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Publication numberUS3308615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date14 Mar 1967
Filing date10 Mar 1965
Priority date10 Mar 1965
Publication numberUS 3308615 A, US 3308615A, US-A-3308615, US3308615 A, US3308615A
InventorsSusskind John W, Susskind William B
Original AssigneeClifton Yarn Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stretch novelty yarn and method of making same
US 3308615 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1967 v J. w. SUSSKIND ETAL 3,308,615

STRETCH NOVELTY YARN AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed March 10, 1965 a Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 1 A 1 7a z I N VEN TORS Juli/2 [isms/Wild & mliiamfiim'li'iiyai ATTORNEYS- Mgrch14, 1967 J. w. SUSSKIND ETAL 3,308,615

STRETCH NOVELTY YARN AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed March 10, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG; 4

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STRETCH NOVELTY YARN AND METHOQ OF MAKING SAME Filed March 10, 1965 5 sheets-sheet 5 FIG. 7

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United States Patent 3,308,615 STRETCH NOVELTY YARN AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME John W. Susskind, Narberth, and William B. Susskind,

Wynnewood, Pa., assignors to Clifton Yarn Mills, Inc.,

Clifton Heights, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 10, 1965, Set. No. 438,481 17 Claims. (Cl. 57-144) This invention relates generally to yarns, and particularly to new stretch novelty yarns, to methods of producing the same, and to fabrics made of such yarns.

An important object of the invention is to combine a plurality of spun or filament yarns, of natural, vegetable, or man-made fiber, with an elastic thread or threads to produce a new composite novelty yarn which may be used in making or decorating fabrics knitted by hand or machine, woven, or otherwise produced.

Another object is to provide such a composite yarn characterized by an effect thread wrapped about a core thread so as to form along the length of the core thread node-like formations arranged generally in accordance with a predetermined pattern which gives the desired novelty effect.

Another object is to provide such a composite yarn in which the core and effect threads thus combined are in turn wrapped about the elastic thread so that when the composite thread is permitted to relax the combination of core and effect threads form randomly along the length of the elastic thread relatively prominent nodelike loops extending randomly from the elastic thread in all directions.

Another object is to provide such a novelty yarn which substantially retains its characteristic appearance when stretched.

Another object is to provide such a novelty yarn in which the elastic thread functions to secure the effect thread against displacement longitudinally of the core thread and to thereby substantially fix the desired novelty effect.

Another object is to provide a method for producing such yarn whereby first a given length of the core thread is wrapped with a greater length of the effect thread and then a given length of suitably tensioned elastic thread is wrapped with a greater length of the combined core and effect threads.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent when the following description is read with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic view of apparatus that may be used to combine the non-elastic core and effect threads in a first operation in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a schematic view of apparatus that may be used to combine the elastic thread with the non-elastic core and effect threads in a second operation in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 3 is a view showing a stretch nub yarn made in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 4 is a view of the combined non-elastic core and effect threads resulting from the initial operation, shown in FIGURE 1, in the production of the stretch nub yarn of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a view of the yarn illustrated in FIG- URE 3, but in fully elongated condition;

FIGURE 6 is a view showing a stretch worsted ratine yarn made in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 7 is a view of the combined non-elastic core and effect threads resulting from the initial operation in the production of the stretch worsted ratine yarn of FIGURE 6; and

3,308,615 Patented Mar. 14, 1967 ice FIGURE 8 is a view of the yarn illustrated in FIG- URE 6, but in fully elongated condtion.

The following description is directed to the specific forms of the yarn illustrated in the drawings, and to the described methods of producing the same. It is not intended to be addressed to the scope of the invention, which may be practiced in a variety of forms.

Referring to FIGURE 1, in a first operation, a core thread 10 is passed downwardly through the nip of a pair of rolls 12, a pigtail guide 14 and a traveler 16 on the ring 18. From the traveler 16 it passes to a bobbin 20 on a rotating spindle 22. In addition, an effect thread 24 is passed horizontally through the nip of a pair of rolls 26, over a guide 28 and downwardly with the core thread 10 through the pigtail guide 14 and the traveler 16 to the bobbin 20.

The core thread may be two ends of SO-lea linen positively fed through the nip of the rolls 12. The effect thread may be one end of 300 denier, 44 filament dull rayon positively fed through the nip of the rolls 26. For each 10.3 inches of the core thread 10 fed by the rolls 12, 17 inches of the effect thread 24 are fed by the rolls 26.

The bobbin 20 rotates at a predetermined rate, and as it rotates the core thread 10 and the effect thread 24 are twisted together. After the twisting action, the two threads will be intertwined so that the core thread 10 will take up resistance to lengthwise pull to prevent damage to the effect thread 24.

Referring particularly to FIGURE 4, which shows the combination of core and effect threads wound on the bobbin 20, the effect thread 24 wraps about the core thread 10 with rather tight long-pitch turns, as at 30, rather tight small-pitch turns forming nubs, as at 32 and 33, and loose long-pitch turns forming node-like loops, as at 34. The node-like formations, i.e., the nubs and node-like loops, are arranged along the length of the core thread approximately in accordance with a predetermined pattern, and the node-like loops extend randomly from the core thread in all directions. The pattern aforesaid consists of repeats of a predetermined arrangement of nubs and node-like loops formed by interrupting or varying the delivery ratios of the rolls 12 and 26 in a predetermined manner or by other means well known to the novelty yarn art.

Now referring to FIGURE 2, in a second operation, an elastic thread 36 is passed downwardly through the nip of a pair of rolls 38, a pigtail guide 39 and a traveler 40 on a ring 42. From the traveler 40 it passes to a bobbin 44 on a rotating spindle 46. In addition, the combination of core and effect threads is passed horizontally through the nip of a pair of rolls 48, over a guide 50 and downwardly with the elastic thread 36 through the pigtail guide 39 and the traveler 40 to the bobbin 44.

The elastic thread 36 may be one end of denier, monofilament, zero twist spandex positively fed at a uniform rate through the nip of the rolls 38. Between the rolls 38 and the bobbin 44 the spandex thread is suitably tensioned, and for each 6.7 inches of spandex thread (measured while suitably tensioned) fed at a uniform rate by the rolls 38, 10.3 inches of the combination of core and effect threads are fed at a uniform rate by the rolls 48. The bobbin 44 rotates at a predetermined rate, and as it rotates, the combination of core and effect threads and the spandex thread are twisted together. After the twisting action, the combination of core and effect threads and the spandex thread will be intertwined so that the core thread will take up resistance to lengthwise pull to prevent damage to the spandex thread, as well as to the effect thread. The direction of twist for this second operation is opposite to the direction of twist for the first operation.

Referring particularly to FIGURE 3, which shows the finished composite yarn, the combination of core and effect threads wraps about the relaxed spandex thread in such a way as to form node-like loops 52 and 54, the latter of which curl upon themselves, as shown. The node-like loops 52 and 54 are formed randomly along the length of the spandex thread and extend randomly from the spandex thread in all directions. In the finished composite yarn, the core, effect and binder threads constitute 50.39%, 41.91% and 7.7%, respectively, of the total yarn weight.

Now referring to FIGURE 5, which shows the yarn of FIGURE 3 stretched to the full capacity of the core thread, it will be noted that the combination of core and effect threads retains its novel appearance when the composite yarn is stretched. This is largely due to the action of the spandex thread 36, which acts to fix the effect thread 24 in position longitudinally of the core thread during elongation and contraction of the composite yarn.

Referring to FIGURE 7, which illustrates thecombined non-elastic core and effect threads resulting from the initial operation in the production of the stretch worsted ratine yarn of FIGURE 6, the effect thread '56 wraps about the core thread 58 with rather tight longpitch turns forming node-like loops, as at 60, and loose long'pitch turns forming node-like loops, as at 62, some of which curl upon themselves, as at 64. The node-like loops are arranged along the length of the core thread approximately in accordance with a predetermined pattern and extend randomly from the core thread in all directions. The pattern aforesaid consists of repeats of a predetermined arrangement of tight and loose, loop forming turns of the effect yarn.

Referring particularly to FIGURE 6, the combination of core and effect threads wraps about the relaxed spandex thread 66 with rather tight long-pitch turns, as at 68, and

'with long-pitch turns forming node-like loops 70 and 72,

the latter of which curl upon themselves, as shown. The node-like loops 70 and 72 are formed randomly along the length of the spandex thread and extend randomlyfrom the spandex thread in all directions.

The core thread may be one end of 30s worsted and one end of 70 denier nylon positively fed through the nip of the rolls 12. The effect thread may be one end of 23s worsted positively fed through the nip of the rolls 26. For each 10.25 inches of the core thread fed by the rolls 12, 20.5 inches of the effect thread are fed by the rolls 26. The elastic yarn may be one end of 70 denier spandex positively fed at a uniform rate through the nip of the rolls 38. For each 4.75 inches of spandex thread (measured while suitably tensioned) fed by the rolls 38, 10.25 inches of the combination of core and effect yarns are fed at a uniform rate through the nip of the rolls 48. In the finished composite yarn, the worsted, nylon and spandex materials constitute 90.35%, 6.61% and 3.04%, respectively, of the total yarn weight.

During the initial operation, the core and effect threads are twisted together in one direction so that the effect thread spirals about the core thread. During the final operation, the combination of core and effect threads and the spandex thread are twisted together in the opposite direction, which tends to untwist the combination of core and effect threads, whereby to make it fuller and more open.

Referring to FIGURE 8, which shows the composite yarn of FIGURE 6 stretched to the full capacity of the core thread, it will be noted that the combination of core and effect threads retains its novel appearance when it is stretched. Again, this is largely due to the action of the spandex thread, which acts as a binder to fix the effect thread in position longitudinally of the core thread during elongation and contraction of the composite yarn.

It will be understood that it is not intended to be limited to composite yarns made of threads having the specific number of ends and made of the specific materials shown and described. Any one of the threads may have a different number of ends and/or may be made of different materials.

While the elastic thread of the composite yarns shown and described is spandex, e.g., those sold under the tradenames Lycra or Vyrene, it is not intended to be limited to this material for other materials may be employed with good results, for example, rubber (covered or uncovered), stretch nylon, etc. When the elastic thread is spandex, the desired elasticity is not realized until the yarn is subjected to a suitable wet heat treatment. Any wet heat treatment which effects shrinkage is appropriate, for ex ample, scouring, dyeing, etc. The wet treatment may be administered to yarn in the form of skeins of banks thereof, or to the yarn after it is woven or knit into a fabric. It will be noted that While composite yarns with spandex presently require a wet heat treatment to develop the desired elasticity, other materials may require different treatment, and in some instances no special treatment at all.

It will be understood that the embodiments of the composite yarn shown and described are merely exemplary, and that numerous variations are possible. For exam le, short nubs consisting of a few turns of the effect thread may be replaced by comparatively long slubs of many turns of the effect thread. Single node-like loops may be replaced by double node-like loops. In addition, the nubs, slubs and single and double node-like loops which may be present in one repeat of the effect thread may be an ranged in any desired order to create the characteristic desired novelty effect. Almost any desired novelty effect may be obtained by one expedient or another known to the novelty yarn art. In addition, the final resulting yarn effect will be affected by the amount of tension applied to the elastic binder yarn during the manufacture of the composite yarn.

What is claimed is:

1. A composite stretch novelty yarn comprising a taut, straight non-elastic core thread, an untensioned non-alas tic thread wrapped about said core thread in one direction, slidable therealong and bulging outwardly therefrom in a. series of node-like formations that produce the charac'' teristic novelty effect, and an initially stretched elastic thread twisted in the opposite direction with said combined non-elastic threads to form the finished composite yarn, said elastic thread being operative to bind said cf fect thread to said core thread and secure the same against sliding therealong, said combined non-elastis; threads being adapted to bulge outwardly in a series of node-like loops when said composite yarn is permitted to relax.

2. The yarn of claim 1 wherein the characteristic novelty effect is produced by arrangement of the effect thread to form groups of node-like formations, each group being arranged approximately in accordance with a pre determined pattern and forming a repeat in a continuous series thereof extending the length of the core thread.-

3. The yarn of claim 1 wherein a given length of the non-elastic effect thread is greater than the length or non-' elastic core thread about which it is wrapped, and a given length of the combined non-elastic threads is greater than the relaxed length of the elastic thread with which it is twisted.

4. A composite stretch novelty yarn comprising a nonelastic efiect thread wrapped about a non-elastic core thread in one direction so that the average diameter of wraps is substantially larger than the diameter of the portion of the core thread within the wraps, and an elastic thread twisted with the combined non-elastic threads in the opposite direction, said effect thread being held about said core thread and secured against sliding therealong solely by the intertwist of said combined non-elastic threads and said elastic thread, and said combined nonelastic threads and said elastic thread being so arranged that when the composite yarn is elongated said. combined non-elastic threads and said elastic thread are arrangedin a tight ply formation, and when the composite yarn is permitted to contract said combined non-elastic threads bulge outwardly from said elastic thread.

5. The yarn of claim 4 wherein a given length of the non-elastic effect thread is greater by a predetermined amount than the length of non elastic core thread about which it is wrapped, and a given length of the combined non-elastic threads is greater by a predetermined amount than the relaxed length of the elastic thread with which it is twisted.

6. The yarn of claim 5 wherein each of the core, effeet and elastic threads is free of adhesion to the others.

7. The yarn of claim 6 wherein the core thread consists of two ends of 50-1ea linen, the effect thread is one end of 300 denier rayon, the elastic thread is one end of 140 denier spandex, and the core, effect and elastic threads constitute approximately 50.39%, 41.91% and 7.70%, respectively, of the weight of the composite yarn.

8. The yarn of claim 6 wherein the core thread consists of one end of 30s worsted and one end of 70 denier nylon, the effect thread is one end of 23s worsted, the elastic thread is one end of 70 denier spandex, and the worsted, nylon and spandex materials constitute approximately 90.35%, 6.61% and 3.04%, respectively, of the weight of the composite yarn.

9. A composite stretch novelty yarn comprising a nonelastic effect thread wrapped about a core thread so that the average diameter of wraps is substantially larger than the diameter of the portion of the core thread within the wraps, and an elastic thread twisted with the combined effect and core threads, said effect thread being held about said core thread and secured against sliding therealong solely by the intertwist of said combined effect and core threads and said elastic thread, and said combined effect and core threads and said elastic thread being so arranged that when the composite yarn is elongated said combined effect and core threads and said elastic thread are arranged in a tight ply formation, and when the composite yarn is ermitted to contract said effect and core threads bulge outwardly from said elastic thread.

10. A method of producing composite stretch novelty yarns which comprises advancing a non-elastic core thread into a twist zone, advancing a non-elastic effect thread into said twist zone and wrapping the same about said core thread in one direction so that the average diameter of wrap is substantially larger than the diameter of the portion of said core thread within the wraps, advancing the combined non-elastic threads into a second twist zone, and advancing a tensioned elastic thread into said second twist zone and twisting it with the combined non-elastic threads in the opposite direction so that the effect thread will be held about said core thread and secured against sliding therealong solely by the intertwist of said combined non-elastic threads and said elastic thread, so that when said composite yarn is elongated said combined non-elastic threads and said elastic thread are arranged in tight ply formation, and so that when said composite yarn is permitted to relax said combined nonelastic threads bulge outwardly from said elastic thread.

11. The method of claim 10 wherein the non-elastic core thread is positively fed into said first twist zone, the non-elastic effect thread is positively fed into said first twist zone at a higher rate than said core thread, the tensioned elastic thread is positively fed into the second twist zone, and the combined non-elastic threads are fed into said second zone at a higher rate than said tensioned elastic thread.

12. A method of producing composite stretch novelty yarns which comprises in a first operation passing a nonelastic core thread through the nip of a first pair of feed rolls into a first twist zone between said first pair of feed rolls and the traveler of a first twister, passing a non-elastic effect thread through the nip of a second pair of feed rolls into said first twist zone and wrapping the same about said core thread in one direction in a sinuous, irregularly gathered path, in a second operation passing an elastic thread through the nip of a third pair of feed rolls, passing the combined non-elastic threads through the nip of a fourth pair of feed rolls and twisting it with the combined non-elastic threads in the opposite direction so that when said composite yarn is elongated said combined non-elastic threads and said elastic thread are arranged in tight ply formation, and so that when said composite yarn is permitted to relax said combined nonelastic threads bulge outwardly from said elastic thread.

13. The method of claim 10 wherein the core thread consists of two ends of 50-lea linen, the effect thread is one end of 300 denier rayon, the elastic thread is one end of 140 denier spandex, and the core, effect and elastic threads constitute approximately 50.39%, 41.91% and 7.70%, respectively, of the weight of the composite yarn.

14. The method of claim 10 wherein the core thread consists of one end of 30s worsted and one end of denier nylon, the effect thread is one end of 23s worsted, the elastic thread is one end of 70 denier spandex, and the worsted, nylon and spandex materials constitute approximately 90.35%, 6.61% and 3.04%, respectively, of the weight of the composite yarn.

15. The method of claim 10 wherein the yarn is subjected to a wet heat treatment for a period of time sufficient to develop elasticity.

16. A method of producing composite stretch novelty yarns which comprises advancing a core thread into a twist zone, advancing a non-elastic effect thread into said twist zone and wrapping the same about said core thread so that the average diameter of wrap is substantially larger than the diameter of the portion of said core thread within the wraps, advancing the combined core and effect threads into a second twist zone, and advancing a tensioned elastic thread into said second twist zone and twisting it with the combined core and effect threads so that the effect thread will be held about said core thread and secured against sliding therealong solely by the intertwist of said combined core and effect threads and said elastic thread, so that when said composite yarn is elongated said combined core and effect threads and said elastic thread are arranged in tight ply formation, and so that when said composite yarn is permitted to relax said combined core and effect threads bulge outwardly from said elastic thread.

17. A fabric comprising a composite stretch novelty yarn in accordance with claim 4.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,211,643 8/1940 Bry 57144 2,324,989 7/1943 Alderfer 57152 2,731,789 1/1956 Holder 57-160 3,264,816 8/1966 Jaggi 57-160 FRANK J. COHEN, Primary Examiner. JOHN PETRAKES, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2211643 *24 Nov 193913 Aug 1940Edwin & Louis Bry IncNovelty wool and mohair knop yarn
US2324989 *4 Dec 194020 Jul 1943Firestone Tire & Rubber CoElastic novelty yarn
US2731789 *4 Mar 195324 Jan 1956 holder
US3264816 *21 Jun 19639 Aug 1966Heberlein Patent CorpProcess for producing composite yarn structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3487628 *30 Sep 19666 Jan 1970Du PontCore-spun yarns,fabrics and process for the preparation thereof
US4202161 *22 Jan 197913 May 1980Tuscarora Yarns, Inc.Apparatus for producing novelty yarn
US4528809 *29 Oct 198016 Jul 1985Textured Yarn Company, Inc.Loop chenille type yarn
US4662164 *26 Dec 19855 May 1987Burlington Industries, Inc.Separation, and phasing of sheath sliver around a core
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/207, 57/12, 57/6, 57/225
International ClassificationD01H5/00, D01H5/36
Cooperative ClassificationD01H5/36
European ClassificationD01H5/36