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Publication numberUS2682408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date29 Jun 1954
Filing date21 Mar 1952
Priority date21 Mar 1952
Publication numberUS 2682408 A, US 2682408A, US-A-2682408, US2682408 A, US2682408A
InventorsHenry J Warns, Jerome L Warns
Original AssigneeIndoor Golf Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game apparatus
US 2682408 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 29, 1954 J- L. WARNS ET AL 2,682,408

GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 21, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS JEROME L. WARNS AND HENRY J WARNS A T T O R N E Y S June 29, 1954 J. L. WARNS ETAL 2,682,408

GOLF GAME APPARATUS Filed March 21, 1952 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 A '9 I INVENTORS 33 I4 JEROME L. WARNS 3 2 l8 IO 7 7 AND HENRY J. WARNS ATT'ORNEYS June 1954 J. L. WARNS El'AL GOLF GAME APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 21, 1952 lll llllllllllllll ll-l llllllll lllll mmimu 0 ow ow 0: 20m.

| o t. 422 O ow F E m. 2.642

-INVENTORS JEROME L. WARNS AND HENRY J. WARNS mm mm Patented June 29, 1954 UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICE.

GOLF GAME APPARATUS Application March 21, 1952, Serial No. 277,752

13 Claims. 1

The herein disclosed invention relates to parlor games and particularly to a game simulating golf and has for an object to provide a game which will be interesting and fascinating to play and which will closely simulate the actual game.

Another object of the invention resides in providing a game by means of which several players may alternately take turns in playing.

A still further object of the invention resides in providing a game in which one game board is used divided into sections corresponding with the holes of a golf course and in which a single playing board may be used with any of the sections of the game board.

An object of the invention resides in providing a base having a standard issuing upwardly therefrom and formed with a journal and in rotatably mounting the game board on said journal and in constructing the sections segmental shaped and converging toward the axis of said journal and in further providing said sections with demarkations designating tees, greens, fairways and hazards.

Another object of the invention resides in arranging the playing board in overlying position relative to said game board and in journaling said playing board on said journal and in providing said playing board with a number of holes arranged in arcuate rows concentric with the axis of the journal and adapted to register with said tees, greens, fairways and hazards and serving as markers, the distances between said rows being a predetermined number of yards as measured on the game board in a radial direction.

A still further object of the invention resides in providing playing pieces having stems insertable into said holes, said playing pieces being movable over the playing board in accordance with the indications of a chance device.

Another object of the invention resides in utilizing a rotatable chance device and in providing a pivot mounted on said standard and on which said chance device may rotate.

A feature of the invention resides in the specific construction of the pivot means for the game board and playing board.

Other objects of the invention reside in the novel combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter illus trated and/or described.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a game illustrating an embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of the structure shown in'Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 1 with parts cut away to more clearly illustrate the invention and drawn to a greater scale than Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3 and drawn to a still greater scale.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of a portion of the playing board shown in Fig. 1 and illustrating the club and yardage chart, said view being drawn to a greater scale.

The construction shown in the drawings comprises a planiform base having a standard secured thereto and issuing upwardly therefrom. This standard is formed with a journal on which is pivoted a circular game board and a segmental shaped playing board. Between the base and game board and between the game board and playing board are spacers which hold the parts in spaced relation. The upper end of the standard is threaded to receive a nut which holds the parts in proper relation. The upper end of the threaded portion of the standard has a pivot formed thereon on which is rotatably mounted a rotatable chance device. The game board is divided into sections preferably 18 or 9 in number, correspond ing to the holes of a golf game, and each section is formed with demarkations indicating tees, greens, fairways and hazards. A number of holes are formed on the playing board corresponding with certain localities of the sections and are adapted to receive playing pieces movable with respect to said playing board in accordance with the operation of the chance device. The holes are arranged in arcuate rows concentric with the axis of the standard and the distance between. rows of holes is a number of yards measured radially along the playing surface of the game board. The playing board is made transparent so that the demarkations on the playing surface may be readily seen. A locking device serves to hold the playing board attached to the game board and in register with any of the various sections thereof. The entire game board and playing board may be rotated with reference to the base to present the playing board to any of a number of players seated about a table on which the game is used.

The invention comprises a base Hi constructed of any suitable board and of a sufilcient thickness to properly support the remainder of the game spaced relation to the surface of the table on which the game rests. The base it is preferably circular in form though the same may be of any desired shape. Extending upwardly from the base ND is a standard I l formed with a head it conical in shape. Adjacent the head is provided a 3 threaded shank E3. The said standard extends through the base it] and the head I2 is imbedded in the bottom of the base. A nut M is screwed down on the shank l3 and clamps the standard to the base. This nut is also recessed into the base. The standard is formed above the shank IS with a journal 5 and above said journal with a screw it of smaller diameter than the said journal and forming a shoulder ll therebetween.

Encircling the journal l5 of standard II is a spacer E3 in the form of a washer. Overlying the said washer and the base I is a game board i3 preferably circular in form and of the desired size. The game board I9 is constructed of a board similar to the base Hi. This game board is formed with an upper playing surface 20. The game board 53 is rotatably mounted on the journal l and rests on the spacer I8. The playing surface of the game board is divided into a number of segmental shaped sections 2|. The areas of these sections have demarkations 22 thereon forming on the sections tees 23, greens 24, fairways 25, and hazards 26. These fairways, greens and hazards may all be of diiferent configuration and. each of the sections may be different so that each hole played will have a different geographic appearance.

Overlying the game board i9 is a playing board 21. This playing board is segmental in shape and near the apex thereof is mounted for rotation on the journal l5. Between the playing board 21 and the game board I!) is a spacer 3'! in the form of a washer which encircles the journal l5 and which holds the playing board 25 above the game board IS in proper spaced relation. A nut 38 screwed upon the screw E6 of standard I holds the parts assembled. The playing board 2! is constructed of transparent material such as a transparent plastic whereby the contour of the playing surface 20 may be seen through the playing board. Formed on the playing board intermediate its lateral edges are a number of holes 28 which serve as markers and are arranged in arcuate rows concentric with the axis of the standard These rows are preferably spaced apart in a radial direction an even number of yards as measured on the playing surface 25, as for example, 10 yards. Playing pieces 29 have stems 30 which may be inserted into the holes 28. These stems 30 are preferably slightly tapered which aids directing the stems into the holes 28.

The playing board 21, as shown in 1, may be rotated with respect to the standard l2 so as to bring the central portion of the same having the markers 23 thereon opposite any of the sections 2! of the playing surface 20. In the particular form of the invention shown, 18 sections are shown each corresponding with one of the holes of a golf course. Inasmuch as the particular configuration of the demarkations on the game board may be varied to suit the individual, the entire configuration of the game board has not been shown but only that of two of the sections, and such demarkations are shown only in Fig. 3. On the playing board 2'! are mounted two cards 3! and 32 which may contain tables and directions for playing the game. A locking device 33 in the form of a screw is used for holding the playing board 21 in proper position with reference to the game board l9. This screw has a shank 48 which passes through a hole 34 in the playing board 21. The said shank is imbedded in a knob 35 by means of which the said screw may be rotated. Screw 33 is adapted to screw into holes 49 in the board IS. A pad 36 cemented to the bottom of the playing board 21 and of the same thickness as the spacer 31 and encircling the shank 48 holds the playing board 21 in proper spaced position above the game board I9.

For determining the movement of the playing pieces a rotatable chance device 39 is employed which is shown in detail in Fig. 4. This chance device consists of a circular disc 40 having a hub 4| at the center and a flange 42 at its periphery inclining downwardly from the disc. The hub 4| is in the form of a knob and serves as a means whereby the chance device may be rotated. Within the hub 4| is formed a conical depression 43. A stem 44 is secured to the upper end of the screw I6 and has mounted on it a ball 45. This ball is received in the depression 43 and serves as a pivot for the chance device. Indicia 45 on the flange 42 of the chance device 39 are adapted to register with an arrow 41 on the playing board 21. When the chance device 39 is rotated one of the indicia stops opposite the arrow 41 and indicates the movements of the playing pieces.

In the playing of the game rules may be chosen and any desired method of determining the movement of the playing pieces may be chosen. As an example, a chart such as indicated at in Fig. 5 may be employed. This chart is printed on the card 3|. This chart has a number of columns 5| headed by a number from 1 to 11, inclusive. These numbers correspond to golf clubs and the particular column is also headed by the description of the corresponding club. Below the club notation are numbers indicated by the reference character 52. These numbers indicate the minimum and maximum number of yards which can be played in the game with the particular club designated. Below the numbers 52 of each column appear the letters C, D" and F. These letters stand for direction of play, namely, cross play, diagonal play and forward play. Above and below these letters are markers 53 and 54 and in which suitable pegs similar to the playing pieces 29 may be inserted. In addition, another column indicated at 55 is employed which is headed by the notation Club and range. In the row containing the markers 53 and 54 and in column 55 is found the notation Slice opposite marker 53 and Hook opposite markers 54. All of the columns are divided into 18 rows 56 and in the column 55 appear the numbers l to 18, inclusive, to correspond with each row. These numbers correspond to the indicia 46 on the chance device 39. In each of the spaces formed by the rows 56 and columns 5| appear one or two groups of numbers. In the column for the No. 1 club or driver the numbers "200-10 appear in the first row. The first of these numbers indicates the number of yards the playing piece is to be moved in the direction chosen, while the second number indicates the number of yards the playing piece is to be moved to the right or left (slice or hook) To start the game the player places the playing board over the section on which hole I is positioned and rotates the game board till the playing board is in front of him. He then places a peg in one of the markers 53 01' 54, choosing the club he wishes to play and at the same time designates whether he will play a slice or a hook and in what direction he will drive. If the fairway is long and the hole to the left, he may choose the marker above F in the first column. He then spins the chance device 39. If the same stops with the numeral 14 opposite arrow 41 he runs down column 55 till he reaches this numeral. He then traces across the row corresponding therewith till he reaches the first column. In this column he will find the numbers 280-30. This means that he will move forward 280 yards and to the right 30 yards. As previously stated, the distance between the markers 28 will be a predetermined number of yards. In the game illustrated the distance between the first four rows of holes represent 50 yards while the distance between the succeeding rows represent yards. The player then counts off the yardage on the playing board 2'! in both a forward direction and toward the right and sets a playing piece in the appropriate marker 23. The game board is then rotated to present the playing board to the next player. He proceeds in like manner. The playing then continues until the players have holed out, after which the playing board is moved to the next section of the game board. To render the game more realistic, rules may be provided and applied to the card 32 which determine penalties for out of bounds shots and other irregular shots. One set of such rules are as follows, though it can be readily comprehended that the rules may be varied to suit the individual:

Rules and penalties Sandtraps.-Use No. 8 club;

Water.-Penalty one stroke. last position.

Woods.Penalty one stroke. Move ball to first hole outside of area marked Woods in a lateral direction.

Rough.Deduct 30 yards from next shot. Deduct the 30 yards from the forward motion. The hook and slice remain the same.

RolZs.-On the areas marked Roll move the ball down the roll on a straight line to the first hole on the level.

Special wood section-l. Player follows the wood penalty. 2. Or uses the wood penalty club, 9 iron.

Heavy rough. -Player must use the rough penalty club, 7 iron.

Lost ball, in small red circles-Player has lost the ball, penalty one stroke play the ball from nearest hole outside red penalty area.

Out of bounds.l. On the sideswhen player has shot beyond the edge of the playboard on Shoot over from heavy either side he places ball on the last hole at edge of field where ball went out. 2. At the far end of bcardplayer loses one stroke and shoots over from his last position.

Two players on same hole-J1? two players land on the same position on the field the second player is penalized one stroke and moves his ball to the hole directly behind the first players ball.

Stymie.If a player hits or crosses a hole occupied by another player while in the course of putting, his putt is nullified, and he places his ball in the hole directly behind the ball where the infraction occurred and shoots again, thereby costing himself one stroke If a player finds himself stymied, i. e. another ball occupying a hole between his ball and the pin, he must shoot around that ball or take a stymie penalty.

Hitting the pin.If a player hits the pin on the green with a shot which is more than 100 yards away, he has not holed the ball, but takes instead a two shot penalty and he places his ball on the hole next to the pin. In match play-loss of hole. On shots less than 100 yards, it is not a penalty, and the player holes the ball.

Hitting a player.-If a player lands on a hole where there is a figure of a golfer or a caddie, he incurs a one-stroke penalty and plays the ball from that hole.

The advantages of the invention are manifest. Any one of the players within the limits of a number of markers on the playing board may play and alternately take turns playing. The full 18 holes may be provided so that full interest is maintained in the playing of the game. The demarkations on the game board may be made most realistic so that a close simulation of the real game is procured. With the invention all of the hazards encountered inthe actual playing of golf may be simulated in the play. The playing board is readily shifted with reference to the game board to change the section being played. The game is relatively flat and can be constructed without appreciable height. If desired, the game can be incorporated into and made part of an ordinary card table, the card table constituting the base of the invention.

Changes in the specific form of the invention, as herein described, may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is:

1. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sec tions converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairtions having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a transparent playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board reg istrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which playing pieces are to be played.

3. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a transparent playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, holes in said playing board and serving as markers registrable with divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, locking means for retaining said playing board in fixed relation with any of said sections, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance evice for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

5. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a transparent playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, holes in said playing board and serving as markers registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, said holes being arranged in arcuate rows concentric with reference to said center, the distance between said rows representing a predetermined number of yards measured on said sections in a radial direction, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

6. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, holes in said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces having stems insertable into said holes and shouders engageable with the face of said playing board and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

7. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a rotatable chance device having its axis at the locality of said center for determining the particular markers at which said playing pieces are to be placed.

8. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a playing board overlying said game board, a standard extending through said game board at said center and serving as pivot means for supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a rotatable chance device pivoted on said standard for determining the particular markers at which said playing pieces are to be placed.

9. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a base, a standard secured to said base and extending upwardly therefrom and through said game board at the center thereof, a playing board overlying said game board, said standard extending through said playing board and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

10. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a base, a standard secured to said base and extending upwardly therefrom and through said game board at the center thereof, a playing board overlying said game board, said standard extending through said playing board and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said green, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a rotational chance device mounted for rotation on said standard for determining the particular markers at which said playing pieces are to be played.

11. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a planiform base, a standard extending through said base, said standard having a head imbedded into the underside of the base and a threaded shank and clamping the standard to said base, said standard being formed with a journal above said base, a playing board overlying said game board, said journal extending through said game board and through said playing board and journaling said boards for rotation relative to one another and to said base, a spacer between said base and game board, a spacer between said game board and said playing board, a screw on the end of said journal, a nut screwed on said screw and holding the parts in assembled. relation, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain ortions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual. playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

12. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having dcmarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway and hazards, a planiform base, a standard extending through said base, said standard having a head imbedded into the underside of the base and a threaded shank extending through said base, a nut screwed on said threaded shank and clamping the standard to said base, said standard being formed with a journal above said base, a playing board overlying said game board, said journal extending through said game board and through said playing board and journaling said boards for rotation relative to one another and to said base, a spacer between said base and game board, a spacer between said game board and said playing board, a screw on the end of said journal, a nut screwed on said screw and holding the parts in assembled relation, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers, a pivot formed on the end of said screw and a 1'0- tatable chance device pivoted on said pivot for determining the particular markers at which said playing pieces are to be placed.

13. In a game simulating golf, a game board divided into a number of segmental shaped sections converging to a common center, each of said sections having demarkations thereon designating a tee, a green, a fairway andlhazards, 25

said tee being disposed near the apex of the section and said green near the circumference thereof, a playing board overlying said game board, pivot means situated at said center and supporting said playing board for rotation relative to said game board, markers on said playing board registrable with said tees and certain portions of said greens, fairways and hazards, individual playing pieces placeable at said markers and a chance device for determining the particular markers at which the playing pieces are to be played.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 599,452 Mitchell Feb. 22, 1898 811,347 Whitlatch Jan. 30, 1906 2,180,049 Hall Nov. 14, 1939 2,521,775 Brower Sept. 12, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 322,221 Great Britain Mar. 25, 1929

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US599452 *28 Sep 189722 Feb 1898 Half to william hooper
US811347 *25 Nov 190430 Jan 1906Marshall WhitlatchIndoor-golf game apparatus.
US2180049 *8 Dec 193714 Nov 1939Hall Arthur HenryBoard game apparatus
US2521775 *26 Dec 194512 Sep 1950Orson Brower ElbertWord game apparatus
GB322221A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2839303 *4 Nov 195517 Jun 1958Baker David SGame apparatus with rotatable marble transporting discs
US3117791 *18 Aug 196014 Jan 1964Milo J KoubaBowling game device
US4010956 *16 Jan 19768 Mar 1977said Gregory J. ZylaDrag racing game apparatus
US4624464 *17 Feb 198425 Nov 1986Western Publishing Company, Inc.Game turntable
US4759548 *18 Feb 198726 Jul 1988Chaban Joseph MRealistic golf-simulating board game
US7093832 *9 Aug 200122 Aug 2006Subject Matters, LlcConversation generator
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/245, 273/280, 273/282.1, 273/142.00R
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0628
European ClassificationA63F7/06A9