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Publication numberUS2524195 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date3 Oct 1950
Filing date13 Apr 1950
Priority date13 Apr 1950
Publication numberUS 2524195 A, US 2524195A, US-A-2524195, US2524195 A, US2524195A
InventorsHoover John R C
Original AssigneeHoover John R C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gauze packing instrument
US 2524195 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3, 1950 J. R. c. HOOVER GAUZE PACKING INSTRUMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 13, 1950 \\\\\\\\\*&\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ INVENTOR. M

ATTOR/VFYS J. R- C. HQOVER GAUZE PACKING INSTRUMENT Oct. 3, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 13, 1950 N INVENTOR. Jw/A/ R. 0. H00 mm,

A 7' 7' ORA E Y6 Patented Oct. 3 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GAUZE PACKING INSTRUMENT John R. C lioover, Hadclam, Kans. Application April 13, 1950, Serial No. 155,763

8 Claims.

My invention relates to surgical instruments, and it is one object of the invention to provide an instrument adapted to carry a roll of bandage gauze and by means of which the gauze may be discharged into a patients uterine cavity, nose, throat, or other cavities which must be packed with absorbent gauze in order to prevent dangerous loss of blood when a hemorrhage occurs.

Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packer of such construction that a roll of sterile gauze may be mounted in a chamber which is then closed and the gauze fed from the instrument and into the cavity to be packed without being exposed to air or being touched by the operators hand. It will thus be seen that the gauze will not become contaminated while it is being unwound from the roll and packed into the bleeding cavity.

Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packer having a discharge tube leading from the storage chamber for a roll of gauze, the discharge tube being of such length that gauze forced from the tube may be directly applied to the portion of the cavity from which blood is flowing.

It is another object of the invention to provide the packer with a discharge tube which is of such diameter that it may be readily inserted into a cavity to be packed and in addition serves to crumple a strip of bandage gauze .as it is unwound from the roll of gauze and thusimpart very good packing and absorbing qualities to the gauze.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved means for forcing the crumpled gauze through the discharge tube in step by step movements and thus cause the gauze to be progressively forced from the tube and in addition crumpled longitudinally as well as transversely and emerge fromthe tube as a crinkled mass of gauze which is of predetermined diameterand of any length needed for eifective packing of the cavity.

Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packing instrument which is free from small parts which might be liable to become broken or detached during a packing operation and endanger the life of the patient.

Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packer of such construction that antiseptic liquid may be .poured into the chamber in which the roll of gauze is housed and not be liable to be spilled from the chamber during use of the packer. p j Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packer which may be held in one hand and operated by the fingers and thumb, thus leaving the other hand free for holding and using other instruments.

Another object of the invention is to provide a gauze packer which is of simple construction and may be easily taken apart for thorough cleaning and sterilizing after it has been used.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein: v

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the improved gauze packer;

Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Figure 3 is a top plan view, partly in longi tudinal section, showing the gauze-expelling plunger moved forwardly to an expelling position, the cap being removed;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3, showing the plunger shifted rearwardly;

Figure 5 is a sectional View taken longitudinally through the gauze packer along the line 5--5 of Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 66 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a plan view of the expelling plunger removed;

Figure 8 is a fragmentary view of a modified form of expelling plunger;

Figure 9 is an elevational view of the cap for closing the front end of the tube through which the gauze is discharged;

Figure 10 is a sectional view taken longitudinally through the cap; and

Figure 11 is a sectional view of a modifiedform of gauze container.

This improved gauze packer consists briefly of a gauze container I, a main tube or barrel 2, a short tube or barrel 3, and a plunger A by means of which gauze is fed in step by step movements through the main barrel and discharged from the front end thereof, a cap 5 being provided for closing the front end of the main barrel when the instrument is not in use. All parts of the instrument are formed of metal, or other suitable material, which may be easily cleaned and thoroughly sterilized after use.

tance so that the person using the instrument may pass fingers of one hand through eyes or rings 6 mounted at opposite sides of the rear end portion of the main barrel and braced by webs I and his thumb through the eye or ring 8 at the rear end of the plunger 4i and conveniently hold the instrument with one hand and impart reciprocating movement to the plunger, thus leaving the other hand free.

The container 3 is of cylindrical shape and is disposed transversely of the main tube or barrel 2 and projects from opposite sides of the main barrel equal distances, ends of the container being closed by heads or caps 9, which fit snugly into ends of the cylindrical body of the container. A rod or bolt IE passes longitudinally through the container, axially thereof, and has threaded end portions which pass through openings l I formed centrally of the caps 9 so that nuts 12 may be screwed upon protruding ends of the bolt and tightened to firmly hold the caps in closing relation to ends of the container. It will be understood that if so desired, the bolt may be formed rigid with one cap and have its other end threaded and passed through the second cap so that a'nut may be applied to it and the two caps held in place with one nut. Figure 11 shows a modified construction wherein the caps i3 are screwed into internally threaded end portions of the container and have sockets M at their centers in'which ends of the rod I?) are removably fitted so that the rod willbe supported axially of the container when the caps are screwed into ends ofthe container.

"Thi's packing instrument is loaded with absorbent bandage gauze it which may be of any conventional width and i formed into the usual roll it. This roll of gauze is thrust into the container through an open end from which the cap has been removed and in order that the roll of gauze may be readily fitted about the rod H3 or l5, a tubular core I1 is fitted into the roll. This core extends the full length of the roll and is of such internal diameter that it will fit snugly about the rod. Thereforefthe roll of bandage gauze may be very easily fitted into the container with the rod passing through the core and turn freely about the rod to unwind the gauze from the rollj After the roll of gauze has been inserted into the container, the free outer end of the gauze is fed through the short tube or barrel 3 into the main barrel '2 and then the gauze is fed forwardly through the main barrelto the front end thereof.

Feeding of the gauze through the main barrel is accomplished by means of the plunger 4, and since'the forward portion I8 of the plunger is of appreciably reduced diameter and resilient, the

plunger may also be used for feeding the gauze through the auxiliary barrel 3 and into the main barrel. The reduced forward portion of the plunger may be referred to as a resilient tip for the plunger which is normally disposed axially of the main barrel, but may be flexed transversely in order to follow the diagonally extend ing front end portion 2 of the barrel, it being understood that the barrel may be straight throughout its length or bent to form the diagonally extending front end portion according t'othe use for which the instrument is intended. Spurs iii are formed at the front end of the tip I8 of the plunger in order that the plunger may obtain a firm grip upon the gauze and readily force it through the barrel, and if so desired, additional spurs 20 may be formed upon the tip in rearwardly spaced relation to the spurs it While two spurs 20 have been shown in Figure 8, it will be understood that additional ones may be provided.

This instrument is prepared for use by insert" ing a roll of bandage gauze into the container and forcing the free end portion of the gauze through the tube 3 into the main barrel 2 a sufficient distance for the spurs of the plunger to engage the gauze and force it forwardly through the main barrel and out through the open end of the barrel. As the bandage gauze is drawn from the roll and passed through the tube 3, it is crumpled transversely and thus formed into a thick strand of gauze which protrudes into the main barrel. This free end of the strand is gripped by the spurs of the plunger and as the plunger isreciprocated longitudinally in the main barrel, the spurs progressively force the crumpled auz f rwa dly in t b tep movem n a the crumpled gauze will be crinkled longitudinally as it' is advanced forwardly through, the barrel. and finally forced outwardly through the front end of the barrel.

Since the instrument has a long. barrel 2, it may be thrust into the cavity. to. be packed quite a' distance, and the open front end of its barrel disposed close to the place which, needs packing and as the gauze is, in the, form of a crinkled strand which is quite thick, it may be easily and quickly wadded into. place and so held while it is being cut close to the. front end of the barrel if all of the gauze is not to be used.

A collar 2i which is slidable along the barrel 2 to adjusted positions thereon serves to limit movement of the barrel into the cavity into which it is thrust. If so desired, liquid disinfectant may be poured into the container before the cap 9 is applied and secured and a gasket apand prevents air from entering the barrel and thus prevents gauze which has been fed into the barrel from becoming contaminated.

It should also be noted that a packing instrument which has been filled with gauze may be placed in a fabric bag and the packer and the bag: thenplaced in a sterilizer to eifect thorough sterilizing of thebag and, the enclosed packer. The enclosed instrument may thenbe stored in a cabinet in a doctors QfilCB or placed in a bag carried by a doctorwhilevisiting outsidepatients and the sterilized instrument will be ready for instant use when needed inan emergency. After the instrument has been used, it may be easily taken apart, thorou hly cleaned and sterilized, andre-changedwith a rollof gauzeandput away until again needed.

From a mechanical standpoint, it is advantageous to have the tube 2 extending beyond the intersection of the tube 3 therewith a distance substantially equivalent to the length of the larger ortion of the plunger 4, Thus, when the average hand pulls the plunger .rearwardly out of the main tube 2, the impaction of gauze in said maintube will be obviated.

Again, it may be emphasized that direc ing the tube 3 at an angle, as shown in the drawing, is important in facilitating the engagement of the barbs of the plunger with th gauze as it is fed from the tube 3 to the tube 2. Were it not for this angularity, it would be possible for the plunger to escape contact With'the gauze. While I 5 have shown two barbs i9 at the end of the plunger, it will be understood that this number may be increased as desired.

It will also be seen that the sterility of the gauze may be retained by being packed or loaded in a packer. Such a packer loaded with sterile gauze would be available for use at all times and yet would not be touched or exposed for contamination.

A further advantage of this device is that it will eliminate the necessity of an assistant, as it leaves the left hand of the doctor or nurse free to do its work.

Being constructed as shown and described, the device is exceptionally durable and being of simple construction, same may be made economically and made available to users at comparatively low cost.

Frim the foregoing description of the construction of my improved gauze packing instrument, the method of assembly and application thereof to use will be readily understood, and it will be seen that I have provided a simple, inexpensive and efficient means for carrying out the various objects of the invention.

While I have described the elements best adapted to perform the functions set forth, it is apparent that various changes in form, proportion and in the minor details of construction, may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the principles of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, and means for feeding gauze forwardly through the main barrel and out of the front end thereof. 7

2. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, the second barrel serving to crimp the strip of gauze transversely as the gauze passes through the second barrel and into the main barrel, and means for feeding the crimped gauze forwardly through the main barrel and out of the front end thereof.

3. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, the second barrel serving to crimp the strip of gauze transversely as the gauze passes through the second barrel and into the main barrel, and means for feeding the crimped gauze forwardly through the main barrel in step by step movements and thereby crinkling the said crimped gauze longitudinally as it is moved forwardly and discharged from the front end of the main barrel;

l. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, the second barrel serving to crimp the strip of gauze transversely as the gauze passes through the second barrel and into the main barrel, and means for feeding the crimped gauze forwardly through the main barrel in step by step movements and thereby crinkling the said crimped gauze and a plunger slidable longitudinally in the main barrel through the rear end thereof and extending beyond the front end of the second barrel and provided with spurs for gripping the crimped gauze and crinkling the same longitudinally and feeding the crimped and crinkled gauze forwardly in step by step movements and out of the front end of the main barrel.

5. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, the second barrel serving to crimp the strip of gauze transversely as the gauze passes through the second barrel and into the main barrel, and means for feeding the crimped gauze forwardly through the main barrel in step by step movements and thereby crinkling the said crimped gauze and a plunger slidable longitudinally in the main barrel through the rear end thereof and having its front end provided with a longitudinally extending resilient tip terminating forwardly of the front end of the second barrel and carrying spurs serving to grip the crimped gauze and crinkle the same longitudinally as the plunger is reciprocated in the main barrel and moves the gauze in step by step movements forwardly through and out of the main barrel.

6. A gauze packing instrument comprising a container for a roll of gauze, a main barrel extending forwardly from said container, a second barrel extending forwardly from said container and having its rear end communicating with the container and its front end communicating with the main barrel in spaced relation to the front end thereof and through which a strip of gauze passes into the main barrel, the second barrel serving to crimp the strip of gauze transversely as the gauze passes through the second barrel and into the main barrel, and means for feeding the crimped gauze forwardly through the main barrel in step by step movements and thereby crinkling the said crimped gauze and a plunger slidable longitudinally in the main barrel through the rear end thereof and extending beyond the front end of the second barrel and provided with spurs for gripping the crimped gauze and feeding the gauze through and out of the main barrel, finger-engaging members projecting from opposite sides of the rear portion of the main barrel, and a thumb-engaging member at the rear end of said plunger for imparting reciprocating movements to the plunger while holding the instrument in one hand.

'7. The structure of claim 5 wherein the plunger is removable. through the rear end of the main barrel and the container has a removable closure for one end whereby the resilient tip of the removed plunger may be inserted into the second barrel through the rear end thereof and serve as meansrfor forcing a stripof gauze forwardly through the second barrel and into the main barrel.

8. A gauze packing instrument comprising a holder for a roll of gauze, a barrel extending forwardly from said holder and open at its front end, a member forming communication between the holder and the barrel serving to guide gauze from said holder into said barrel and simultaneously crimp the gauze, transversely during REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 747,525, Willis Dec. 22, 1903 1,456,828 Pistor, May 29, 1923 1,562,656 Park Nov. 24, 1925

Patent Citations
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US1456828 *17 Mar 192229 May 1923August T PistorGauze-packing device
US1562656 *2 Sep 192424 Nov 1925Park Kenneth CStrip-gauze packer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3420237 *2 Sep 19667 Jan 1969Martha K FortayProcess and article for the treatment of severe epistaxis
US4198978 *29 Sep 197722 Apr 1980The Gillette CompanyAdjustable tampon inserter
US4895559 *11 Oct 198823 Jan 1990Shippert Ronald DNasal pack syringe
US5007895 *5 Apr 198916 Apr 1991Burnett George SWound packing instrument
US5263927 *2 Sep 199223 Nov 1993Shlain Leonard MApparatus and methods for dispensing surgical packing
US5304187 *30 Jun 199219 Apr 1994United States Surgical CorporationSurgical element deployment apparatus
US5374261 *23 Oct 199020 Dec 1994Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods-therefor
US5392787 *1 Oct 199328 Feb 1995Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods therefor
US5407423 *25 Aug 199418 Apr 1995Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and method therefor
US5439457 *1 Oct 19938 Aug 1995Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods therefor
US5451204 *14 Apr 199319 Sep 1995Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for endoscopic surgical procedures
US5484426 *1 Oct 199316 Jan 1996Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods therefor
US5514085 *1 Oct 19937 May 1996Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods therefor
US5545169 *19 Aug 199413 Aug 1996Yarger; Richard J.Laparoscopic delivery device
US5556376 *8 Aug 199417 Sep 1996Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices having loop configured portions and collection systems for endoscopic surgical procedures and methods thereof
US5599292 *25 Aug 19944 Feb 1997Yoon; InbaeMultifunctional devices for use in endoscopic surgical procedures and methods therefor
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US6139520 *28 Aug 199731 Oct 2000Boston Scientific CorporationSystem for implanting a cross-linked polysaccharide fiber and methods of forming and inserting the fiber
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US66022185 Jun 20015 Aug 2003Inbae YoonApparatus for ablation of the endometrium of the uterus
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US7815616 *16 Sep 200319 Oct 2010Boehringer Technologies, L.P.Device for treating a wound
US784617127 May 20047 Dec 2010C.R. Bard, Inc.Method and apparatus for delivering a prosthetic fabric into a patient
US82214408 Nov 201017 Jul 2012C.R. Bard, Inc.Method and apparatus for delivering a prosthetic fabric into a patient
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/13
International ClassificationA61F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F15/001
European ClassificationA61F15/00B