the socket to provide a depression into which a fingernail or a tool can be inserted to pry the insert out of its socket. Thus, for example, each of the inserts 21, 22 and 23 is shown as having a straight edge portion 21g, 22g and 23g, respectively, spaced from a corresponding straight portion 21h, 22h and 23h, respectively, of the sockets for such inserts.

As has been explained previously, because of the close resemblance of the inserts 21, 22 and 23 and their respective sockets, the only elfective key to indicate which insert will be accepted by a particular socket is to know that when the inserts are inserted in their respective sockets, the letters on such inserts will cooperatively spell the word BALL, matching the picture 20 of the ball on the support 1. For someone skilled in spelling, such association between the picture 20 and the word BALL does not present a problem, but to a child who is learning the spelling of the word ball, it may be desirable to provide a further key to the placement of the inserts in the proper sockets. For this purpose, each socket may have in the bottom of it a letter corresponding to the letter on the congruent insert. Thus, the bottom of the socket 22d may carry the letter A corresponding to the letter A 22a on the insert 22. Preferably, such letter in the bottom of a socket is removable so that after a child has become reasonably skilled in spelling, the matching letters in the bottoms of the several recesses can be removed so that reliance must be placed on matching the entire word with the picture 20 on the support 1 in order to be able to place the inserts in their respective sockets without following a trial and error procedure.

FIGURE 6 illustrates a construction by which a letter may be provided temporarily in the bottom of the socket 22d. For this purpose, the insert 22 will be of a thickness slightly less than the full depth of the socket so as to accommodate a relatively thin insert 22i in the bottom of the socket beneath the insert 22. Such lower insert bears the same letter A designated 22 as appears on the insert 22 designated 22a. It would be undesirable for such lower insert to be removed inadvertently when the upper insert 22 is removed from the socket. Consequently, the lower insert has a tong e 22k which fits the notch in the socket formed by the recess wall 22h. When the fingernail or an implement is inserted between the edge portion 22g of the insert 22 and the wall 22h of the socket 22d, therefore, such fingernail or implement will bear on the tongue 22k to slide between the insert 22 and the lower insert 22i for picking out the upper insert without disturbing the lower insert.

In order to be able to remove the thin lower insert 22i readily, an indentation 22l may be provided in the portion of its edge opposite the tongue 22k so that such insert edge portion will be spaced from a recess in the outline of the socket, as shown in FIGURE '2. A fiingernail or an implement can be inserted between the edge portion 22l of the insert 22i and the adjacent portion of the socket wall so that the lower insert can be pried out of the socket when desired. FIGURE 4, as well as FIGURE 2, illustrates the lower insert 22i as being lodged in the bottom of the socket 22d, while FIGURE 6 shows this lower insert as having been removed from such socket. Correspondingly, FIGURE 5 shows the lower insert 22i as being lodged in the bottom of the socket in the support 1, which lower insert bears the letter B designated 21 and has the tongue 21k.

While the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURES 1 to 6 inclusive has inserts bearing letters which cooperate to form a word matching the picture 20 of the object named, the support 1 and inserts can bear matching indicia of different types. Thus, in FIGURE 7, inserts 31 and 41 having profiles of the same general contour as the inserts 21, 22 and 23 shown in FIGURE 1 are illustrated, but in these instances, each insert bears the representation of an object and the support carries the name of the corresponding object at a location adjacent to the socket congruent with the matching insert. Thus, the Word BOAT designated 30 is located adjacent to the socket in the support 1 congruent with the insert 31 which bears the picture 31a of a boat. Such insert has edge projections 31b and alternate indentations 31c complemental to corresponding recesses and prominences in the outline of the congruent socket. One edge portion 31g is spaced from the corresponding portion 31h of the socket wall to provide a depression in which a fingernail or an implement can be inserted to pry the insert 31 out of its socket.

Similarly, the support 1 bears the word CAR designated 40 adjacent to a socket in the support which will accept the insert 41 bearing the representation 41a of a car. Such insert has a meandering edge portion including a plurality of projections 41b and a plurality of indentations 41c disposed in alternating arrangement complemental to corresponding recesses and pro-minences in the socket. Also, one edge portion 41g is spaced from the corresponding wall portion 41h of the socket so that a fingernail or an implement can be inserted between the edge portion 41g and the wall 41h for the purpose of prying the insert out of its socket.

In utilizing the structure shown in FIGURE 7, a person who recognizes the appearance of the word BOAT and distinguishes it from the word CAR will place the insert 31 in its socket without first trying to fit it into a difiFerent socket. If he is able to identify the word car he will similarly place the insert 41 in its socket instead of first trying it in another socket. While the inserts 31 and 41 are obviously semblative, there is sufficient difference between their profiles so that the socket congruent with one of such inserts will not accept the other insert. Similarly, no other socket of the particular series would accept an insert which was not congruent with it, despite the resemblance between the insert congruent with that socket and all of the other inserts of the particular series.

While in FIGURES 1 to 7 the indicia has been shown as correlating pictures of objects with names of objects,

such insert and socket structure can be utilized for establishing associations of other types of indicia. In

FIGURE 8, for example, the correlation between an arithmetic problem 50 and its answer is illustrated. In this case, the insert 51 bears a number 51a which represents the answer to the arithmetic problem. Such insert, like the inserts shown in FIGURES 1 to 7, is of generally square shape and has an undulating profile portion including a plurality of projections 51b and a plurality of indentations 51c disposed in alternate arrangement. Again, the configuration of the insert profile would be such that a different socket adjacent to another arithrnetic problem to which the indicia 51a was not the answer, would not accept the insert 51. An edge portion 51g of the insert is spaced from a corresponding wall portion 5111 of the socket so that a fingernail or an implement could be inserted between such insert edge portion and socket wall portion to enable the insert to be pried out.

The present educational device may also be used for the purpose of testing a persons memory. In FIGURE 9, an embodiment is shown in which the support 1 bears only the numbers 1 and 2 designated 60 and 70, adjacent to sockets. Such numbers correspond to items in a series, such as the names of successive presidents of the United States. Alternatively, such inserts might simply bear letters of the alphabet arranged in numerical sequence. In the illustration shown, the insert 61 congruent with the socket adjacent to the numeral 1 bears the name WASHINGTON designated 61a, which is the name of the first president of the United States. In this instance, the insert is of generally rectangular shape, rather than being of generally square shape, as are the inserts in FIGURES l to 8, but again, at least a portion of the insert profile is of meandering character, including a plurality of projections 61b and a plurality of indentations 61c arranged alternately. Also, an edge portion 61g of the insert is spaced from a corresponding wall portion 61h of the socket so as to provide a depression into which a fingernail or implement can be inserted to pry the insert 61 out of its socket.

Insert 71, adjacent to the numeral 2, bears the word ADAMS designated 71a, which is the name of the second president of the United States. Despite the resemblance between the profiles of insert 61 and insert 71, the projections 71b and indentations 710 of insert 71 will be sutficiently different, at least in some respects, so that the socket adjacent to numeral 60 will not accept insert 71 or any other insert of the series, and the socket adjacent to numeral 70 will not accept insert 61 or any other insert of the series, with the exception of the particular insert congruent with the respective socket in each instance. Also, a portion 71g of the edge of insert 71 will be spaced from a corresponding wall portion 71h of the socket in which the insert 71 fits so that such insert can be pried out of its socket by a fingernail or an implement inserted in the depression between such edge portion and socket wall portion.

While the general profile of the inserts shown in FIG- URES 1 to '8 is square and the general profile of the inserts shown in FIGURE 9 is rectangular, it is not necessary that the inserts and their sockets have such general profiles. Thus, the insert 81 of FIGURE 10 has a generally circular profile, and the insert 82 of FIGURE 11 has a generally triangular profile. In both cases, however, as in the case of the inserts shown in FIG-URES l to '9, the meandering profile contour is of zigzag or serrated formation. Thus, the generally, circular profile of the insert 81 shown in FIGURE 10 includes a plurality of projections 81b and a plurality of indentations 81c disposed in alternate arrangement. Similarly, the generally triangular profile of the insert 82 shown in FIGURE 11 includes a plurality of projections 82b and a plurality of indentations 82c arranged alternately. Also, an edge portion 81g of the insert 81 of FIGURE 10 would be spaced from the corresponding wall portion 81h of a socket in which insert 81 was lodged. Similarly, an edge portion 82g of the insert 82 in FIGURE 11 would be spaced from a corresponding wall portion 82h of a socket otherwise congruent with the insert 82.

Whatever general profile shape an insert may have, the particular meandering character of a portion of its edge may differ completely or partially. Thus, while the meandering or uneven profile of the inserts shown in FIGURES l to 11 are of the serrated or zigzag toothed type, the insert 83 has an edge portion of wavy or serpentine character, including a plurality of rounded projections 83b and a plurality of concave indentations 83c disposed in alternate arrangement.

In FIGURE 13, an edge portion of toothed contour has projections 84b and indentations 84c of substantially square-toothed shape. In FIGURE 14, the insert has a perforated edge portion including a plurality of peaked projections 85b and a plurality of concave indentations 85c disposed in alternate arrangement. In FIGURE 15, the insert 86 has a meandering or uneven edge portion in the form of scallops, including a plurality of convex projections 86b and a plurality of cusp indentations 86c disposed in alternate arrangement.

For purposes of illustration, the inserts shown in FIG- URES 10 to 15 inclusive, designated 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 and 86, respectively, are shown as bearing the same indica in the form of an A designated 81a, 82a, 83a, 84a, 85a and 86a, respectively. For different adaptations, the indicia would vary, depending upon the particular type of educational device in which such inserts are used. Also, the several inserts are shown as having straight edge portions 81g, 82g, 83g, 84g, 85g and 86g, respectively, spaced from corresponding wall portions 81h, 82h, 83h, 84h, 85h and 86h, respectively, of sockets in which the inserts can be fitted. Further, it will be evident that the basic shape of the insert in the form of a polygon or a figure having basically a curved profile, such as a circle or an ellipse, can have a meandering or uneven profile portion varying in contour, varying in extent, or having combinations of various species of uneven contour, such as toothed, serpentine, perforated or scalloped. In each case, however, it is important that the various inserts of a set be semblative and that there be only one socket with which only a particular selected insert is congruent.

I claim:

1. An educational device comprising supporting means having a plurality of semblative but incongruent sockets, and a plurality of separate semblative but incongruent inserts, said inserts having profiles congruent with the outlines of different respective ones of said sockets, both the profile of each insert and the outline of each pocket being unobscured both when each insert is fitted in its socket and when said inserts and sockets are separated, the profile of each insert and the outline of each socket including a plurality of angularly offset sides with each side being generally linear but regularly undulating continuously along substantially its entire length, each said undulating insert profile side being composed of an uninterrupted series of projections and indentations disposed in alternate arrangement including at least three projections and each said undulating socket outline side being composed of an uninterrupted series of recesses and protrusions disposed in alternate arrangement and including at least three recesses, said outlines recesses and protrusions of each of said sockets being complemental to the corresponding profile projections and indentati ns of the respective insert congruent with each such socket, said incongruent inserts bearing different indicia respectively, which indicia are of a character such that indicia on different inserts are mutually correlated when said inserts are fitted into their respectively congruent sockets.

2. The educational device defined in claim 1, in which the projections and indentations of the insert sides and the recesses and protrusions of the socket side are perforated.

3. The educational device as defined in claim 1, in which the projections and indentations of the insert sides and the recesses and protrusions of the socket sides are scalloped.

4. The educational device defined in claim 1, in which the profile of each insert is of a shape such that any selected insert will be accepted in flush relationship to the rim only of a socket incongruent with it.

5. The educational device defined in claim 1, in which the inserts are of generally triangular profile, and the sockets have generally triangular outlines.

6. An educational device comprising supporting means having a plurality of semblative but incongruent sockets, and a plurality of separate semblative but incongruent inserts, said inserts having profiles congruent with the outlines of different respective ones of said sockets, both the profile of each insert and the outline of each socket being unobscured both when each insert is fitted in its socket and when said inserts and sockets are separated, the profile of each insert and the outline of each socket including a plurality of angularly offset sides with each side being generally linear but regularly undulating continuously along substantially its entire length, each said undulating insert profile side being composed of an uninterrupted series of projections and indentations disposed in alternate arrangement including at least three projections and each said undulating socket outline side being composed of an uninterrupted series of recesses and protrusions disopsed in alternate arrangement and including at least three recesses,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,085,405 1/1914 Dadd 71 1,624,450 4/ 1927 Vershbinsky. 1,735,456 11/1929 Garrnan 35--71 1,946,318 2/1934 Hamilton. 2,900,742 8/ 1959 Barker 'et a1. 3,212,201 10/1965 Jensen.

FOREIGN PATENTS 997,145 7/ 1965 Great Britain.

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner WILLIAM H. GRI=EB, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 35-70; 273-156 @733 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 1,1 Dated January 20 1970 Inventor(s) Age Stein It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

r Column 6 line 49 change "pocket" to --socketline 62 change "outlines" to -out1ine-- line 72 change "side" to --sides--.

line 6 delete "incongruent" and insert "con- Column 7, gruent--,

SIBNED 559,) SEALED 25m '& ;;5 ;m,1,n|w, h

(SEAL) t: E. a I Edward M. Fletcher, Jr. Oomissionar at M Awaiting Officer

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US1624450 *7 Jun 192612 Apr 1927David VershbinskyEducational appliance
US1735456 *30 Jan 192912 Nov 1929Garman Raymond HEducational device
US1946318 *10 Apr 19316 Feb 1934Hamilton Eugene BEducational game device
US2900742 *5 Apr 195625 Aug 1959Barker Lylliard BEducational game for teaching spelling
US3212201 *28 Jun 196319 Oct 1965Cornelius JensenQuestion and answer game for the school and home
GB997145A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3827774 *6 Dec 19726 Aug 1974Quaker Oats CoToy desk
US4003144 *11 Jul 197518 Jan 1977Damon CorporationEducational block with replaceable chip
US4294469 *6 Aug 197913 Oct 1981Errichiello DBook binders and books made with said binders
US4315642 *6 Aug 197916 Feb 1982Errichiello DIntegrally molded covers and spines for looseleaf books
US5542849 *18 Jan 19956 Aug 1996Douglass; Milo R.System for self-typing of individual essences
US5653471 *4 Jun 19965 Aug 1997R.R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyNested book assembly
US5683112 *2 Apr 19964 Nov 1997R. R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyPuzzle book
US5810536 *14 Jul 199722 Sep 1998R.R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyMethod of forming a puzzle book
US5857706 *25 Sep 199712 Jan 1999R. R. Donnelley & Sons CompanyPuzzle book
US6227863 *18 Feb 19988 May 2001Donald SpectorPhonics training computer system for teaching spelling and reading
US67025866 Dec 20029 Mar 2004Sharmac Designs LlcTeaching puzzle
US714064328 May 200428 Nov 2006Smith Mildred PApparatus and method for teaching early learning skills
US82020945 Nov 200419 Jun 2012Radmila Solutions, L.L.C.System and method for training users with audible answers to spoken questions
WO1981000348A1 *6 Aug 198019 Feb 1981Errichiello DIntegrally molded covers and spines for looseleaf books
WO1981000378A1 *6 Aug 198019 Feb 1981Errichiello DBook binders and books made with said binders
WO1997036755A1 *11 Mar 19979 Oct 1997Donnelley & Sons CoPuzzle book
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/345, 273/156, 40/537, 434/167
International ClassificationA63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0098
European ClassificationA63F9/00W