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Publication numberUS2099888 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date23 Nov 1937
Filing date15 Dec 1933
Priority date15 Dec 1933
Publication numberUS 2099888 A, US 2099888A, US-A-2099888, US2099888 A, US2099888A
InventorsWarren E Hill, Frederic A Parkhurst
Original AssigneeProphylactic Brush Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making self-sterilizing brushes
US 2099888 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Nov. 23, 1937 UNITED STATES METHOD OF-MAKING SELF-STERILIZING BRUSHES Warren E. Hill, Northampton, Mass., and Fredcrlc A. Parkhurst, Bethesda, Md., assignors to Pro-phy-lac-tic Brush Company, Northampton, Mass a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Application December 15, 1933,

Serial N0. 702,604

'2 Claims. (Cl. 300-21) Our present invention relates to brushes, particularly toilet brushes, and has for its object to provide an improved antiseptic or self-sterilizing brush. a

In an application for United States Letters Patent filed by Warren E. Hill and Clifford L. Mc- Arthur, April 7, 1933, Serial No. 664,894, there is described an antiseptic or self-sterilizingbrush and method of producing it, the brush being rendered antiseptic or self-sterilizing by treating its bristles with a solution of phenyl mercuric salt. The present invention is in certain respects an improvement on the brush and process therein described and in certain other aspects an alternative for them. A particular object of the present invention is to prevent any tendency for the bristles or bristle substitutes, namely, hair, vegetable fibers and synthetic filaments, which have been rendered antiseptic or self-sterilizing becoming 20 discolored or losing their sterile strength substantially within the period of normal useful life of the brush.

We have discovered that if the bristles contain small amounts of reducing agents, such as sulphites, which tend to reduce the antiseptic in the bristles, discoloration will be caused. The present invention contemplates a method of treating bristles whereby they will maintain more permanently their self-sterilizing properties through- 30 out their normal useful life and will not become discolored to any material extent.

In accordance with the method of the invention the brush bristles may be treated either before or after assembly with the brush handle. Our present pr'ocess includes primarily two novel features, the first of which consists in treating the bristles, before or simultaneously with the application of the antiseptic solution, with an oxidizing agent, the effect of which is to oxidize any 40 reducing agents which may have been left on the surface of the bristle during the process of cleaning, bleaching or preparing the bristles, and the second, the stabilization of the antiseptic solution by the treatment during or subsequent to the application of the antiseptic solution. A suitable oxidizing agent is hydrogen peroxide. Suitable stabilizing agents are salts of a halogen and a metal, such as sodium iodide or sodium chloride. While with certain kinds of bristles it may not be necessary to wash or treat them with an oxidizing agent, it isusually desirable to insure uniform treatment regardless of the types or kinds of bristles used.

Various antiseptics or germicides are available for use in the practice of the invention, such for example, as phenyl mercuric nitrate, phenyl mercuric chloride, or other phenyl mercuric salts, oxyquinoline sulfate, parachlorothymol or hexylresorcinol dissolved in a suitable solvent. The most satisfactory results have so far been obtained with a solution of a phenyl mercuric salt, such as nitrate or chloride, in water. We have also found that for permanent results water is much the best solvent, perhaps because better penetration occurs.-

In accordance with the preferred practice of the invention, the bristles are washed thoroughly with a suitable soap, and rinsed. They are then soaked in a 1% aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide, and may be dried or immersed directly in a saturated aqueous solution of phenyl mercuric .nitrate or chloride for about fifteen minutes at about 100 F. Thereafter, the bristles are im-- mersed in a 1% solution of sodium iodide in water for five minutes and then dried at about 125 F. for about thirty minutes. The phenyl mercuric nitrate or chloride which has-penetrated the bristles is converted by treatment with the sodium iodide solution to phenyl mercuric iodide which is less soluble in water.

While we prefer to treat the bristle first with the oxidizing agent, then with the antiseptic and finally with the stabilizing agent, we believe that in certain cases it may be preferable to combine the oxidizing agent and antiseptic in a single bath, or possibly all three in a single bath, the essential thing being that the finished bristle will have been penetrated-by antiseptic which has been stabilized by a proper stabilizer and which is not deteriorated by the presence of any reducing agent except possibly such sulphur compounds as may be contained in the protein of the bristle itself.

Bristles may be treated in accordance with the invention at low cost to render them self-sterilizing throughout the practical useful life of the tooth brush. The treated brush is odorless, tasteless and non-toxic and the treatment has no corrosive effect and does not distort the bristles. Discoloration is practically neglible.

We claim:

1. The method of making a self-sterilizing brush which comprises treating the bristles with a solution of a phenyl mercuric salt, and treating the bristles with an agent adapted to react with the phenyl mercuric salt to form a phenyl mercuric salt which is less soluble in water.

2. The method of making a self-sterilizing brush which comprises treating the bristles with an oxidizing agent and a solution of a phenyl mercuric salt, and treating the bristles with an agent adapted to react with the phenyl mercuric salt to form a phenyl mercuric salt which is less soluble in water.

3. The method of making a self-sterilizing brush which comprises treating the bristles with a solution or a phenyl mercuric salt, and subjecting the bristles so treated to the action of a solution oi a salt 01' a halogen to convert the phenyl mercuric salt to a phenyl mercuric salt less soluble in water.

4. The method of making a self-sterilizing brush which comprises treating the bristles with an oxidizing agent and a solution of a phenyl mercuric salt, and subjecting the bristles so treated to the action of a solution of a salt of a halogen to convert the phenyl mercuric salt to a phenyl merbrush which comprises treating the bristles with an aqueous solution ota phenyl mercuric salt, and subjecting the bristles so treated to the action of asolution of a halogen containing compound to convert the phenyl mercuric salt to a phenyl mercuric salt less soluble in water.

WARREN E. HILL. FREDERIC A. PARKHURST.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423121 *16 May 19421 Jul 1947Sowa Frank JReaction product of phenyl mercury salts with hydroxy alkyl amino compounds and their preparation
US2479275 *16 Mar 194516 Aug 1949Frank J SowaFungicidal composition comprising a phenyl mercury salt and excess lactic acid
US2507299 *9 May 19469 May 1950Prophy Lac Tic Brush CompanyNylon article rendered self-sterilizing by treatment with an aryl mercuric compound and method of making it
US2562488 *6 Oct 194731 Jul 1951Bactericidal Res IncGermicidal reaction products of silver salts and monohydroxy-monoamino alkanes
US2836516 *2 May 195527 May 1958Weco Products CompanyMethod of treating nylon bristles and products produced thereby
US2901392 *14 Jul 195425 Aug 1959Gallowhur Chemical CorpOrganic mercury solutions and method of preparing the same
US2938814 *19 Jul 195431 May 1960Gallowhur Chemical CorpMethod of producing antiseptic articles
US2965912 *19 Jul 195427 Dec 1960Gallowhur Chemical CorpAntiseptic brushes and other articles
US3294099 *19 May 196427 Dec 1966Leon PollackBrush-type hair curler having self-sterilizing bristles
US4862832 *19 Feb 19885 Sep 1989Ciba-Geigy CorporationComb or brush for applying insecticides or acaricides to mammals
US5320842 *2 Nov 199214 Jun 1994Gillette Canada Inc.Anti-microbial
US5340581 *15 Jun 199223 Aug 1994Gillette Canada, Inc.Sustained-release matrices for dental application
US5565206 *11 Mar 199415 Oct 1996Gillette Canada Inc.Ionic microbiocide absorbed, bonded on ion exchange resin
US5605756 *23 Mar 199525 Feb 1997Gmz Holding CompanyGrafting monomers to bristles
US5720941 *6 Jun 199524 Feb 1998Gillette Canada Inc.Polymeric particles for dental applications
US5723132 *6 Jun 19953 Mar 1998Gillette Canada Inc.Sustained-release matrices for dental application
US5783249 *1 Nov 199621 Jul 1998Gmz Holding CompanyDisposable toothbrush having mint flavored toothpaste composition bonded to bristles thereof
US5851551 *21 Jun 199422 Dec 1998The Gillette CompanySustained-release matrices for dental application
US5888578 *12 Jun 199830 Mar 1999Gmz Holding CompanyUsing free radical catalyst
US5906834 *9 Oct 199625 May 1999The Gillette CompanyColor changing matrix as wear indicator
US5998431 *16 Apr 19987 Dec 1999Gillette Canada Inc.Sustained-release matrices for dental application
US733866415 Sep 20034 Mar 2008The Gillette CompanyA sustained-release matrix for dental application includes either an anti-microbial agent or a colorant that is released from the matrix when the matrix contacts water; include a water-soluble polymer and a water-insoluble support resin
DE1051794B *2 May 19565 Mar 1959Weco Products CompanyVerwendung von Phenylmercuriverbindungen zum Impraegnieren von Superpolyamidborsten
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/337, 8/128.1, 8/116.1, 427/2.29, 132/162, 132/163, 514/496, 15/159.1, 422/37, 300/21
Cooperative ClassificationD06M13/188