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Publication numberUS2658168 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date3 Nov 1953
Filing date29 Apr 1950
Priority date29 Apr 1950
Publication numberUS 2658168 A, US 2658168A, US-A-2658168, US2658168 A, US2658168A
InventorsLeroy A Matson
Original AssigneeSydney M Roth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Votive light system
US 2658168 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1953 A. MATSON 2,658,168

VOTIVE LIGHT SYSTEM 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 29, 1950 Nov. 3, 1953 L. A. MATSON VOTIVE LIGHT SYSTEM 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 29, 1950 Hui-FUNK Nov. 3, 1953 A. MATSON VOTIVE LIGHT SYSTEM 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 MNEHPUHNH Qm rflll L] Filed April 29, 1950 bpll/aver/aw Patented Nov. 3, 1953 VOTIVE LIGHT SYSTEM Leroy A. Matson, Park Ridge, 111., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Sydney M. Roth, Chi

cago, Ill.

Application April 29, 1950, Serial N 0. 159,050

Claims.

Th s i nt on r ates. to a vot ve l ht sy te d o e a i ularly to a vot ve i h syst m of e c r cal yp and m ans for automati ont o of cer ain desir d o er t s n. s c a system.

Stands holding a number of candles for relius nd sac ificial purpo s a e of ou been used for centuries, and more recently electric votive lights and stands therefor have come into use and have received considerable favor. Such votive light stands can be given the same appearance and all of the religious connotations of the former types using an open flame, but with the elimination of grease and smoke and the cleaning and filling of glasses, the practically complete elimination of any fire hazard, and a very great reduction maintenance.

The electric votive light systems previously used, insofar as they are known to applicant, have had a number of disadvantages which are here being eliminated and overcome by the improved and more fully automatic systems hereafter disclosed.

One feature of my improved systems is that a Single coin-operated actuating switch is enabled to eiTect energization of the votive lights in a predetermined desired sequence upon successive operations of such a switch; another feature of this invention is that all, or a. desired number, of the lights previously energized are maintained energized upon further successive operations of the coin switch; yet another feature of this invention is the provision of means for automatically deenergizing any desired number of lights from one to all of the lights upon .energization of a given light, as a succeeding light in a group or the last light of a group; a further feature of this invention is that a predetermined time interval (up to many hours if desired) can be provided before the lights are automatically deenergized; and yet a further feature of this invention is that manual deenergization of the lights can be COnVenientIyefiected when desired.

Other features, and advantages in my system will be apparent from the following specification and drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view, from the left and back, of one form of apparatus embodying my invention;

Figure 2 is a view of the device shown in Figure 1 from the left of such figure and that side removed;

Figure 3 is a combined schematic andl ircuit diagram of one type of circuit which I have d l d or e n su h pp atus; and

Figure 4 is a similar diagram of another and simplified arrangement.

The votive light system which I am here disclosing provides he advantages I desire in the way of a single coin operated actuating switch, automatic deenergization of lights when desired, and the like, yet does this in a manner which enables my invention to be embodied in several alternative forms. These variations not only meet substantial differences in the number of votive lights to be controlled, but also individual preference as to the manner in which the votive lights are to be energized and deenergized auto: matically. My fully automatic system can be used in quite simplified form for a relatively small number of lights or embodied in a form adapted to handle a large number of votivelights, as for example from 4 0, 50 or even such lightsand to provide any desired length of time after energization of all of a certain number of the lights before any lights are deenergized.

When I speak of votive lights throughout the specification and claims of this application, it will be understood that I am referring to the type of light usually used for religious or sacrificial purposes, and am using the term votive light in a broad sense to cover any such lights, even though these sometimes have other terms applied thereto, as vigil lights. It is my intent that the termv votive light cover any type of light illuminated for religious purposes such as prayer, remembrance, sacrifice, or the like, regardless of the length of time they may be caused to burn and whether or not they might sometimes be called votive lights in their longer burning form, iiligil lights in a shorter burning form, and the In the particular embodiment of my invention illustrated herewith, a stand of conventional construction, but shown without ornamentation for simplicity of illustration, is shown as having sides It and H and a bottom vl2 all supported by suitable legs I 3; andas having its front portion arranged in stepped tiers I l, 15 and Hi. The particular stand illustrated has three such tiers with seven lights being shown on each tier, but it will be understood that this is for purposes of illustration only of one of the smaller sizes of votive light. stands conventionally used, and that my nvention is equally applicable to stands of 40,50 or 100 lights. The lights on each tier are identical. The light I1, for example, is illustrated as consisting of the conventional red glass ll having therein an electrically energized light H", which may simulate a candle in appearance.

The control equipment comprising the operative portion of my votive light system is preferably contained in a single removable unit or cabinet here identified in general as l8, facilitating installation and servicing. This unit would be connected to a conventional power supply as 110 volts A. C. by a conventional two wire cord here identified as 19, and would have receptacles adapted to receive cable plugs of the cables identified as 23, 2| and 22. These last mentioned cables (one for each tier of lights) would involve one more wire than the number of lights in each row, eight wires in this case, and would be permanently wired to the sockets of the votive lights on each of the various tiers of the stand. The plug connections, however, enable ready removal of the trol mechanisms. A single coin slot 23 is here shown as near the center of the middle tier, although it will be understood that it can be located at any convenient position; and it is connected by a coin chute 25 to an opening in the top of the unit it. A coin deposited in the slot 23 passes through the chute 24 and through a coin passageway in the unit (operating a coin controlled actuating switch in so doing) to then pass out of the bottom of the unit l8 through a chute here identified as 25 to any convenient coin receptacle here shown as the locked box 26 immediately under the bottom of the stand.

Referring now more particularly to Figure 3, I will describe a control and operating arrangement of a kind adapted to be housed in the cabinet or unit l8. In order to provide a diagram of a character which could be illustrated on a single sheet, the diagram of Figure 3 shows an arrangement energizin only two banks of seven lights each, but it will be understood that each bank or tier could contain a larger number of lights and that there could be three 01' any desired number of such tiers of lights, merely by the provision of a larger number of contacts on each stepping switch, and further stepping switches if desired.

Referring now to Figure 3, a pair of wires I9a. and lSb provide the source of power, as for example 110 volts for energizing the apparatus. This is utilized directly to energize the lamps in the particular embodiment illustrated as will be apparent more particularly in later portions of the description; and is converted to a type of power appropriate to energize the stepping relays, as by being reduced to 12 volts direct current by the rectifier 30. One side of this D. C. output is passed through a wire 3| to one side of the normally open contacts in the coin switch 32. This may be any conventional commercial type, the contacts being adapted to be momentarily closed by a coin. When these contacts are closed the circuit continues through the wire 33, through the normally closed contacts 340, and 34b of a single pole double-throw relay, and through the wire 35 to the actuating coil 36 of the steppin relay, whence the circuit is completed through the wires 31 and 38 back to the other side of the rectifier. This momentary energization of the actuating coil 36 pulls the movable armature 39 to the right (as illustrated in Figure 3) against the pull of the spring 40, and the moment the circuit is deenergized by opening of the coil switch contacts after passage of the coin therethrough the spring pulls the armature back to the left and rotates the ratchet wheel 4| one step. As illustrated in the drawings, because of the location of the actuating coil, this rotaunit 18 with its con 4 tion is counterclockwise; but it will be under stood that the shaft connecting this ratchet wheel to the movable contact arrangements of the stepping switch proceeds out of the face of the ratchet wheel 41 as viewed in Figure 3 and into the face of the rotatable members 42 and 43 of the two contact sections, so that these rtate clockwise as viewed in Figure 3.

Referring now to the lightoperating portionof the stepping switch, it will be seen that this comprises contacts 44a to 449 adapted to be contacted by the rotary contact completing member 42, the arrangement being such that if opera-' tion of the stepping switch by a coin moves the rotary member of a circle in the example illustrated so that one contact at a time is successively completed, upon the first coin effected operation of the actuating switch 32 the stepping relay moves one step to bring the contacting member 42 into engagement with the contact 44a. This completes a circuit directly from the 110 volt source through the wire 41, the contacting member 42, the contact 44a, the light Ila and the common return wires 48 and 49 to the other side of the power source, thus energizing the lamp Ila.

Upon successive operations of the coin switch and consequent stepping movements of the stepping relay, contacts 442), 440, etc. would be successively engaged by the movable contacting member 42 to energize the lights llb, llc, etc. It is to be noted that during the successive illumination of lights in predetermined sequence, the lights previously energized are maintained energized by the continued contact of other portions of the contacting member 42. While this is illustrated for convenience as a single substantially semi-circular contact member, it will be understood that it can equally well be a plurality of individual contact figures. In any case successive operations illuminate further lights in a predetermined sequence so that each coin de-. posited by a worshipper effects illumination of a votive light, but at the same time lights ener-. gized only a short time before do not go off but are maintained lit.

In the particular form illustrated, the contact. 44g which completes the circuit to the last light. on the top tier, for examples, also completes a circuit through the wire 50 to the energizing coil 34d. of the previously mentioned relay, causing the normally closed contacts 34a and 34b to be opened and causin closure of the contacts 34a and 340. After this change in the relay is effected further operations of the coin switch 32 complete a circuit through the wire "5| energizing the actuating coil 56 of another stepping switch. This switch includes an armature 59, spring 60, ratchet wheel 6!, and contacting member 62 analagous to parts of the other stepping switch, identified by reference numerals 20 higher in each case so that the detailed description will not be repeated. The deposit of further coins thus leaves the first row of lights illuminated and successively illuminates or energizes lights in the second row, the first coin stepping the switch once to bring the contacting member 62 into engagement with the contact 64a to illuminate the light Ila, the next operation of the coin switch effecting energization of the next successive light while maintaining the circuit to the first light of this row, etc.

It will be understood that another stepping switch could take care of the third row and be brought into operation by another relay similarto the relays4 and actuated upon completion of the last contact 640. It will also be understood, of course, that there could equally well be a larger number of lights in each row, as twenty lights, needing only a stepping switch with twenty contacts; or -that a single twenty contact stepping switch could be used to actuate two rows of ten lights each followed by anotherstepping switch coacting' two more rows of ten lights each, etc.

After all or a given number of thelights in a. votive stand have been illuminated, I- desire to provide for automatically deenergizing all of the lights after a desired period of=burning. An arrangement for deenergizingall oi'the lights after illumination of the last light is illustrated in Figure 3, and particularly the right hand portion thereof. When the contacting member 62 finally reaches the contact My (assuming for purposes of simple illustration that this is the last light on the votive stand), a circuit is completed through the wire 10 to the actuating coil H of a single-throw, double-pole relay causing the movable contacts H and Nb (normally open) to come into engagement with the fixed contacts He and Hal. A circuit is then completed from one side of the 110 volt source through the contacts 12a and 12b (which would beclosed at this time by virtue of the cam follower being in the lower portion of the cam 13), and through the contacts Nb and lid to energize the timer motor 14, the shaft carrying the cams l3 and 15 being gear driven by this motor in such a way as to make one revolution in four hours, for example, or any other given desired time which hasbeen predeterrninedby selection of the gear ratio, or which may be changed by altering the ratio.

The cams are shown in a position near the end o f this period, just beforehomingoperation of the stepping switches is to be efieeted to deenerg-ize all of the lights, It will be noted that after the timing motorhas run for a very short period the raised portion of the cam 13 (rotating clockwise as illustrated) comes into action and causes the contact 120. to leave the contact 12?) and close'with the contact 120, thus keeping the timing motor in operation regardless of the setting of the relay H. Just before the lower portion of the cam 73' is again reached (which would reopen the'contacts 12b and 720- illustrated as elosed in the drawing) the raised portion on the cam lswould close the normally. open contacts Ha and 1Tb. This results. in 12 voltcur- :rent from the rectifier-passing through the wire 3| and being deliveredthrough the wire 18- to 'thecontacts 45a to 4.5? on the homingsection -o f-the stepping switch illustrated inthe upper portion of the drawing, and 65a to 55f in the other stepping switch. Since the contacting members 43 and 63 in the homing. portions of these switches (being mounted on thexsame shaft as the other contacting members in each case) WOllld'thGll be in a positionl80 from that illustrated in the drawin andincontact with all of the contacts, homing actuation would'take place.

Since this operation is. identical in both .switches only one need'be described. Referring to the switch in the upper-portion of thedraw- 'ing it will be seen that current is-then delivered from'the contacting. member43 through the wire '19 1 andthe normally closed contacts 80a, 80b to the actuating coil 38: Currentfiow through this coil moves the armature 39- .to "the right breaking the-circuit and" allowing vthespring to eflect a step of movement o'tthe ratchet wheelll; Hgm ever, as soon as the armature 39. moves; to; the left to the position illustratedin the drawings; the contacts c and filllz. are. again closed, and since all but one of thevcontacts inthe homine portion of the switch are still engaged: by the contacting member 43;, another homing stepim: mediately takes place; These homingstepsthus take place repeatedlyin very rapid sequence, so. that the switch parts are returned. to the 110.51: tion illustrated in the'drawing in a. very short period of time, usuallyasecond'or'two, pines the. last contact is not. connected, the homing; operation stops and nofurther movement; of the stepping switch parts takesplace whenthe con: tacting members thereof haveassumed theposition shown in the drawings.

The votive light. stand; is.v then ready for use again, and it. will be apparent that ii. there-are several such stands one would normally always be available for a person who desiredto use; the same. Meanwhile, thestepping operation: has caused deenergization of: the relay H and: when the cam 13 has moved a few degrees further opening of the contacts 12a and. opensthe circuit of the timing motor 14 and leavesthe timing portion of the system inoperative. and deenergizedv until all of the,- votivev lights, have again been illuminated one byone by. successive operations of the coin switch.

Under certain circumstances, however, it. may be desirable to be able to .efiect .deenergization of all of the lamps manually atan earlierlor. later time than would otherwise-be normal, and. the system illustrated also makesproyision. for this. If the manual switch v82::is thrownv from. the normal position. illustratedrtoz its other contact, the timer is out: of circuit. Under-.such:.cireum.- stances, I prefer'tohavea pilot. light 83;illumiihated to call attentiorrto the .inoperativenessnf the timer. Manual'deenergization .of the lamps can then be effected. atanytimedesired, longer or shorter than the period proyidedby. the .timer, by closure of the-manuallswitch (as apushbuts ton) comprising the, contacts 184a and 84b,'. this having the same homing efiecton thestepping switches as automatic :olosurelofzthe contacts 11a. and. 11b.

Moreover, if the switch :82: is .in the normal position illustrated. .in. the drawings, the lights can be cleared earlier thanwouldbe normal by manual closure ofrthe contacts :84a and -Bfib, the timer. then running. .through itscycle of operation without, effect on :the system until the deenergizing contact 9111a and 11b are closed, whereupon 'deenerg-ization. .of all. lights that: illuminated would. take place. 'Because-ofthis latter action, I .preferto cut the timer out of circuit by operationv of::the .switch--82.-at any gime there .is to be'manual control of illumina- It-will also be .understood1thatwhere there are a plurality of stepping. switches, deenergization of lights controlled by oneisuch switch can be effected by closure. of -"the last: contact-on another switch, rather than by' useiof a timer. That is, if the votive light;stand contains -two rowsof seven lights, as illustrateddn -Eigure -3'-'for sim plicity, the homing control circuit forthe upper stepping switch couldi'becompleted through a circuit including thecontact 649 andtheeentacts 34b and 34c, being arrangedtodeenergize the relay 34 upon completionoi homing of the -when"all ping' of the coin which effected energization of the last light in the second low would also eifect clearing or deenergization of all lights in the first row, whereupon the dropping of the next coin would re-illuminate light No. 1 in the first row, the next coin would illuminate light No. 2 in the first row, etc. At the completion of illumination of all lights in the first row, energization of the last light could similarly effect clearing of the lower stepping switch and the lights controlled thereby, the relay 34 in such case preferably being of a time delay type enabling this to take place before the contacts moved over to render the second stepping switch operative upon further operations of the coin switch.

Referring now more particularly to Figure 4, a simplified version of my system is illustrated, this form embodying my invention in a manner particularly suitable to a votive light stand used relatively infrequently. The line wires H911 and 9b provide power to energize the lights here shown for simplicity as constituting two rows of six lights each, although it will be understood that a different number in each row and a greater number of rows may be used if desired. In this case a very simple stepping switch may be used, with no need of any homing arrangement. Actuation of the coin switch I32 completes a circuit from the rectifier I30 through the wires l3l, I33, and L3! to effect a downward movement of the armature member I39, and a step of movement of the ratchet wheel Ml, reference numbers 100 higher than corresponding parts being used so that complete detail of description need not be repeated here. In the particular form illustrated, the multi-fingered movable contacting member I42 is illustrated as having seven contact fingers, although it will be understood that any appropriate number may be used, and as moving on a contact member having twelve contacts 144a, etc.

In this form of device as illustrated, seven of the lights will always be illuminated. In the particular position of the parts shown lights 6 to 12 inclusive are energized, and the next operation of the coin switch causes energization of light No. 1 while maintaining lights '7 to 12, inclusive, lit; but at the same time causes deenergization of light No. 6. Similarly, the next operation of the coin switch I32 effects illumination of light No. 2 by engaging contact M412 and maintains energization of lights 8 to 12 and light No. 1, but deenergizes light No. '7. Accordingly, each person dropping a coin would have his votive light illuminated for the length of time involved before seven further coin operations have taken place. This maintains the par- ;ticular light illuminated, under normal conditions, during the length of time that the person .originally causing its illumination remains in the .church or other location of the votive light stand.

While I have shown and described certain embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Votive light actuating apparatus, includ- .ing: a single actuating switch; means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch,

one light for each said operation; and means for maintaining energized at least several of the 75 8 i previously energized lights upon successive operations of said actuating switch, the lights remaining energized for a period of time independent of the time when lit.

2. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single actuating switch; means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation; and means for maintaining energized at least several of the previously energized lights upon successive operations of said actuating switch and, upon energization of a certain light, for effecting deenergization of at least a certain previously energized and maintained light.

3. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single actuating switch; means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation; means for maintaining energized at least several of the previously energized lights upon successive operations of said actuating switch; and means actuated upon energization of a certain light for effecting deenergization of a plurality of the previously energized and maintained lights.

4. Apparatus of the character claimed in claim 3 wherein the last mentioned means includes a timer for efiecting deenergization at a predetermined time interval after energization of said certain light.

5. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single coin-operated actuating switch; and a stepping switch with initial and following conta-cting means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation, and for maintaining energized all of the previously energized lights in a predetermined group upon successive operations of said actuating switch, the lights remaining energized for a period of time independent of the time when lit.

6. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single coin-operated actuating switch; a stepping switch with initial and following contacting means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation, and for maintaining energized all of the previously energized lights in a predetermined group upon successive operations of said actuating switch; and means including a timer actuated upon energization of the last light of a predetermined group for effecting deenergization of the entire group of lights at a predetermined time interval after energization of said last light.

7. Votive light actuating apparatus, including:

. a single coin-operated actuating switch; a stepping switch with initial and following contacting means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation, and for maintaining energized at least some of the previously energized lights upon successive operations of said actuating switch; a second similar stepping switch connected to a second group of lights; and means actuated upon energization of the last light of the group connected to the first stepping switch for causing the coinoperated switch to thereafter actuate the second stepping switch, at least some of the lights in both groups remaining energized for a period of time independent of the time when lit.

8. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single coin-operated actuating switch; a stepping switch with initial and following contacting means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation, and for maintaining energized all of the previously energized lights upon successive operations of said actuating switch; a second similar stepping switch connected to a second group of lights; means actuated upon energization of the last light of the group connected to the first stepping switch for causing the coin-operated switch to thereafter actuate the second stepping switch; and means including a timer actuated upon energization of the last light of a predetermined group for elfecting deenergization of all of the lights at a predetermined time interval after energization of said last light.

9. Apparatus of the character claimed in claim 8 including manually operated switch means for also effecting deenergization of all of the lights.

10. Votive light actuating apparatus, including: a single coin-operated actuating switch; and a stepping switch with initial and following contacting means for energizing said votive lights in a desired sequence upon repeated operation of said actuating switch, one light for each said operation, and for maintaining energized all of the previously energized lights in a predetermined group upon successive operations of said actuating switch, the total number of contacting means being less than the number of lights and contacts therefore.

LEROY A. MATSON.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,775,480 Gould Sept. 9, 1930 1,823,000 Priori Sept. 15, 1931 1,999,810 Hershey Apr. 30, 1935 2,034,744 Campagna Mar. 24, 1936 2,200,456 Shultz May 14, 1940

Patent Citations
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US1823000 *9 Dec 192915 Sep 1931Priori MarinoIlluminable votive device
US1999810 *10 Jun 193230 Apr 1935Associated Electric Lab IncIndicating system
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2863547 *14 Jun 19549 Dec 1958Charles G CavalleriCoin operated intermittent lighting device-automatic electric candle
US2994804 *17 Jun 19571 Aug 1961 Lighting control system
US3274441 *9 Oct 196120 Sep 1966Fedor BenedikSequential electrical lighting arrangement
US3355627 *6 Jul 196528 Nov 1967Lester E KronSequentially energized electric sign apparatus
US3456771 *24 Feb 196722 Jul 1969Landenberger EugenApparatus for displaying information,particularly for exhibiting advertisements
US4225030 *18 Oct 197830 Sep 1980Kilman Jr Lowell EAutomatic indicator for a game
US4617614 *16 Sep 198514 Oct 1986Gabor LedererElectric light fixture
US4835663 *18 Nov 198630 May 1989Noel Christopher KavanaghLiquid fuel consuming apparatus
US5124903 *21 Oct 199123 Jun 1992Coviello Debra SDecorative light display unit
US20120150675 *14 Nov 201114 Jun 2012Gabor LedererSystem for the commercialization of electronic candle illumination
WO2003084375A1 *4 Apr 200216 Oct 2003Sauza Jose Joaquin UribeCoin-operated sound-producing time-controlled candle system and method for the production of said candle
Classifications
U.S. Classification315/319, 315/363, 315/360, 315/362, 194/222, 362/249.12, 362/810
International ClassificationA47G33/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G33/00, Y10S362/81
European ClassificationA47G33/00