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Publication numberUS2552853 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date15 May 1951
Filing date23 Nov 1945
Priority date23 Nov 1945
Publication numberUS 2552853 A, US 2552853A, US-A-2552853, US2552853 A, US2552853A
InventorsGordon Isserstedt Siegfreid
Original AssigneeGordon Isserstedt Siegfreid
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe apparatus for cleaning porous material
US 2552853 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 15, 1951 s. G. ISSERSTEDT SYRINGE APPARATUS FOR CLEANING POROUS MATERIAL 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 23, 1945 mvan'ron. s. G. ISSERSTEDT ATT 'YS May 15, 1951 s. G. ISSERSTEDT SYRINGE APPARATUS FOR CLEANING POROUS MATER IAL Filed NOV. 23, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTQR 2M. m2 Mm m M a 5 w rubbed over the soiled material.

Patented May 15, 1951 SYRINGE APPARATUS FOR CLEANING POROUS MATERIAL Siegfreid Gordon Isserstedt, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Application November 23, 1945, Serial No. 630,474

In the removal of spots from various fabrics, cloth or the like, the conventional method employed by the average individual is to apply cleaning fluid to a clean cloth which is then The dirt is thereby partially dissolved, partly absorbed by the cleaning cloth and partly rubbed into the soiled material. This method tends to leave rings on the material being cleaned formed by the dissolved dirt rubbed into a larger area of the material. This disadvantageous method is avoided by the present invention which provides a means not only for applying cleaning fluid to the material, but for thoroughly washing a small area of the material by forcing relatively large amounts of cleaning fluid through it, thus washing out the spot in substantially the same manner as dry cleaning machines employed by professional cleaners.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a simple means for washing a small area of soiled material in such a manner that the soiled portion of the material is properly cleaned such as is achieved by professional cleaners.

A further object of the invention is to provide a simple method for cleaning small areas of soiled material wherein the accessories required are of simple nature and are readily operated by the average individual.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a compact simple cleaning jar or container providing facilities for effecting cleaning of this character and which may be made available as a complete cleaning unit or as an accessory usable in conjunction with an average container for cleaning fluid.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a cleaning means which due to its simple character may be made available at comparatively low cost.

With these and other objects in view, the invention generally comprises a container designed to receive cleaning fluid, an insert therefor over which the soiled material is designed to be disposed and a syringe applicable to the material on the insert for freely passing cleaning fluid through the soiled material. This combination may include an insert of such character as to dispose the material slightly below the level of the cleaning fluid carried therein to permit back and forth movement of the fluid through the soiled portion of the material. It may also be formed as an accessory usable in conjunction with the conventional cleaning fluid container, wherein the insert takes the form of a permanent portion of the accessory. Preferably the cleaning fluid container of the present invention includes a cover member usable as a surface for sup- 9 Claims. (Cl. 68-213) porting the cleaned area of the material. to permit final rubbing and drying of the said area.

The invention will be fully understood by reference to the following detailed specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings,

Figure l is a longitudinal section taken through a syringe-like bulb formed according to the present invention. Figure la is a side elevation of a disc like filter element. Figure 1b is 'a longitudinal section taken through a container designed co-operatively to employ the elements of Figure 1 and 1a.

Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are schematic views of the steps followed in cleaning, the first two views being in longitudinal section.

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section taken through an alternative form of syringe including an air vent tube, the structure being particularly designed for cleaning heavy materials.

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section taken through a cleaning combination wherein the container is designed particularly as an accessory filled from the conventional container of cleaning fluid; and

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section taken through a cleaning combination including a container structure having a support for the material to be cleaned which is disposed inwardly of the container to a substantial degree to permit submerging the soiled area of the material directly in the cleaning fluid.

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, A indicates a cleaning combination which is made up of a container l8 and a syringe II. The container preferably is formed with a substantially large inlet opening l2 and is designed to carry within the opening an insert 13 which is designed to support the material to be cleaned such, for instance, as is clearly illustrated in Fig. 3. r

The insert is formed with a central opening l4 over which the soiled area of the goods is designed to be positioned, as shown in Fig. 3, de-

signed to be removed and removably supported in suitable manner such as by the ledge l5 formed within the neck of the container. The jar is readily closed by a suitable cover it which is preferably designed to perform the functions of a support for the material in the final step of the cleaning operation as will hereinafter appear. The syringe is of particular form as shown, having a lower base portion ll which is outwardly flared to form a suitable grip and through which pressure may be applied to effect a substantial seal between the bases of the syringe and the insert l3 when clamping the material therebetween. It is formed with a lower restricted opening it which opens into a cupped recess Hi. The cupped area is preferably substantially similar to the area of the opening l4.

In order to provide for an efficient cleaning operation so as to cause the fluid to pass through the soiled area of the material and to prevent spraying of the cleaning fluid through other portions of the material by capillary action, it is necessary to provide for an efficient seal between the support l3 and syringe as they clamp the area of the materia1 therebetween. This is effected by providing the concentric sealing rings 20 which efliciently clamp the material marginally of the soiled area of the material, thus to prevent the normal capillary action of the material when saturated with the cleaning fluid. In addition, a further seal is effected by forming the marginal edges of the base with an inward and downward taper 2|. This tapered portion, as shown particularly in Fig. 3, is designed in effect to wedge the material against the marginal edge of the insert [3. In this way, therefore, the efficient passage of the cleaning fluid through the soiled area of the material is provided for and the spraying of the fluid through the material beyond the area to be cleaned is largely prev nted.

To eifect a cleaning operation, the cover It is removed from the container and the insert 13 is also removed, thus to permit the prog'ection of the base of the syringe into the container as shown in Fig. 2, so that the syringe may be filled. Preferably, the body of the syringe is formed wide enough so that it will engage the neck of the container intermediate the ends of the syringe thereby to prevent the base of the syringe from passing down into the container directly adjacent to or touching the bottom thereof in order to prevent sucking up any sediment which might pOS- s'ibly :lie in the base of the container from a previous cleaning operation.

In this way, therefore, the cleaning fluid is sucked into the syringe. The syringe is then removed from the container and the insert 13 replaced. The material to be cleaned is then laid over the top of the container and the soiled area disposed over the opening l4 therein. The syringe then may be placed in the position shown in Fig. 3, pressure applied thereto preferably through the grip provided at the base so as to seal the soiled area of the cloth firmly between the insert and the base of the syringe whereupon the fluid in the syringe is caused to be forced through the soiled material. The result is that the dirt contained in the soiled area is dissolved and washed away. Preferably the soiled side of the material is turn d downwardly towards the opening 24 of the insert so that the dirt as it is dissolved is caused to wash away without being passed through the unsoiled or less soiled portion of the material.

The cleaning fluid carried in the container may, in the course of time, become contaminated although where dirt or foreign material passes into the fluid it will often form as a sediment in the bottom and, therefore, this will not affect cleaning operations. In this case, however, I prefer to employ a filter which may take the form of a disc-like element 22 which may be disposed to lie upon the insert i3 so that the cleaning fluid as it passes through the material with a clean cloth until the dampened area is dry. In this manner, therefore, a spot may be efficiently cleaned from the material and rings and the like which are usually left in average manual cleaning operations are avoided.

This method readily applies to light materials, but where particularly heavy materials are concerned which require a higher pressure in order to force the fluid efficiently through them, it may be desirable to provide a special form of syringe which will avoid overflow of the cleaning fluid in the case where a particularly good seal is not aifected between the base of the syringe, the material being cleaned and the support. Such a construction is illustrated in Fig. 5 wherein the syringe is of general formbut includes an air tube 23 which extends from the upper extremities of the interior of the syringe to open upon an annular recess 26 disposed between the concentric sealing rings 2'5 and 26. Thus, where sufficient pressure is not applied to the base of the syringe in order to effect an efficient seal the fluid within the syringe will not be forced therefrom under adequate pressure because of the escape of air through the air tube 23. Where, however, a substantial seal is effected between the material and the base of the syringe, there will be created in the annular recess 25 a pressure corresponding to the pressure under which the fluid is forced from the syringe so that due to the equalization of this pressure as between the annular recess 24 and the cupped recess. [9 of the syringe, the fluid passing through the material is very efflciently maintained from spraying into a larger area of the material.

In the alternative form shown in Fig. 6, the' container takes the form of an accessory which is usable in conjunction with the conventional cleaning fluid container. In this connection, the container is provided with the open dished mouth 21, the surface of the dished portion thereof forming a permanent portion of the top of the container and functioning as the support for the material in place of the removable insert, as described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4. A central opening '28 is provided for the passage of fluid while an opening 29 is provided in the upper extremity of the container which functions as a discharge opening for pouring back the contents of the container to the conventional cleaning fluid container. It also functions a an air vent to prevent the escape of air from the container during the cleaning-operation. In this case the container is preferably formed shallow so as to reduce the amount of fluid that may be used in any one cleaning operation. Moreover, the preparation is such that two methods of cleaning may be performed where required. On the one hand, and particularly in the case of thin materialftli container may be fllled to a level above the level of the opening '28 so that the soiled portion is immersed in the cleaning fluid and cleaning may be effected by sucking the fluid into the syringe and forcing it back out so as to cause it to pass back and forth through the material to eifect a thorough washing action. On the other hand, and particularly in the case of figured materials, the syringe maybe filled first and the cloth laid over the empty dished portion 2'! of the container with the soiled surface downwards and the fluid passed through it in the conventional manner as described in connection with Figs. 1 and 4.

The further alternative form is shown in Fig. 7 wherein the cleaning'combination includes'a container 30 which is formed with the deeply dished support 3| depending within the container and terminating at its lower end in an aperture 3la through which cleaning fluid may be caused to pass upon operation of the syringe; the support 3! is preferably formed as a connected part of the container. In this case, for instance, a metal container is illustrated wherein the dished portion 3! is rolled into engagement with the upper extremities of the container, which latter may be formed with screw thread 32 to permit the application of a removable cover in a practical manner.

In this case the structure is particularly designed for a thorough back and forth washing of the fluid through the material being cleaned such as in the manner described in connection with Fig. 6.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that by a combination of simple elements such as described, means is provided for thoroughly washing a small area of materials with cleaning fluid whereby to remove the soil efliciently and in a simple practical operation.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material comprising in combination a, container having a dished portion at its top to form a support for the material, said support having a central opening therein, and a syringe having a base with centrally disposed fluid pass-age means therein, said base being formed with a clamping surface encircling the said passage to retain said material on said support to seal and confine the soiled area whereby to concentrate the flow of cleaning fluid under pressure from the syringe on the soiled area, said cleaning fluid passing through the soiled area of material under pressure to dissolve and remove the soiling substance.

2. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material as claimed in claim 1 in which the syringe is formed with an enlarged base area substantially corresponding to the area of said dished portion of said support for co-operation with the dished portion of said support, said base of the syringe being formed with means for sealing an area of the porous material underlying the fluid passage of the syringe from portions of the material beyond said area.

3. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material as claimed in claim 1 in which the syringe is formed with an enlarged base of an area substantially corresponding to the dished portion of said support, the peripheral wall of the base being inwardly tapered to clamp the material against the marginal edges of the support to seal the porous material underlying the base from the porous material lying beyond the base of the syringe.

4. In apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material wherein cleaning fluid is caused to pass through the soiled area under pressure, a syringe for forcing said fluid through the material comprising a bulb having an enlarged base, a fluid inlet and outlet opening communicating with the interior of the bulb and opening to the atmosphere central of the base, said base being formed with an inwardly recessed area surrounding said inlet and outlet opening and being formed with a sealing groove concentric to said inlet and outlet opening beyond the recessed area of the base to form a means of sealing material confined under the base of the syringe and against the support whereby to avoid saturation of areas of the material extending be yond the base. 7

5. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material as claimed in claim 4 in which the base of the syringe is provided with a plurality of concentric sealing grooves.

6. A syringe as claimed in claim 4 in which an air tube extends from the said groove into the interior of the syringe to cause air to escape into said groove from the interior of the syringe, said escaping air forming an air seal within said groove as pressure is applied to the bulb.

'7. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material comprising in combination a container having a relatively large inlet opening, a removable dished support mounted to dispose said dished portion within said container opening, said support having an opening therein, and a syringe having an enlarged base of an area substantially corresponding to the dished portion of said support, the opening of said syringe being formed in said base said support being removable for the insertion of said syringe in said container to fill it with fluid carried by the latter, said sup-port when in position on said container being designed to support a small soiled area of porous material, the base of said syringe being formed with a clamping surface encircling said syringe opening for retaining said material against said support and to seal said underlying soiled area of material from the adjacent portions of the material, said syringe being designed to force cleaning fluid under pressure through said material into the container to remove the soiling substance.

8. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material as claimed in claim 7 including a filter member supportable between said material and the interior of the container designed to filter the fluid passing through from the syringe to the container.

9. Apparatus for cleaning small soiled areas of porous material comprising in combination a container having a dished portion at its top to form a support for the material, said support having a central opening therein, and a syringe formed with a base having a clamping surface encircling its opening to clamp said material on said support, said dished support being designed to be partially submerged in said fluid, said syringe when clamping said material on said support and partially submerged in said fluid being caused to force the fluid back and forth through the material to dissolve and remove the soiling substance.

SIEGFREID GORDON ISSERSTEDT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 656,802 Batz Mar. 28, 1900 970,069 Malmros Sept. 13, 1910 1,775,407 Rath Sept. 9, 1930 2,009,365 Wait July 23, 1935 2,254,691 MacLelland -1 Sept. 2, 1941 2,301,227 Pickett Nov. 10, 1942 2,344,982 Dyer Mar. 28, 1944 2,399,576 Shoop Apr. 30, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 610,696 Germany Apr. 3, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US656802 *5 Mar 190028 Aug 1900Johanna M BatzGrease-spot remover.
US970069 *20 Dec 190913 Sep 1910Gustaf MalmrosSpot-cleaner.
US1775407 *7 May 19299 Sep 1930Wilhelm RathWashing machine
US2009365 *12 Apr 193023 Jul 1935John C WaitProcess of cleaning
US2254691 *4 Mar 19412 Sep 1941Maclelland Jr Walter SFabric cleaning machine
US2301227 *14 May 194110 Nov 1942Mcmullen Doyle EGarment spotting machine
US2344982 *17 May 194028 Mar 1944Gen Motors CorpMethod oe washing
US2399576 *28 Dec 194330 Apr 1946Shoop Glen CSpotting board attachment
DE610696C *3 Apr 1935Dorothea Boerger Geb WilligerHandwaschgeraet aus Gummischwamm
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2949622 *6 Jul 195923 Aug 1960Procter & GambleLiquid applicators
US4521456 *22 Aug 19834 Jun 1985Usm CorporationApplicator nozzle
US5707163 *28 Nov 199413 Jan 1998Gregory; JackPortable stain and spot removal system
US5840675 *17 Jan 199724 Nov 1998The Procter And Gamble CompanyAbsorbent substrate, liquid cleaning composition, coversheet permeable to cleaning composition
US617134618 Mar 19979 Jan 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyDual-step stain removal process
US623377117 Jan 199722 May 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyDry cleaning
US62620092 Mar 199817 Jul 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyCovered cleaning sheet
US7047582 *19 Mar 200223 May 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyStain removal methods and products associated therewith
US7389658 *12 Feb 200324 Jun 2008Soeberg JesperApparatus for cleaning a local area of a fabric
US8312746 *6 Jun 200820 Nov 2012Francisco Javier Perez-Toril GalanStain-removing machine
US20100139332 *6 Jun 200810 Jun 2010Francisco Javier Perez-Toril GalanStain-removing machine
WO1997006723A1 *9 Aug 199627 Feb 1997Procter & GambleStain removal device
WO1997026821A1 *24 Jan 199731 Jul 1997Procter & GambleImproved stain removal device
WO1997032004A1 *19 Feb 19974 Sep 1997Procter & GambleControlled release fabric care article
WO1997034519A1 *18 Mar 199725 Sep 1997Procter & GambleDual-step stain removal process
WO1998044185A1 *2 Mar 19988 Oct 1998Procter & GambleCovered cleaning sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/213, 401/10, 68/205.00R, 68/184, 401/266, 401/183
International ClassificationD06F43/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F43/002
European ClassificationD06F43/00B