Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2611529 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date23 Sep 1952
Filing date27 Oct 1948
Priority date27 Oct 1948
Publication numberUS 2611529 A, US 2611529A, US-A-2611529, US2611529 A, US2611529A
InventorsCurrivan John F
Original AssigneeCurrivan John F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Integral carton for protection of fragile articles
US 2611529 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1952 J. F. CURRIVAN INTEGRAL CARTON FOR PROTECTION OF FRAGILE ARTICLES File d Oct. 27, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet l FIE- I N VEN TOR.

Sept. 23, 1952 J..F. CURRIVAN 2,611,529

INTEGRAL CARTON FOR PROTECTION OF FRAGILE ARTICLES Filed Oct. 27, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

Patented Sept. 23, 1952 UNITED srAlrss ra'rg OFFICE INTEGRAL CARTON FOR PROTECTION OF FRAGILE ARTIGLES I John F. Currivan, Dayton, Qhio Application October 27, 1948, SerialNo. 56,736

The object of the present invention is to provide an inexpensive integral carton construction, affording protection for fragile articles, as, for example, radio tubes, such protection heretofore having required tubes of corrugated board to encircle such fragile articles in cartons.

A further object is to enable the packing of tubes of various diameters in one size cartons.

A further object of the invention is to provide such an integral carton construction, adequately protecting the fragile articles and yet of such form that the carton can be successfully erected, loaded and both ends closed by conventional automatic cartoning machines.

The invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a closed carton embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a transverse section through the structure of Fig. '1 on the line 2-2.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2, showing the use of a modified form of carton 'blank,-which is shown in Fig. 9.

Fig. 4. is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing the use of the carton blank illustrated in Fig. 8.

Fig. 5 illustrates a carton blank as erected in Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a vertical section on the line 66, Fig. 2.

Fig. 7 shows the carton blank used in the structure of Fig. 10.

Fig. 8 shows the carton blank illustrated in Fig. 4.

Figure 9 shows the carton blank shown erected in Figure 3.

Figure 10 is a transverse sectional view of a carton erected from the blank of Figure 7.

Referring to the drawings and to the carton blank'o'f Fig. 5, it will be seen by-reference to Fig. 2 that when the blank is erected, it will provide an inner-partition l adapted to separate two fragile articles 2*, as shown in Fig. 2, or to receive single fragile articles, such as radio tubes, of various diameters, because of the flexibility of the inner flap partition I. The blank shown in Fig. 5 is formed with the usual side wall areas 3 and at each end is provided with short closure flaps d which will underlie, as customary, outer and final closure flaps 5 for the top and bottom of the carton.

At one side of the blank there is provided the usual side wall lateral extension 6 which will normally underlie and be glued to the opposite outermost side wall section. Integral with such side wall gluing section 6 is the flexible and pro- 9 Claims. ((31. 229-38.)

. Z V jectedflap-partition I, the latter usually being ofsuch width that when the blank is erected into carton form, as shown in Fig. 2, the said flexible flap partition will, at its free edge, abut one of the side walls and will extend in a straight line; It will be understood, however, that the flap may be wider so that in its erected position, the partition flap will be put under compression and forced to assume a curved formation within the carton.

When a radio tube or otherapp-ropriate fragile article is inserted into the carton, the side wall area thereof will engage and deflect the flap partition I to an extent controlled by the diameter of such fragile article and a tight articleenclosing carton will be provided, the latter preventing such movement of the enclosed article, as to contribute, in such'respect, to breakage. Also, in multipleshipping of'the cartons, they may be so arranged in the container thatthe flap partitions will hold the fragile articles so spaced from each other that breakage is avoided. Thus the large cartons holding a dozen or more of the individual cartons maybe of light construction and of much lower cost than those heretofore employed.

In the structure of Fig. 9-, shown erected in Fig. 3, the flap partition has been divided by a diagonal cut so that the flap partition has a major section 7a and an underlying minor section "I, which is-not separated from the section 6 in a score line, and thus forms a continuation of the section 6 lying flat against the side-wall 3. The carton, in other'substantial respects, is the sameas that of Fig. 5, although the end closure flaps are shown-notched at 53:. Such a carton may be'usedin two ways. Thus when the base of a radio tube, or other fragile article, is'of greater diameter than 'the upper structure of thetube, the score line 8 bounding the outerglue area for connection at the side walls in the erected carton, may extend, as shown-in Fig; 7, across both of the flap areas la and l, and when the carton is erected, the flaps will lie at different angles in the carton, as shown in Fig. 10. In Figures 3 and, 10, the upper portion of a radio tube'is indicated by the dotted line 9 as abut ting flap-section la, whereas the base area [0 of greater diameter maybe unsupported as shown in Figure, 3, or may abut the flap section I, as shown in Figure 10. It willbe apparent that a smaller article 2* may be supported in the carton of Figure-10 in'a manner similar to that shown in Figure 2. However, when the article to be insertedinthecarton'is-of such form as not to require the divisional effect of flap 1, the latter will not be scored on the line 8 beyond cross flap 1a, so that flap I will remain in full surface contact with the inner wall of the carton. The flap I thus maintains an even thickness from end to end of the body of the carton, when in its flat folded state, which is important in proper feeding from a stack of the cartons from the feed magazine of a cartoning machine.

In the structure of Figs. 4 and 8, the flap partition is inwardly bounded by the score line 8a: and is provided with a second intermediate score line H to provide two contiguous partition flap sections l2 and I3. When the carton is erected, the carton folds back on itself at the score line H like a tent, which arrangement centers the tube in the carton, keeping it from contact with all of the side walls with the exception of one. The blank in Fig. 8 as to the top and bottom closure flaps may be substantially similar to the construction shown in Fig. '7 and hence the same reference numerals have been used for such parts.

It will be understood that various modifications may be made in the form and arrangement of the elements constituting the embodiments of the invention illustrated in the drawings, without departing from the spirit of the invention. In some cases the areas left vacant by the action of the flap partition may be utilized for the reception of small units, as indicated at 2 in Figs. 2-4 inclusive but ordinarily such spaces will not be utilized.

As a further modification, and referring to the blank of Fig. 8, the flap partition sections l2 and I3 may be increased to four so that a diamond shape protecting flap partition formation will be provided within the carton when the latter is erected, the two additional fiap sections lbeing indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 4 at M and J5.

I claim:

1. A carton comprising side walls, end walls, a plurality of partitions of different lengths at- :tached to one of said side walls at a common .hinge line, said partitions being bent to extend inwardly of the carton and angularly of said side walls and of each other, the free ends of said partitions freely and slidably abutting one of said .side walls.

2. A carton comprising integrally connected side walls, one of said walls having an extension underlying a portion of an adjacent second side wall and secured thereto, said extension terminating at a hinge line, a first partition attached to said extension at said hinge line and extending angularly inwardly of said carton into free contact with the internal surface of said carton, and a second partition attached to said extension at said hinge line, said second partition being of different length than said first partition and extending along said second wall in full surface contact therewith.

3. A carton comprising integrally connected side walls, one of said walls having an extension underlying aportion of an adjacent second side wall and secured thereto, said extension terminating at a hinge line, a first partition attached to said extension at said hinge line and extending angularly inwardly of said carton into free contact with the internal surface of said carton, a second partition attached to said extension at said hinge line, said second partition being of diiferent length than said first partition and so as to be disposed in said carton angularly of said first partition and extend inwardly of said second wall across a corner of said carton into slidable abutment with a third wall.

4. A collapsible carton of substantially rectangular cross-section fabricated from a single blank having first, second, third, and fourth side wall sections which are separated by fold lines and are angularly related in the erected carton, and end closure flaps; the first and fourth side wall sections being partially overlapped and rigidly secured together; an internal flap section extending integrally from the inner side wall section at said overlap, said flap section extending in a single plane in angular relation to the first side wall section, and having its free edge in sliding contact with the inner surface of the second side wall section and effectively providing a flexible inner wall section in the erected carton to yieldingly support an article therein, and a second internal flap section extending integrally from said inner side wall section at said overlap. said second fiap section being shorter than the first flap section and likewise having its free edge in sliding contact with the inner surface of the said second side wall.

5. An integral carton of substantially rectangular cross-section for the protection of fragile articles consisting of a single blank having first, second, third and fourth side wall panels which are separated by fold lines and are angularly related in the erected carton, at least two end closure flaps having foldable-extensions, said end closure flaps integrally extending from the ends of certain of said first, second, and fourth side wall panels only, additional and closure flaps extending integrally from the opposite ends of two of the side wall panels which are opposed in the erected carton and, in the erected carton, are immediately adjacent the panels to which said first mentioned end closure flaps are attached. said end closure flaps being adapted to provide end walls of the erected closed carton, a glue lap extending from said fourth side wall panel and adapted to be overlapped by said first side wall panel and'be rigidly secured thereto, and an internal flap panel extending integrally from said glue lap in angular relation to said first side wall panel in the erected carton and terminating in a free end in sliding contact with the inner surface of said second side wall panel to provide a flexible inner wall panel in the erected carton to yieldingly support an article therein, said inner flap panel having at least one lateral edge portion inclined with respect to the fold lines whereby an article being inserted into the carton exerts the camming action against said edge portion to facilita e the loading of said carton.

6. The carton according to claim 5 together with an additional internal flap panel extending integrally from said glue lap in angular relation with the first-mentioned flap panel.

'7. The carton of claim 6 wherein the combined width of said glue lap and the said additional internal flap panel is less than the width of said first side wall panel whereby said additional flap panel is adapted to lie in full surface contact with said first side wall panel.

8. A carton according to claim 6 wherein said additional internal flap panel also extends in angular relation to said first side wall panel in the erected carton and terminates in a free edge in sliding contact with the inner surface of said second side wall panel to provide an additional flexible inner wall panel in the erected carton.

9. A collapsible carton for the protection of fragile articles fabricated from a single blank having first, second, third and fourth side wall sections which ar separated by fold lines and are angularly related in the erected carton, and

end closure flaps; the first and fourth side wall 5 sections being partially overlapped and rigidly secured together; a first internal flap section extending integrally from the inner side wall section at said overlap, said first flap section extending in a single plane in angular relation to said first side wall section and having its free edge in sliding contact with the inner surface of the second side wall section and effectively providing a flexible inner wall section in the erected carton to yieldingly support an article therein, 15

and a second flap section extending integrally from said inner side wall section at said overlap, said second flap section being shorter than said first flap section and adapted to lie in full surface contact with said first side wall section in 20 the erected carton.

JOHN F. CURRIVAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1112752 *27 Oct 19136 Oct 1914Jose Ramon AvellanalCigar box or wrapping.
US1737950 *3 Mar 19283 Dec 1929Scotland Bayard SCarton
US2008949 *25 May 193323 Jul 1935Hinde And Dauch Paper CompanyCarton
US2129198 *19 Dec 19366 Sep 1938Eastman Kodak CoShipping carton for motion picture film
US2367345 *12 Nov 194116 Jan 1945Gardner Richardson CoProtective package
US2539966 *18 Jan 194730 Jan 1951Suner Orovig JoseFolding frame or receptacle
GB256037A * Title not available
GB258925A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2714981 *12 Jan 19539 Aug 1955Wilkata Folding Box CompanyShock-proof carton
US2732122 *30 Apr 195424 Jan 1956 Protective carton
US2732996 *16 Oct 195231 Jan 1956 Radio tube cartons
US2764337 *13 Aug 195225 Sep 1956Bradley & Gilbert CompanyProtective carton
US2778526 *24 Mar 195422 Jan 1957Atlanta Paper CompanyPartition structure for compartmented cartons
US2828902 *12 Nov 19531 Apr 1958Diamond Match CoCarton with integral tubular liner
US2841320 *9 Sep 19531 Jul 1958Currivan John FIntegral cartons for the protection of fragile articles
US2845976 *14 May 19565 Aug 1958Arthur S MillerCollapsible roll-up container
US2854181 *5 Feb 195430 Sep 1958W C Ritchie And CompanyCarton
US2856614 *2 Jul 195621 Oct 1958Albert J FihePillow support
US2861717 *18 Jun 195625 Nov 1958Continental Paper CompanyDispensing carton for paper cups
US2893623 *2 Jul 19587 Jul 1959Sylvania Electric ProdRadio tube carton
US2905316 *23 Sep 195722 Sep 1959Mead Atlanta Paper CompanyLight bulb carton and overwrap therefor
US3050231 *18 Aug 195921 Aug 1962Standard Packaging CorpProtective carton
US3125277 *12 May 196117 Mar 1964 Box and closure therefor
US3162303 *8 Apr 196322 Dec 1964St Regis Paper CoContainers for electrical bulbs and the like
US3361330 *6 Jan 19662 Jan 1968Fed Paper Board Co IncCarton
US3400879 *28 Feb 196710 Sep 1968Diamond Int CorpCarton with cushioning platform and blank for producing the same
US3455497 *15 Apr 196615 Jul 1969Comly Gillam Carton CorpCartons for inspection
US3670933 *13 Jul 197020 Jun 1972Jones Cherry EPersonal money container
US3703256 *23 Mar 197121 Nov 1972Ross Donald RFolding box
US3853259 *4 Feb 197410 Dec 1974Tupper TDisplay and storage container
US3923235 *19 Feb 19752 Dec 1975Hoerner Waldorf CorpProtective carton
US3942710 *30 Aug 19749 Mar 1976Potlatch CorporationFolding carton with interior struts
US4260059 *1 Jun 19797 Apr 1981Champion International CorporationContainer having an internal support for fragile articles and blank therefor
US4341338 *23 Jun 198027 Jul 1982Owens-Illinois, Inc.Corrugated box bulk materials
US4416412 *12 Jul 198222 Nov 1983Rock-Tenn CompanyCollapsible carton with interior partitions
US4482055 *4 Feb 198213 Nov 1984Champion International CorporationIntegral carton blank for a carton with four cells and carton
US4925088 *6 Sep 198915 May 1990R. G. Barry CorporationPackaging container
US5218722 *6 May 199215 Jun 1993Vandenberg Mark LTie fastener
US641263530 Jun 20002 Jul 2002Cisco Technology, Inc.Non-orthogonal packing method and apparatus
US66663339 Aug 200223 Dec 2003Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcCarton and carton blank
US697152422 May 20036 Dec 2005Denise VoswinkelOne-piece gift box
US72521975 Dec 20057 Aug 2007Denise VoswinkelOne-piece gift box
US76615366 Aug 200716 Feb 2010Denise VoswinkelOne-piece gift box
US20110198453 *18 Feb 201018 Aug 2011Volk Donald JCollapsible disposable toothbrush holder and blank therefor
USRE29263 *23 Jun 197614 Jun 1977Hoerner Waldorf CorporationProtective carton
EP1195330A1 *7 Sep 200110 Apr 2002FinegaPackaging case for at least one unitary product and blank for forming the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/591, 206/418, 206/593, 229/120.12
International ClassificationB65D5/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5016
European ClassificationB65D5/50A4