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Publication numberUS3172376 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date9 Mar 1965
Filing date30 Nov 1962
Priority date30 Nov 1962
Publication numberUS 3172376 A, US 3172376A, US-A-3172376, US3172376 A, US3172376A
InventorsHavlis Adolph J
Original AssigneeHavlis Adolph J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display rack
US 3172376 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 9, 1965 A. J. HAVLIS DISPLAY RACK Filed Nov. 30, 1962 ATT INVENTOR ADOLPH J. HAVLIS United States Patent 3,172,376 DESPLAY RACK Adolph l Havlis, Williams Bay, Wis. Filed Nov. 31), 1%2, Ser. No. 241,404 6 Claims. (Cl. Hid-59) This invention relates to a new and improved display rack, and has for its principal object the provision of simpler and more economical, andyet far better, shelf supports than have been obtainable, the rack of my invention having coaXially aligned inturned end portions on the opposite ends of a plurality of horizontal rods which are easily insertable for pivotal mounting in vertically spaced holes provided in but not extending through the downwardly diverging legs of the tubular side frame embers of the rack, the legs being sprung toward each other to permit entry of these inturned ends in these holes and then spread apart to retain the same in said holes, a single bottom rod of generally similar form but having the coaxially aligned inturned ends somewhat longer than the first mentioned ones and threaded and extending all the way through the legs and having nuts threaded thereon to draw the legs together and complete the assembly. The advantages of this construction, aside from the simplicity and economy of construction already mentioned, are:

(1) There is no damage to the bright galvanized and lacquered finish of the tubing used in the side frame members as would follow from a welding operation, for example, and, therefore, the cost of an extra plating and polishing operation is saved, and a better looking display rack is the result since the tubing retains its original finish and luster;

(2) Whatever amount of projection of the shelves both from the front and from the rear of the rack is desired is easily provided for by corresponding elongation of the end portions including these inturned ends, merchandisers being eager to have the articles displayed as conspicuously on the shelves as possible, and this objective being so easily and nicely achieved with the present construction, and

(3) The present construction is sturdy enuoght so that no diagonally extending braces are required on either side nor even on the back of the rack, thereby leaving the merchandise on all of the shelves more easily accessible from all sides of the rack.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a display rack made in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective showing a typical slip-in pivotal connection for both of the inturned ends of the shelf supporting rods for all but the bottom shelf; and

FIG. 3 is a similar perspective showing the related form of connection used for both ends of the rods for the bottom shelf.

The same reference numerals are applied to corresponding parts in these three views.

Referring to the drawing, the reference numeral 4 designates the display rack of my invention generally, the same comprising inverted generally U-shaped tubular side frame members 5 and 6 that are interconnected near the top and bottom at the back by a pair of horizontal tubular cross-pieces 7 and 8 having downwardly bent ends 9 secured to the inner side of the rear legs 10 of the side frame members by means of screws 11 entered through registering holes in the abutting parts and having wing nuts 12 threaded on their inner end portions. The frame thus provided serves to support a plurality of horizontal shelves 13-16 disposed in vertically spaced rela- "ice tion between the side frame members. Each of these shelves, which are all preferably made of sheet metal with upwardly bent front, back and side walls, as indicated at 17-19, respectively, has downwardly bent flanges 20 on the upper edges of the side walls 19 for support of the shelf at the opposite ends, the shelves being mounted on pairs of horizontal rods 21-24 carried on the side frame members 5 and 6. The rods 21-23 are all substantially alike, each having the opposite ends thereof bent to U-shape, as indicated at 25, so as to provide coaxially aligned inturned end portions 26, the extremities of which are pivotally entered in coaxially aligned holes 27 punched in the front wall of the front leg 28 of each side frame member and in the rear wall of the rear leg 11 the rods being all of the same length measured between their U-bends 25 but the inturned end portions 26 on the uppermost rod 21 being the longest, while the inturned end portions 26 on the next lower pair of rods 22 are cut slightly shorter, and the inturned end portions 26 on the next lower pair of rods 23 are cut still shorter, whereby to conform in dimensions between the cut off extremities to the diiferent spacing of the downwardly diverging legs 19 and 28 at the different levels and permit pivotally securing the three pairs of rods 21, 22 and 23 by means of the end portions 26 against endwise displacement when assembled for pivotal movement in the holes 27. The legs 10 and 28 of each of the side frame members 5 and 6 are sprung toward each other to permit assembling the inturned ends 26 in the holes 27, and these legs are thereafter spread apart to prevent endwise displacement of the inturned ends 26 from the holes 27, this being accomplished in accordance with my invention by punching coaxially aligned holes 27' all the way through the legs 10 and 28 so that the inturned end portions 26 on the lowermost rods 24 can be passed through the holes 27 and have acorn nuts 29 threaded thereon, these end portions 26' being threaded, as indicated at 311, for this purpose. Once the nuts 2% have been applied and tight ened so as to cause the legs 10 and 23 to be drawn together to a predetermined extent the rods 24 are, of course, fastened thereby quite securely and there is no possibility thereafter of either of the other rods 21, 22 or 23 becoming disconnected from the frame, even though there is a certain amount of freedom for both pivotal and endwise movement in all of these last mentioned rods.

in operation, despite the downward divergence of the legs 1!; and 252 of the side frame members 5 and 6, all of the rods 21-24 can be and are all of substantially the same length between the U-bends 25, and the shelves 13-16 can be and are all alike and adapted to be used interchangeably. The shelves are supported in vertical alignment to one another, the uppermost shelf 13 projecting to an appreciable extent both rearwardly and forwardly from the frame, and shelves 14 and 15 also projecting at the front and rear of the rack but to lesser degrees, as clearly illustrated in FIG. 1, while only the bottom shelf 15 has its front and rear ends disposed substantially flush with the front and rear of the rack. This projection of the shelves 13-15 is considered to be of great benefit in merchandising from the standpoint that the articles on display on the shelves, if placed as far forward as possible, are more conspicuous and hence more apt to attract the attention of the prospective purchaser and thereby increase the likelihood of sales. With the present construction, sales are further promoted because the articles on the shelves are readily accessible from all sides of the rack, there being no need in the present construction for any diagonally extending brace members on either of the side members 5 and 6 nor even between these members at the rear, Where the cross members 7 and 8 are provided in such close relationship to the bottoms of shelves 13 and 15, respectively, that they cannot interfere with the freedom of access to articles on shelves 1 5 and 16 therebeneath. The nice appearance of the tubing used in the side members 5 and 6 is in no Way marred by the punching of the holes 27 and 27', and all of the rods 2l24 can be assembled on these side frame members without any harm to the bright galvanized and lacquered finish by virtue of the novel construction and method of assembly described. With other constructions requiring Welding operations this of course is not possible, where the only way the damage to finish can be rectified is 'by an additional costly plating and polishing operation, the cost of which is saved with the present invention.

It is believed the foregoing description conveys a good understanding of the objects and advantages of my invention. The-appended claims have been drawn to cover all legitimate modifications and adaptations.

I claim:

1. A display rack comprising opposed upright side frame members, each of which is resilient and of inverted U-shape providing downwardly diverging front and rear legs, said legs on each side frame member having vertically spaced horizontal holes provided therein above the lower end portions at a plurality of shelf levels, the holes at each level in each member being in coaxial relation but on the outer sides of the legs remote fromone another, a plurality of horizontal shelf support rods for the respective shelf levels disposed in transverse relation to the legs of each of saidside frame members on their adjacent inner sides, each of said rods having the opposite end portions projecting beyond said legs and provided with inwardly directed pivot pin portions in coaxial relationship having their inner ends arranged to be entered in a pair of the aforesaid coaxially arranged holes, the pivot pin portions on one end of the several rods for'each side frame member being entered to full depth first in the holes in one of said legs and said legs being springable toward each other to permit entry of the ends of the other pivot pinportions of the said several shelf support rods in the holes in the other leg of said side-frame member and said legs being springable'apart thereafter to retain said rods in assembled relationship to said legs, horizontal shelves mounted on said shelf support rods between said side frame members, and means for holding the legs of each of said side frame members in spread-apart relationship.

2. A display rack as set forth in claim 1 wherein the last mentioned means comprises another horizontal'shelf support rod in connection with the lower end portion of each of said side frame members on their inner sides, each of said rods having the opposite end portions there of projecting beyond said legs and having in spaced parallel relationship to said end portions inwardly directed threaded elongated end portions entered through coaxial horizontal holes provided in said legs and receiving nuts on the extremities thereof abutting the legs on their adjacent inner sides.

3. A display rack comprising opposed upright generally U-shaped tubular resilient frame members each providing substantially vertical front and rear legs, said legs on each side frame member having vertically spaced horizontal holes provided therein at a plurality of shelf levels, the holes in each level in each frame member being in coaxial relation but in the outer sides of the legs remote from one another, a plurality of horizontal shelf support rods fo the respective shelf levels disposed in vertically spaced parallel relation to one another, each of said rods having the opposite end portions bent U-shaped in coplanar relationship so as to provide in wardly directed coaxial pin portions on each rod ar- 4 ranged to engage ina pai of the aforesaid coaxially arranged holes, the pins on" one end of the several rods for each side frame member being entered to full depth first in the holes in one of the legs of said frame member and the legs being then springable toward each other for entry of the ends of the other pins on the said several shelf support rods in the holes in the other leg of said frame member after which said legs spring apart to retain said rods with the pins thereof in assembled relationship to said legs, means holdin the legs of each of said side irz members spread apart so as to retain said rods in assembled relationship to said legs, andhorizontal shelves for the respective shelf levels having means on the opposite ends thereof for supporting the same on the respective rods;

4. A display rack as set forth in claim 3, including cross-brace members rigidly interconnecting the side frame members independently of said shelves but in closely spaced parallel relationship to certain of said shelves.

5. A display rack as set forth in claim '3, wherein the last mentioned means comprises another horizontal shelf support rod on each of said side frame members near the ends of the legs, each of said rods having the opposite end portions bent U-shaped in coplanar relationship to one another providing coaxially arranged pins legs, the end portions of said pins being threaded and receiving nuts on the extre nities thereof which when tightened against the inner sides of the legs serve to spread the same apart, thereby securing-said rods to said legs and maintaining all of the other rods in assembled relationship'to said legs.

6. As a new article of manufacture, a' generally U-shapedframe member providing diverging legs, the legs having vertically spaced horizontal holes provided therein, each pair of holes at each level being in'coaxial relation to one another but extending inwardly from the outer side's of the legs remote from one another, a plurality of h rizontalrods inverticalry spaced parallel relation, each having the opposed ends bent U-shaped to provide inwardly directed pins in coaxial relationship for entry in a pair of said holes in said legs, thepins on one end of the several rods being entered to .full depth first in the holes in one of said legs after which said legs are springablc toward each other to permit entry of the ends of the other pins of the said several rods inthe holes in the other leg, whereupon said legs are springable apart to retain said rods in assembled relationship to said legs, and another horizontal rod nearest the ends of said legs having the opposite. ends thereof bent U-shaped in coplanar relationship to one another to provide coaxiallyarranged pins which are-entered through coaxially arranged horizontal through holes provided in said legs, the projecting ends of said pins being threaded'and receivingnuts on the extremities thereof abutting the legs on their inner sides, whereby when saidnut are tightened thelegs are spread apart to secure the rod to said frame and retain all of the rods in assembled relationshiprto 'said frame.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification108/59, 108/177, 211/186, 108/158.11, 108/179
International ClassificationA47F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/01
European ClassificationA47F5/01