Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3062204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date6 Nov 1962
Filing date19 Aug 1960
Priority date19 Aug 1960
Publication numberUS 3062204 A, US 3062204A, US-A-3062204, US3062204 A, US3062204A
InventorsStefano Nicholas M
Original AssigneeStefano Nicholas M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Physical therapy machine
US 3062204 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1962 N. M. STEFANO PHYSICAL THERAPY MACHINE INVENTOR. mmww 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 E .[IIIIIIIH g Illllllll PIMP Filed Aug. 19, 1960 Nov. 6, 1962 N. M. STEFANO 3,

PHYSICAL THERAPY MACHINE Filed Aug. 19, 1960/ 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 6, 19 62 N. M. STEFANO 3,062,204

PHYSICAL THERAPY MACHINE Filed Aug. 19, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 0v. 6v. as??? I F' FIG. 4 Y I 91 D Eli M ez gtl-gm,

I III O C l l INVENTOR.

my saga.

Nov. 6, 1962 N. M. STEFANO 3,062,204

PHYSICAL THERAPY MACHINE Filed Aug. 19, 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Uited States Patent thee 3,052,204 Patented Nov. 6, 1962 3,062,204 PHYSICAL TIERAPY MACHINE Nicholas M. Stefano, 1711 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. Filed Aug. 19, 1960, Ser. No. 50,757 12 Claims. (Cl. 12825) This invention relates to devices employed to passively move the limbs of human beings who physically cannot, or should not, employ muscular effort to perform the motions. Such devices are also employed to move the limbs of persons having sedentary occupations. In either case, the objective is to regenerate muscular tissue, or to prevent the degeneration of muscular tissue, with the employment of minimal muscular effort, and with only a gentle stimulation of the respiratory and circulatory systems.

Devices that have been employed heretofore have simulated the leg motion used to pedal a bicycle, with or without an oscillating motion of the handle bars, and/or the seat. The knee joint, in such devices, is always only partially flexed, and is not simultaneously flexed and extended to the limits of its motion. Further, the ankle joint, because of the location of the foot pedal pivot, has relatively little dorsi-flexion or plantar-fiexion, thus partially immobilizing four (4) muscles in the former case, and eight (8) muscles in the latter, one of which is the calf muscle. In the case of the hip joint, although there is a moderate amount of flexion produced by the bicycle pedaling action, there is very little extension produced, and no rotation, circumduction, abduction, and adduction. Although a prior device overcomes this deficiency of motion, by substituting the oscillating motion of the handlebars (on which the feet are placed) for the bicycle pedaling motion, the resultant position of the patient is precarious and dangerous, since he may fall against the oscillating mechanisms and then be in a position where he cannot stop the device.

In prior devices which utilize a stationary handlebar, the elbow, shoulder, scapulo-clavicular, and vertebral column joints are practically immobilized. In those prior devices wherein the handlebar is provided with a small oscillating motion, the range of motion is so limited as to be practically ineffective. In prior devices, wherein the handlebar and the seat are both provided with an oscillating motion, the patient must consciously immobilize the elbow, shoulder, and scapulo-clavicular joint in order to provide an effectual degree of extension of the vertebral column joints. Also, though there is produced a satisfactory degree of extension, there is very little flexion of the joints provided by this procedure, coincidentally thus neglecting the very important abdominal musculature. Further, with this same device, only conscious muscular eflort on the part of the patient can provide flexion and extension of the elbow; fiexion, extension, abduction and rotation of the shoulder; and motion of the scapulo-clavicular joint.

Although some of the prior devices provide for selective elimination of the bicycle pedal motion, or handlebar and seat motion, none of the prior devices provide for an adjustable positioning of the immobilized location of the pedals or handlebar. This is essential if certain muscles and joints must be immobilized or limited in their motion because of injury or diseases sustained by those joints or muscles. By progressive adjustment of the immobilized location of the pedals or handlebar, during a period of several weeks or months of physical therapy, the diseased muscles and joints can be gradually developed to an increased range of mobility. This basic objective also requires that the amplitude of the foot pedal and handlebar motion be adjustable in small increments over a Wide range. Another purpose is thus served, which is the adaptation of the machine to the full range of patients of different anatomical structure, ranging from children to large adults.

It is important, in physical therapy of this type, to increase the patients range of motion, which requires that each treatment be adjusted to the full limit of the patients current range of motion; the range of motion will thus increase as the physical therapy treatment proceeds over a period of weeks or months. None of the prior devices provides the incremental adjustment of amplitude of foot pedal and handlebar motion required.

For patients who suffer from no particular muscular or joint injury, but are simply interested in improving muscle tone and joint stability, it is important to avoid lapse of interest, to provide a continuous series of different exercises without constant interruption for machine adjustments. Prior art does not disclose devices which produce this result.

Although prior art discloses the use of electrical safety controls, wherein a button must be depressed by the patient to keep the motors of the physical therapy machine operating, it is possible that the patient may not release the button because of fear of falling should he release his grip on the handlebar with the hand which is used to depress the button. Accordingly it is essential that release of the grip of either hand from the handlebar should stop all motors.

Also, the prior art does not disclose any use of electrical safety controls, wherein the motors are stopped when a rapidly moving part of the machine accidentally strikes the patient.

It is a primary objective of this invention to provide, in a physical therapy machine, means for simultaneously moving the patients arms and legs in a periodic motion, wherein both arms move in phase, and both legs move in phase, in such a manner as to produce complete passive fiexion and extension of the knee joint; complete passive flexion, and moderate passive extension, rotation, circumduction, abduction and adduction of the hip joint; passive motion of the lumbo-sacral, sacro-iliac, and symphysis pubis joints; passive flexion and extension of the vertebral column joints; full passive motion of the scapulo-clavicular joint; full passive fiexion and extension, and moderate passive abduction and rotation of the shoulder joint; and full passive fiexion and extension of the elbow joint.

It is a further object of this invention to provide means whereby the periodic leg motion is accompanied by periodic and complete passive plantar-fiexion and dorsi-fiexion of the ankle joint.

Another object of this invention is to provide means whereby the leg (or arm) motion may be stopped and fixed at any position within the range of motion, while the arm (or leg) periodic motion continues.

A further object is to provide means whereby the amplitude of the leg motion and the amplitude of the arm motion is each individually adjustable by small increents.

Another object is to provide means for incremental adjustment of the seat position with respect to the terminal position of the arms or legs.

A further object is to pro-vide means whereby changes in the amplitude of both the leg and the arm motion occur principally in that part of the motion nearest the seat, so

that the seat adjustment will simultaneously permit adjustment for short legs and arms (or long legs and arms), since these generally occur together in the same anatomy.

It is another object of this invention to provide means whereby the periodic leg motion and periodic arm motion are driven at different frequencies such that there is a periodic change in the phase relationship of the cyclic aoeazoe 'thus periodically changing the type of exercise from a rowing to a squatting and bending over exercise.

Another ob ect is to provide means whereby all motor actuation ceases when either hand of the patient is re moved from the handlebars.

A further object is to provide means whereby contact of the end of the handle bar actuating arm with the patients body, or any other object, will cause all motor actuation to cease, and remain inactivated until a master switch is turned, OFF, and then turned ON again.

.And finally, a last object of this invention is to provide means whereby all electrical wiring contained in the oscillating parts of the machine carries a low voltage (6 volts), to avoid possible injuries due to frayed wires carrying normal house current voltage (110 v.).

I achieve these and other objects in a manner as set forth in the following specification and illustrated in the appended drawings, in which:

b1FIGURE 1 is a side view of the physical therapy mac ne;

FIGURE 2 is a top vop view of the machine of FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a section view taken on line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a wiring diagram for the machine;

FIGURE 5 is a section view taken on line 5-5 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 6 is a front view of the handlebars of the machine illustrating the safety switching means;

FIGURE 7 is a top View similar to FIGURE 2 but with several parts omitted and several parts broken away for simplicity to show an alternate construction of the machine; and

FIGURE 8 is a section view taken on line 8-8 of FIGURE 7.

In FIGURE 1, the basic structural frame indicated at 10 is made up of side frames 11 and 11 and cross members 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. Cross members 17 and 18 are relatively short (approximately 2",), since side frames 11 and 11 are spread apart by that distance in these regions. A diagonal member extends diagonally across from one end of cross member 15 to the opposite end of cross member 16 in order to provide an ample amount of rigidity in this area. Vertical leg 22 and rubber foot 23 are attached to side frame 11 to provide support at the rear of the machine. Similarly, vertical leg 22 and rubber foot 23 are attached to side frame 11' to support the rear of the machine at the opposite side. An axle 24 at the front of the machine extends laterally outside of, and is attached to, sideframes 11 and 11, and a pair of wheels 25, 25 are rotatably mounted upon the axle 24. Thus, the entire machine may be moved by lifting at either cross member 15 or cross member 16, until rubber feet 23, 23 are clear of the floor, and rolling the machine on the wheels 25, 25'.

A seat 26is mounted on top of frame 10 and is retained by a U shaped clamp 27 which engages side frames 11 and 11'. Astud bolt 28 is attached to the bottom of the seat 26 to extend between the two side frame members 11 and 11 and through the clamp 27. A hand nut 29 on the stud 28 provides for tightening the clamp to retain the seat in any of several adjusted positions between the extreme rearward position shown in solid lines and the most forward position indicated in broken lines.

A pair of tubular handlebar members 39, 30' are at-' tached to one end of a tubular handlebar lever 31, the opposite end of which is attached, as by welding or brazing,'to a transverse tubular sleeve 32 which rotates on a horizontal axle 33. The axle 33 is attached at its ends to the side frames 11 and 11 by suitable straps 34, 34 which may be welded or brazed to the frames. Suitable ,pin fastenings 35, 35 passing through aligned openings in the axle and the straps prevent any sliding or rotational movement of the axle. The handlebar lever 31 is maintained in a centered position on the axle 33 by a pair of collars 36, 36 abutting the ends of the sleeve 32 which are locked in position by means of pins 37, 37' engaging aligned openings in the collars and the axle. Tubular members 38, 38 engaging the lever 31 and the bearing 32 serve as bracing for the lever 31.

A tubular driving arm 39 is attached at one end to the handlebar lever 31 and braced at its opposite end by a curved tubular member 40. As shown in FIGURES l and 5 a tubular, partially split, sleeve 41 encircles and slides on arm 39 between the limits of the two pins 42,.

42. The split sleeve 41 may be locked to the arm 39 in any of several adjusted positions by means of a clamp 43 around the slotted ends of sleeve 41, a clamping shoe 44 which is forced against the sleeve by means of a hand screw 45. An end pin 46 in the clamp 43 engages an opening in the sleeve 41 to assist in maintaining the clamp in position on the sleeve.

An electrical power means in the form of an electric motor 47, through a standard worm gear assembly enclosed within the housing 48, turns a shaft 49 at a speed, preferably, of about 36 revolutions per minute, to which is attached a'crank 59. The crank 56) is connected by link 51 to the adjustable sleeve 41 through a yoke 52 bolted to the end of the link 51 to cause the lever 31 to oscillate back and forth between any of several adjusted positions defined by the two extreme positions indicated in FIGURE 1 by full lines to show the most forward position and by broken lines to show the most rearward position. The rear motor 47 and gear housing 48 are mounted by motor mount 53 on mounting bracket 54 which is attached, as by welding or brazing, to the frame cross braces 14 and 15.

A pair of foot engaging members in like supports 55, 55'

foot support levers 57, 57 which are attached at their opposite ends to a single, tubular member 58 which ro-j tates on an axle member 59 attached to the side frame members 11 and 11 by straps 69, 60' welded or brazed to the frame members. Pins 61, 61' passing through aligned openings in the straps 60, 68' and the ends of the axle 59 anchor the axle and prevent its turning or shifting while allowing the parts to be readily disassembled. Collars 62, 62 on the axle 59 abutting, respectively, the ends of the sleeve bearing member 58 and locked to the axle by pins 63, 63', position the bearing 58 in a centered location on the axle. Each of the two foot support levers is braced, respectively, to the bearing 58 by brace members 64, 64'. has, respectively, heel plates 65, 65 thereon to position the feet of a patient on the foot supports and strap mem bers 66, 66 encircle the front portion of the feet to prevent them from slipping from the supports and also assists in positioning the feet on the supports. The points 56 and 56' at which the foot supports 55, 55 are pivoted on the two levers 57, 57' are heel plates 65, 65' and toward the front of the patients feet and substantially oif-setfrom the effective center of the ankle joint thereby forcing dorsi-flexion and plantarfiexion of the ankle joint.

A second electrical power means in electric motor 67 similar to the 47 drives a worm gear assembly enclosed within the housing 68 to'turn a shaft 69 at a speed, preferably of about 29 revolutions per minute. The motor and gear assembly are mounted by means of a motor mount 70 on the front end of the frame by bolting to the two cross braces 12 which is pivoted a link 72 which, through a yoke 73, joins the crank to an adjustable split sleeve 74. The sleeve 74, of the same construction as that of the sleeve 41 previously described, encircles and slides on the foot;

support lever 57. The sleeve is adjustable to any posithe form of pedal: are each pivoted on cross tubes 56, 56, respectively, each of which is attached to arpair of.

Each of the foot support members 55, 55' 7 located well forward of the the form of an first power means motor and 13. The shaft 69 turns a crank 71 to tion between the upper and lower pins 75, 75' and is locked in any desired position between the two limits by the clamp 76 which is of the same construction as the clamp 43. A hand screw 77 engages a clamping shoe 78 to force it against the sleeve 76 to cause it to grip the lever 57'. The pin 79 in the end of the clamp 76 engages an opening in the sleeve 74 to position the clamp on the sleeve.

As shown best in FIGURE 1, a cross brace member 17 between the two side frame members 11, 11 and just to the rear of the seat 26 convenient to the patient, sup ports a switch box 19 incorporating a signal light 20, a master switch 21, a rear motor switch 80 and a front motor switch 81. Referring next to FIGURE 6 there is shown a safety switching means comprising a plungertype switch 32 within the handlebar St a second plungertype switch 83 within the handlebar 3G and a bodily contact type switch 84 mounted in the center of the handlebars. A hand grip lever 93 pivoted on a bolt 94 passing through the handlebar lever 31 bears against the plunger of normally open switch 82 when the fingers, or forefinger, of the patients left hand presses, or squeezes the lever toward the handlebar and thereby closes the switch 82. Likewise, a hand grip lever 95 also pivoted on the bolt 94 bears against the plunger and closes the normally open switch 83 when the right hand presses the lever toward the handlebar. The plungers of the left hand switch 82 and right hand switch 83 are spring loaded to maintain the switches in the open position. The body contact switch 84 has a preformed convex shaped re silient diaphragm 89, which may be made of rubber, covering the switch mechanism which is shown in the wiring diagram FIGURE 4.

In FIGURE 4 the machine is plugged in on household 110 volt supply which is led to a step-down transformer 85, through a master switch 21, to reduce the voltage from 110 to six. A signal light 20 indicates when the master switch is in the closed position and the machine ready to operate. When normally open hand switches 82 and 83 are closed current is conducted to the body contact switch assembly 84 which consists of a resilient finger 88, preferably of rubber, relay contact 87, relay 86 and second relay contact 98. The circuit is completed to the rear motor 47 and front motor 67 respectively through the switches 89 and 31 and relays 81 and 92.

In operation, the split adjustable sleeve 41 is moved along the driving arm 39 until the stroke of handlebar lever 31 is that which is desired whereupon the hand screw is tightened to lock the sleeve 41 in position. Next, the split sleeve 74 is moved along the foot support lever 57 until the position is found where the two foot support levers 57, 57' oscillate through the desired arc whereupon the hand screw 77 is tightened to lock it in place. Next, the seat 26 is adjusted fore or aft to the required position and the hand nut tightened to lock the seat in position. With the patient on the seat 26, the feet are placed on the two foot supports 55, 55' and the master switch is closed to energize the circuit. Next, the switches 80 and 81 are closed to complete the circuit to the two motors 47 and 67. The patient next places both hands on the handlebars 3t 30' and with the forefinger of each hand, closes the two safety switches 82 and 83 by pressing the two levers 93 and 95, or rather by pulling the two levers, toward the handlebars. The closing of the two safety switches 82 and 83 completes the circuit to the two motors 47 and 67 which then run to oscillate the handlebars 30, 30 back and forth between the two adjusted positions already selected and to oscillate the two feet engaging members 55, 55' back and forth between the two selected adjusted positions at a rate of oscillation different from the rate of oscillation of the handlebars. The motions of the machine will continue until the safety means on the handlebars are operated whereupon the motions of the machine are stopped. For example, if either one of the two hand safety switches is opened, current to both motors 47 and 67 is cut off and the motors stop. Also, if the rubber diaphragm 89 should strike any part of the patients body the rubber finger plunger 88 presses on the contact 87 to cause it to close (FIGURE 4) which energizes the relay 86 and opens the contact 90. As normally closed switch 90 is opened, the circuit is broken to both motors 47 and 67 and they stop running. It will be noted that the self-energizing relay 86 holds contact 87 closed and contact 96 (which is normally closed) open until the master switch 21 is opened, allowing the contacts to re turn to normal. Thus the motor relay circuits are broken and remain broken until the master switch is opened, preventing injury to the patient. All wiring between the electrical elements is preferably contained within the tubular side frames 11, 11 and the tubular handlebar lever 31, except at the bottom of the axle 33, and the frame of the machine is grounded through the frame of the motor 47 by one wire of a three wire power cord as shown schematically in the wiring diagram of FIGURE 4. For safety, the circuits which are carried in any moving part of the machine (with the exception of the motor armatures) are low voltage (6 volts) circuits. These circuits comprise all wires leading from the transformer and relays 91 and 92, to switch contacts 82 and 83 and to switch means 84. Should the motion of the machine ever cause fraying of any wires, no serious injury can occur.

Although the preferred embodiment of the machine has been described and likewise, its operation, particular note should be made of certain features. For example, it will be noted that the most rearward position of the handlebars forces the patient to bend backward to such an extent that he is forced into a substantial extension of the vertebral column joints, rearward movement of the scapulo-clavicular joint, substantial extension and abduction of the shoulder joint, and full flexion of the elbow. Further, since the amplitude of handlebar motion is adjustable in minute increments there is no difliculty in suiting the motion to current anatomical lmits of the patient. Also, the particular handlebar motion limits that have been devised for the machine, together with the seat and leg motion adjustments, have been tested with a number of people from ten year old children to exceptionally large adults, with complete adaptability to their needs. Since the two lever means for oscillating the feet of the patient are adjustable in minute increments, the amplitude of the motion may be adjusted incrementally between the extremes of motion. It should be noted that the major reduction in the amplitude occurs on the side nearest the seat for both the foot support motion and the handlebar motion. This arrangement is necessary to proper adjustment of the motions to the anatomy of the patient by forward or rearward adjustment of the seat. It should also be noted that the previously described difference in rate of oscillation of the hands engaging means and the feet engaging means causes a cyclic variation of exercise from a rowing type of exercise to a squatting and bending over exercise to be produced.

While the preferred embodiment of the machine has been described and shown in the FIGURES 1 through 6 a variation in construction is shown in the FIGURES 7 and 8 wherein all motion of the machine is provided by a single power means instead of two. To accomplish this, the gear box 48 incorporates the usual worm gear drive indicated at 96 but is connected to the crank arm 50 on one side by a suitable clutch 97 for selectively driving or stopping the crank 50 while the motor 47 is running. Also, the drive is connected to a bevel gear 93 through a clutch 99 for selectively driving or stopping the bevel gear 98 while the motor is running. The crank 50 drives the handlebar lever in the same manner as previously described and shown in the other FIGURES l, 2 and 3. However the foot oscillating levers are driven hands engaging means in a 7 through a system of shafts and gear-ing. The bevel gear 98 engages and drives a bevel gear 100 on the upper end of vertical shaft 101 which is supported in upper bearing 102, bolted or otherwise suitably attached to the mounting bracket 54, and by lower bearing 103 which may be a substantially square bar of metal welded to the cross brace 14. A collar 104 on the shaft 101 may be locked to the shaft by a set screw to position the shaft and maintain the gears in proper engagement. A lower bevel gear 105 engages a similar bevel gear 106 on longitudinal shaft 107 which is supported at the aft end by a bearing member 108 welded to the cross brace 14 and at the forward end by a bearing member 109 welded to the cross brace member 13. A'forward bevel gear 110 on the forward end of the shaft 107 engages a bevel gear 111 on the lower end of a short vertical shaft 112 which is supported by and journalled in the forward housing 68. An upper bevel gear 113 on the upper end of the vertical shaft 112 engages a similar bevel gear 114 on the end of the drive shaft 69 which turns the crank 71 which, through the link 72, drives the foot support lever 57' in its oscillating motion. The required difference in rate of oscillation of the handlebars and the foot supports may be provided in this arrangement, for example, by choosing the proper number of teeth on the bevel gears 111 and 114 which are in mesh which will then be a different number than the number of teeth on all the other gears in the gear train. For example, if the driving gear 98 is turning at the desired rate of about 36 revolutions per minute, then the gearing is selected whereby the driven gear 114 will turn at the desired rate of about 29 revolutions per minute. In order to provide ample clearance for the forward shafting and gearing, the usual axle 24 has been eliminated and replaced by pair of threaded stud bolt axles, one of which is shown at 115, held in place against the frame members by means of nuts 1 16 and 117, to support the wheels.

It will be understood and obvious to those skilled in the art that other variations and modifications of the present invention may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A physical therapy machine comprising a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; oscillating means on said frame adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; separate oscillating means mounted on said frame at a point different from that of said hands engaging means for independent oscillation thereof adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the said feet in unison; and means for oscillating of said feet engaging means at a rate difierent from the rate of oscillation of said hands engaging means whereby a periodic change in the phase relationship of the cyclic leg and arm motion is produced to cause a cyclic variation of exercise from a rowing to a squatting and bending over exercise.

2. A physical therapy machine according to claim 1 wherein the separate pair of levers each of which is pivoted at one end on said frame, a foot support pivoted on the other end of each of said levers and means joining said levers to cause said levers to oscillate in unison. i

3. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; oscillating means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; separate oscillating means pivoted on said frame at a point different from the pivot point of said hands engaging means to oscillate independently thereof adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the feet of said patient in unison; electric power means on said frame; means connecting said power means and said hands engaging means to oscillate said fore and aft direction at a pre-selected rate; means connecting said power means and said feet engaging means feet oscillating means comprises a to oscillate said feet en- 1 L3 gaging means in a fore and aft direction at a rate dif ferent from the rate of oscillation of said hands engaging means whereby a periodic change in the phase relationship of the cyclic leg and arm motion is produced to cause a cyclic variation of exercise from a rowing to a squatting and bending over exercise; adjusting means associated with said hands engaging means for adjusting the amplitude of oscillation thereoff; adjusting means associated with said feet engaging means for adjusting the amplitude of oscillation thereof; and patient operated switching means for selectively disconnecting either said hands engaging means or said feet engaging means from said power means.

4. The structure in accordance with claim 3 including safety switching means comprising a pair of normally open switches adapted to be closed by the hands of said patient grasping said hands engaging means to operate said electric power means and a normally closed switch adapted to open upon contact with the body of said patient, the opening of one of said switches causing the operation of said electric power means to stop.

5. A physical therapy machine comprisin a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; oscillating means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; separate oscillating means pivoted on said frame at a point difierent from the pivot point of said hands engaging means adopted to engage the feet of said patient to move the feet of said patient in unison; a first electric power means operatively connected to said hands engaging means to oscillate said hands engaging means between fore and aft adjusted positions at a preselected rate of oscillation; a second electric power means operatively connected to said feet engaging means to oscillate said feet engaging means between fore and aft adjusted positions at a rate different from the rate of oscillation of said hands engaging means; and patient operated switching means for selectively operating said first and said second electric power means.

6. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame, a

patient supporting seat on said frame; a handlebar lever pivotally mounted on said frame; handlebars carried by said lever; a first electrical power means operatively connected to said lever to oscillate said lever between fore and aft adjusted positions at a pre-selected rate of oscillation; a separate foot support lever means pivotally mounted on said frame for oscillation between adjusted fore and aft positions; a second electrical power means operatively connected to said foot support lever means to oscillate said foot support lever means at a rate of oscillation different from the rate of oscillation of said handlebar lever; and safety switching means associated with said handlebars for controlling the operation of said first and said second electrical power means, the said switching means comprising a pair of normally open switches adapted to be closed by the hands of said patient grasping said handlebars to operate said first and said second electrical power means and a normally closed switch adapted to open upon contact with the body of said patient, the opening of one of said switches causing the operation of both said firstand said second power means to stop.

7. The structure in accordance with claim 3 including safety switching means associated with said hands engaging means for controlling the operation of said electric power means, the said operation being stopped upon the opening of said switching means, the said selecting means including a separate switch connecting said power means to said switching means whereby said separate switch must be first opened and then closed before said stopped operation can be resumed.

8. The structure in accordance with claim 5 including safety'switchin-g means associated with said hands engaging means including a first switch connecting said first power means to said switching means and a second switch connecting said second power means to said switching means, and a master switch in circuit with said safety switching means and said selecting switches whereby said master switch must be first opened and then closed before said stopped operation can be resumed.

9. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; a hands oscillating lever means pivoted at one end on said frame; a handlebar on the other end thereof adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; a second separate oscillating lever means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the said feet in unison; foot support means pivoted on said second lever means; electrical power means; adjustable means connecting said power means to said hands oscillating lever means; second adjustable means connecting said power means to said second lever means, the rate of oscillation of said second lever means being different from the rate of oscillation of said hands oscillating lever means; a pair of normally open safety switches adapted to be closed by the hands of said patient grasping said handle bar to operate said power means; and a normally closed safety switch adapted to open upon contact thereof with the body of said patient, the opening of one of said safety switches causing the operation of said power means to stop.

10. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; oscillating means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; separate oscillating means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the feet of said patient in unison; a first electric power means operatively connected to said hands engaging means to oscillate said hands engaging means between fore and aft adjusted positions at a preselected rate of oscillation; a second electric power means operatively connected to said feet engaging means to oscillate said feet engaging means between fore and aft adjusted positions at a rate different from the rate of oscillation of said hands engaging means; patient operated switching means for selectively operating said first and said second electric power means; a pair of normally open safety switches adapted to be closed by the hands of said patient grasping said hands engaging means to operate said first and said second electric power means;

and a normally closed safety switch adapted to open upon contact with the body of said patient, the opening of one of said safety switches causi; the operation of both said first and said second power means to stop.

11. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; a hands oscillating lever means pivoted at one end on said frame; a handlebar on the other end thereof adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; a second separate oscillating lever means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the said feet in unison; foot support means pivoted on said second lever means; electrical power means; adjustable means connecting said power means to said hands oscillating lever means; and second adjustable means connecting said power means to said second lever means, the rate of oscilllation of said second lever means being different from the rate of oscillation of said hands oscillating lever means.

12. A physical therapy machine comprising: a frame; a patient supporting seat on said frame; oscillating means pivoted on said frame adapted to engage the hands of said patient when seated on said seat; separate oscillating means pivoted on said frame at a point different from the pivot point of said hands engaging means to oscillate independently thereof adapted to engage the feet of said patient to move the feet of said patient in unison; power means on said frame; means connecting said power means and said hands engaging means to oscillate said hands engaging means in a fore and aft direction at a preselected rate; and means connecting said power means and said feet engaging means to oscillate said feet engaging means in a fore and aft direction at a rate different from the rate of oscillation of said hands engaging means whereby a periodic change in the phase relationship of the cyclic leg and arm motion is produced to cause a cyclic variation of exercise from a rowing to a squatting and bending over exercise.

References Qited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,498,529 Allen June 24, 1924 2,130,922 Hawley Sept. 20, 1938 2,226,881 Voiles Dec. 31, 1940 2,405,024 Eynon July 30, 1946 2,641,251 Brockman June 9, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1498529 *21 Nov 192124 Jun 1924Allen James BExercising machine
US2130922 *30 Sep 193620 Sep 1938Hawley William SPhysical culture machine
US2226881 *24 Apr 194031 Dec 1940Voiles Frank AExercising stand
US2405024 *26 May 194430 Jul 1946Thomas M EynonExercising device
US2641251 *27 Dec 19509 Jun 1953Healthomatic CorpAttachment for exercising machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3189346 *11 Feb 196315 Jun 1965Laforest S SaulsburyJumping sticks
US3940128 *6 Jan 197524 Feb 1976Vitamaster Industries, Inc.Exercising apparatus
US4566440 *9 Feb 198428 Jan 1986Empi, Inc.Orthosis for leg movement with virtual hip pivot
US5658223 *3 May 199619 Aug 1997Pacific Fitness CorporationRecumbent leg exerciser
US5722916 *25 Oct 19963 Mar 1998Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Adjustable stationary exercise bicycle
US5897459 *8 Jul 199727 Apr 1999Tnwk CorporationRecumbent leg exerciser
US6155958 *5 Feb 19985 Dec 2000Madd Dog Athletics, Inc.Stationary exercise bicycle having a rigid frame
US646818528 Sep 200022 Oct 2002Mad Dog Athletics, Inc.Stationary exercise bicycle
US655767923 Aug 19996 May 2003Nautilus, Inc.Free wheel clutch mechanism for bicycle drive train
US664150723 Aug 19994 Nov 2003Nautilus, Inc.Free wheel clutch mechanism for bicyclic drive train
US67936087 Mar 200221 Sep 2004Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Stationary exercise bicycle
US688117828 Feb 200219 Apr 2005Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Method of exercising on a stationary bicycle
US717253213 Jul 20046 Feb 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise device tubing
US71755706 Mar 200213 Feb 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle frame
US722639317 Jan 20025 Jun 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle
US736453313 Jul 200429 Apr 2008Nautilus, Inc.Adjustment assembly for exercise device
US741353024 May 200519 Aug 2008Nautilus, Inc.Frame for an exercise bicycle
US745562723 Feb 200525 Nov 2008Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Stationary exercise bicycle
US74882756 Mar 200210 Feb 2009Nautilus, Inc.Free wheel clutch mechanism for bicycle drive train
US75690019 Mar 20014 Aug 2009Nautilus, Inc.Free wheel clutch mechanism for bicycle drive train
US759176512 Jun 200322 Sep 2009Nautilus, Inc.Free wheel clutch mechanism for bicycle drive train
US77713254 Jun 200710 Aug 2010Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle
US7905817 *28 Aug 200715 Mar 2011Guru Cycles Inc.Adjustable stationary bicycle
US80212772 Feb 200520 Sep 2011Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Programmed exercise bicycle with computer aided guidance
US805736410 Jun 200815 Nov 2011Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Stationary exercise bicycle
US850645716 Aug 201113 Aug 2013Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc.Programmed exercise bicycle with computer aided guidance
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/36, 482/57, 482/63
International ClassificationA61H1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/02
European ClassificationA61H1/02