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Publication numberUS2898137 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date4 Aug 1959
Filing date16 Jul 1953
Priority date16 Jul 1953
Publication numberUS 2898137 A, US 2898137A, US-A-2898137, US2898137 A, US2898137A
InventorsKreske Walter J
Original AssigneeKreske Walter J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retracting flange device
US 2898137 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 4, 1959 w. J. KRESKE 2,898,137 I RETRACTING FLANGE DEVICE Filed July 16, 1953 FL .1 2o 3o 0 a a INVENTOR RETRACTING FLANGE DEVICE Walter J. Kreske, Newton Center, Mass. Application July 16, 1953, Serial No. 368,465 '8 Claims. 01. 2s7-s 2.o7

' This invention relates to mechanisms .for retaining 1' sleeve type members in place on shafts and the like.

U it See It'lis often necessary and desirable to provide a device for shafts and the'like which will hold in place sleeve typeinembers mounted thereon. Existing fastenings for this purpose of which a washer and nut arrangement is the most common, are generally inadequate for those instances where the rapid removal of the sleeve type member is desired. Also a common criticism of existing fastening devicesis the need for special tools toelfe'ct their removal. Such need for special tools entails not only the additional ience required in its procurement for each such removal operation. Another criticism is that the fastening device is generally composed of one or more elements which 'must be removed. from the shaft or the like before the I expense of the special tool but .also the time and inconvene sleeve type member may be removed. Such separable.

fastening elements, by their removability, them subject to being lost or mislaid. v

Pursuant to the present invention, the above have. been overcome in a retracting flange device for holding sleeve ,type members in place and which also entails other desirable objects, featuresand advantagm. Among these are a device which is hand operable by a simple rotary twist in one direction for the mounting operation, and a twist in the oppositedirection for the releasing operation.

Another is a device which will not release the sleevetype member even when subjected to heavy axial and rotary loads. Still another isv a devicewhich permits .rotary motion of the mounted member withoutimpairing the vs'ecureness with which'themember is 'heldin place.

Still another is a device which though needing only finger ltip pressure for the locking'foperation, efie'ctively fre- .tainslmounted members in place against heavy and radial loads. Another is a device composed of relatively iew .eomponents and lends itself to relatively inexpensive (manufacture. And another is a devicewhichpermits the lions-subject to high temperature'conditionst V These and other features objects andadvantages of, the ention willbecome more apparent from the following iuseQ-ofaluminumalloy working components even in loca- 4 I deseription takenin connection with the accompanying drawings of a preferred embodiment of the invention and a hers n Fig. 1 is a cross sectional'view of the preferred em- .bodimenttaken on line 1-1 of Fig. 3,

Fig, 2 is a cross sectional 'ew of a portion of Fig. 1 in enlargedscale with one of the flanged elements shown inaeleyation and operating position of the components .shown in; broken lines tomore clearly show construction an ope t ig-.1 .111s n wvie i e efit l e Fig. 4 is an isometric view of the tubulanmonn'ting .member ofthe device shown-in Fig. 1 to more clearly s ns .onfi t s1 s n i m t rp h ise fw s portrtandpn ra i a e d,

Fig. 6 is a view partly in cross sectidn elevation of a portion of the device shown with the flanges in retaining or projecting position and supported by the support and operating head, j 1 Fig. 7 is an end view taken on line 7--7 of Figk 6 to "more clearly show the flange and slide construction,

Fig. 8 is a side elevation of a gas operated rifle with the preferred embodiment of the invention fixed to the end of the gas cylinder thereof and having mounted thereon a bipod with sleeve type housing.

Referring to the drawings in more detail, the preferred embodiment is in the form ofa gas cylinder plug adapter for mounting a bipod such as that described in my application No. 205,973 filed January 15, 1951, now'Pat ent No. 2,807,904 to the end of the gas cylinder of a gas operated rifle. The gas cylinder plug adapter is designated generally by the numeral 10 (Fig. 1). The adapter '10 has a'hollow cylindrical tubular member 12-open at. its front end 14. The back end of the tubular member .12 is closed by a wall 16 which is part of a gas cylinder plug 18 extending axially at the back end of the tubularmember 12. The gas cylinder plug 18 has a circurnferentially threaded portion 20 and gas sealing shoulders or lands 22 of conventional gas cylinder plug design for screwing into the end of and thereby closing a gas cylinder 24of a gas operated rifle 26 such as a military shoulder rifle known as' the T-47 rifle. A cavity or recess 28 is provided axially in the gas cylinder plug to reduce weight of the adapter and provide part of the gas chamber of the gas cylinder 24. Between the gas cylinderplug 18 and the tubular member 12 is a radially disposed flange or shoulder 30 which may be provided with flats 32 about the periphery thereof to form a nut for applying a wrench in screwing the gas cylinder plug 18 into the end of the gas cylinder 24. V

i The front end 14 of the tubular member 12 has aitransverse slot to thereby form axially extending projections or guide members 34 (Figs. 4 and 7) with transversely disposed parallel guide surfaces 36. Slidablycarried. between the transverse guide surfaces 36 are two oppositely disposed transverse flanges 38. The transverse flanges 38 are each fixed to the end of an arm.40.which extends inwardly into the tubular member 12.. The .inner end of each arm 40 has a parallel sided projection 42 closely fitted at its parallel sides in a supporting a slot 44 at the front end of a hollow cylindrical intermediate member 46. A pivot pin 48 perpendicular to thetransverse guide surfaces 36 extends through each projection 42 and intermediatemember 46 at the-supporting slot 44. Each of the arms 40 is thereby mounted to pivot at its end-so that each flange 38 slides transversely to'thetubular member 12 between the guide surfaces 36 to either project above the front end of the tubular member. 12. as shown in Fig. 6 or retractbelow the outside'peripher'alsurface of the tubular member 12 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

.and an axially disposed gripping web.58 for manually rotating the worm gear 52. The worm gear 52 extends through the hollow intermediate member 46 and is screwed at its inner end into a threaded portion 60 of an anchor element 62 held in place at the inner end of theitub ular member 12 as by a transversely disposed rivet pin 64., At either end of the hollow intermediate member 46 there is a radially inwardly projecting shoulder66 and 68 respectively. Justjinwardly of the shoulder 68 is'a' slot or groove 70 located circumferentially of the worm gear P te te v 95.

'as shown in Fig. 6.

52. Fitted in the slot is a radially disposed washer or disk 72 which has an opening 74 extending radially. The width of the opening is preferably slightly smaller than the root diameter of the groove 70 about the warm gear so that the disk 72 will snap in place about the groove "70. As seen in Figs. 3 and 6, the side of the hollow intermediate member 46 has an opening 76 to. permit inwhich may be mounted a sleeve type member when the transverse flanges 38 are in the retracted position shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In this retracted position the flanges 38 are below the outside peripheral surface of the tubular member 12. Thus, sleeve type bodies to be mounted on the tubular member 12 need only to he slid onto the tubular member 12 from the front end 14 toward the shoulder 30 as has been done with the body or housing 80 of a bipod 82 such as the bipod disclosed in my application No. 205,973,, filed January 15, 1951, now Patent No 2,807,904. After the sleeve type body 80 has been mounted onto the tubular member 12 as explained above,

it may be held in place between the shoulder 30 and flanges 38 by bringing the flanges 38 upwardly between the transverse guides 34 until they project above the v tubular member 12.

In the present instance the worm gear 52 has a right hand thread and therefore moving the flanges 38 upwardly is achieved by simply rotating the worm gear 52 'clockwise by means of the gripping web 58.

I Referring particularly to Fig. 1, it will be noted that clockwise rotation of the worm gear 52 causes it to move axially inwardly of the tubular member 12 because of the threads 60 in the anchor element 62.

This axial inward motion causes the disk 72 to move forward against the spring 78 through which this forward motion is yieldably transmitted to the hollow intermediate member 46 at the shoulder 66. This forward movement of the intermediate hollow member 46 results in a corresponding forward movement of the pivot pins 48. 'Because the gear teeth 50 are in engagement with the worm gear 52, the forward movement of the pivot pins will project above the outside peripheral surface of the tubular member 12 long before the transversely disposed cylindrical support shoulder 56 on the worm gear 52 reaches the flanges 38. By continuing to rotate the worm gear 52 clockwise, it will continue to move axially inwardly to further compress the spring 78 until the fcylin'drical support shoulder 56 is brought up pressurably against the flanges 38 and the ends of the projections 34 In the position shown in Fig. 6, the flanges 38 are locked in place to receive axial support from the cylindrical support shoulder 56 and rotary support from the guide projections 34. Thus, axial thrusts caused, as by sleeve type bodies 80 against the flanges 38 are absorbed by the support shoulder 56 and transmited through the worm gear 52, the anchor element 62 and rivet pin 64 to the walls of the tubular member 12.

None of the axial thrust will occur at the pivot pins 48. Also, if the body 80 is so dimensioned that it is tightly held between the shoulder 30 and flanges 38, rotary motion of the body 80 about the tubular member 12 will cause rotary turning moments at the flanges 38. .However, the flanges 38 being closely fitted between sertion of the disk 72 and of a spring '78 located about v the' worm gear 52 and compressed between the disk 72 and shoulder 66. a

, g In operation, the outside circumferential surface of the tubular member 12 provides a shaft or axle upon the transverse guiding surfaces 36 will thereby be prevented from rotating withsuch turning moments. A turning moment on the flanges 38 will be absorbed by the projections 34 without tending to rotate the worm gear 52 and so will have no effect upon the clamping efliciency of the support shoulder 56. Therefore, even a light finger tip tighening on the gripping web 58 is sufficient to withstand relatively heavy axial and rotary forces at the flanges 38 without loosening or impairing the supporting efficiency of the support shoulder 56 nor creating destructive stresses within the internal components of the mechanism.

In those instances where the housing or other body to be mounted on the tubular member 12 are dimensioned for a snug fit between the shoulder 30 and the projecting flanges 38, the small movement at the pivot pins 48 is a desirable feature. The reason is that when the retracted position as shown in Fig. 1, the movement of the flanges 38 is outwardly, increasing the distance between the flanges 38 and shoulder 30. Therefore, as the flanges expand or pivot to their projecting position they will not bind against the housing 80 which is dimensioned to reach out to the end 14 of the tubular member 12. Inthe'event that the housing 80 should extend over the end 14 a small distance, the present device is still applicable in that in such case the final expanding movement of the flanges 38 will be accomplished directly by the support shoulder 56 as it is screwed inwardly against the flanges 38.

It will also be noted that the arms 40 when in the retracted position meet at their edges 84. Also the end edges 86 of the arms 40 in this retracted position preferably abut against the end of the intermediate member 46. As a result, heavy counterclockwise rotary pressure on worm gear 52 will be taken up between the gear teeth 50, the edges '86 and 84 and none of this force will be transmitted to the pivot pins 48. Thus, the pivot pins 48 may beof small diameter with their strength not being a factor of great importance. 40

Bymaking the tubular member 12 with its gas cylinder plug 18 of such strong and poor heat conducting material as a titanium alloy, the rest of the components, except for the spring 46 which is preferably of spring steel,

in the gas cylinder plug adapter 10 may be made of aluminum alloy for conservation of weight. Because gases in the gas cylinder 24 come from exploded cartridges, they are at elevated temperatures causing the temperature of the gas cylinder 24 to rise even above 800 F. This is well above a temperature within which an aluminum laloy can be successfully used. However, because titanium is so poor a heat conductor and because aluminum is so relatively good a heat conductor, a high temperature gradient will exist in the walls of the titanium alloy component between the gas chamber and the aluminum alloy components. The titanium will in effect act as an insulator from the high temperatures in the gas cylinder 24 and permit the use of aluminum alloy not only for'the components within the tubular member 12 but also for the body 80 mounted on the tubular member 12. This construction, thereby, effectively achieves a desirable weight saving in mechanical accessories in hand portable weapons such as the shoulder 'rifle '26. The weight saving is effected primarily by single purpose of providing a closure for the end of the gas cylinder 24.

This invention is not limited to the particular construction shown as equivalents will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. For example, while the present embodiment is in the form of a gas cylinder plug adapter for a rifle, the invention may also be used on-shafts, axles and the like for holding sleeve type bodies thereon.

What is claimed is: V g 7 1; The combination of means for mountinga sleeve type body, said mounting means having a hollow tubular portion open at one end, transversely disposed guides fixed tojsaid tubular portion, oppositely disposed elements in the hollow of said tubular-portion; a shouldered each of said; elements slidably engaging said guides to move in said transverse direction, meansin the hollow of said tubular portion pivotally mounting said elements, means for moving said elements about said pivot means oppositely to each other 'in said transverse direction, whereby to c a y auses id sho l r to proj ab s mounting means in retaining relation with said body or retract into releasing relation with said body, and support means fixed to said last mentioned means for clamping said shoulders between said tubular portion and support means when said shoulder elements are in retaining relation with said body.

2. A gas cylinder plug adapter for mounting a sleeve type gun mount housing substantially as described comprising a hollow cylindrical mounting member open at one end, a gas cylinder plug'closure at the other end and a circumferentially disposed shoulder therebetween; guide means fixed to said open end for motion transverse to said cylindrical mounting member; expansible retaining elements, each having one end in guided relation to said guide means and extending radially at the open end of said cylindrical mounting member and the other end extending inwardly of said cylindrical mounting member; means in the hollow of said cylindrical member pivotally I carrying the other end of each of said retaining elements,

means for selectably expanding said retaining elements in said transverse direction about said pivots into retaining position of said housing between said shoulder and retaining elements or retracting said retaining elements into releasing position with respect to said housing; and support means for clamping the radially extending portion of each of said elements between the open end of said hollow cylindrical mounting member and support means when said elements are in said retaining position.

3. In a gas cylinder plug adapter for mounting a sleeve type gun mount housing comprising a hollow cylindrical mounting member open at one end with a gas cylinder plug closure at the other end and a circumferentially disposed shoulder therebetween, guide means fixed to said open end for motion transverse to said cylindrical mounting member, expansible retaining elements each having one end in guided relation with said guide means and extending radially at the open end of said cylindrical mounting member and the other end extending inwardly of said cylindrical member, means pivotally mounting the other end of each of said retaining elements, gear teeth on each of said expansible elements arcuately disposed about the pivotal mounting, worm gear means operatively engaging said gear teeth for selectably expanding said retaining elements in said transverse direction about said pivotal mounting into retaining position of said housing between said shoulder and retaining elements or retracting said retaining elements into releasing position with respect to said housing, and support means for clamping the radially extending portion of each of said retaining elements between said hollow cylindrical mounting member and said support means when said elements are in retaining relation with said housing.

4. A gas cylinder plug adapter for mounting a sleeve type gun mount housing substantially as described comprising a tubular mounting member of circular cross section having an opening at one end, a closure at the other end in the configuration of a gas cylinder plug and a circumferentially disposed shoulder therebetween, a

transversely disposed slot at the open end of said tubular member, two oppositely flanged elements extending from said open end inwardly of said tubular member with the flanges thereof being transverse to said tubular member and slidably carried in said slot, means pivotally mounting said flanged elements in said tubular member at a position distal from said open end, gear teeth on each of "said flanged elements arcuately disposed about the a pivotal mounting, a worm gear extending into said tubular'member operatively engaging said gear teeth, a sleeve fixed in'the closed end of said tubular mounting member'threadably engaging the inner end ofsaid worm. gear, a stop member on said worm gear disposed to engage said pivotal mounting means upon] movement of said worm gear in the direction of said open end thereby to move said mounting elements in the same direction, yieldable pressure means disposed to continually force said m'ount ing means in the opposite direction, and a support-and operating member at the other end of said worm gearfor manually rotating said worm gear and supporting the flanges of said flanged elements between said tubular member and support when said flanged elements protrude above the periphery of said tubular member.

5. An adapter as in claim 4 wherein said pressure means is a spring compressed between said stop member and pivotal mounting means.

6. In a device for mounting a sleeve type body, the combination of a tubular member having the hollow portion thereof open at one end, oppositely disposed arms in said tubular member, a transversely projecting element at said open end fixed to one end of each of said arms, guide means confining movement of said projecting elements to said transverse direction, a hollow sleeve in said tubular member at the other ends of said arms, a radially inwardly projecting shoulder at each end of said hollow sleeve and the shoulder nearest said arms having a transversely disposed slot supportably straddling said other end of each of said arms, a pivot pin perpendicular to said slot pivotally mounting each of said arms, gear teeth on each of said arms arcuately disposed about the respective pivot pin, a worm gear extending into said tubular member between said arms and through said hollow sleeve in operating engagement with said gear teeth and having a groove about its periphery positioned in the hollow of said hollow sleeve near said slottedshoulder, a threaded member screwed onto the inner end of said worm gear and anchored to said tubular member, a disk element projecting radially from said groove, a coil spring about said worm gear in the hollow of said sleeve and compressed between said disk element and other shoulder of. said sleeve, and a transversely disposed support and operating member at the other end of said worm gear for manually rotating said worm gear and supporting the projecting elements between said tubular member and support when the transverse projection of each of said projecting elements protrudes above said tubular member.

7. A device comprising a hollow housing open at one end, oppositely disposed projections on said housing at said end, a bushing comprised of at least two elements in the hollow of said housing, a flange on each of said bushing elements between said projections, a threaded member anchored in the hollow of said housing farthest from said open end, an intermediate element in the hollow of said housing between said threaded member and bushing, means pivotally mounting said bushing to said intermediate member, teeth on each of said bushing elements arcuately disposed about said pivot means, a screw engaging said arcuately disposed teeth and threaded member in said housing, an operating head on the end of said screw adjacent the flanges of said bushing, stop means on said screw restricting relative movement of said screw toward said open end with respect to said intermediate element, and resilient pressure means disposed to yieldably cause said relative movement.

8. A retracting flange device comprising a hollow housing open at one end, oppositely disposed projections on said housing at said end, a split bushing comprised of at least two axially-disposed elements in the hollow of said housing, aflange on each of said bushing elements between said propections, a threaded member anchored in --the hollow of said housing farthest from said openend, an

intermediate element in the hollow of said housing between said threaded member and said bushing, said bushing elements being pivotally carried by said intermediate element, teeth on said bushing elements arcuately dis- --posed about said respective pivots, a screw engaged in said :arcuately disposed teeth and threaded member in said .housing, a flange and operating head on the end of said ,-screw adjacent the flanges of said bushing elements, stop .means on said screw restricting relative movement of said ,screw toward said open end with respect to the intermediate element and a spring compressed between said stop means and intermediate member yieldably causing said "relative movement.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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US3178126 *15 Mar 196313 Apr 1965Clevite CorpChart tube retaining means for recorder
US3339857 *17 Nov 19645 Sep 1967Courtaulds LtdYarn collecting apparatus
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US6772972 *11 Jul 200210 Aug 2004Manufacturing Designs & SolutionsCone holder with tube end protectors
US7421815 *1 Dec 20069 Sep 2008Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Canting vertical fore grip with bipod
US7454858 *10 Feb 200425 Nov 2008R/M Equipment, Inc.Weapon grip assembly
US749042913 Jul 200617 Feb 2009Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Vertical fore grip with bipod
US7559167 *12 Oct 200714 Jul 2009Grip Pod Systems, LlcDual light rails and accessory rail mounts for vertical foregrips
US7568304 *11 Jan 20074 Aug 2009Grip Pod System, LlcLight rail and accessory rail mount for vertical fore grip
US757808924 Nov 200825 Aug 2009R/M Equipment, Inc.Weapon grip assembly
US7665239 *5 Jan 200723 Feb 2010Grip Pod Systems, L.L.C.Canting, tilting and rotating vertical fore grip
US766935730 May 20082 Mar 2010Grip Pod Systems, LlcRotating and canting vertical fore grip with bipod
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US78911264 Apr 200822 Feb 2011Grip Pod Systems, LlcCanting vertical fore grip with bipod
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US961197711 Mar 20164 Apr 2017Grip Pod Systems International, LlcVertical fore grip with bipod
US20060191183 *10 Feb 200431 Aug 2006Todd GriffinWeapon grip assembly
US20060277809 *13 Jul 200614 Dec 2006Moody Joseph RVertical fore grip with bipod
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Classifications
U.S. Classification403/299, 42/94, 242/597.3
International ClassificationF41A23/08, F41A23/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A23/08
European ClassificationF41A23/08