Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100299411 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/852,162
Publication date25 Nov 2010
Filing date6 Aug 2010
Priority date13 Jun 2003
Also published asUS7437458, US7797401, US20080320144
Publication number12852162, 852162, US 2010/0299411 A1, US 2010/299411 A1, US 20100299411 A1, US 20100299411A1, US 2010299411 A1, US 2010299411A1, US-A1-20100299411, US-A1-2010299411, US2010/0299411A1, US2010/299411A1, US20100299411 A1, US20100299411A1, US2010299411 A1, US2010299411A1
InventorsHugh Donal STEWART, Gregory Allan SIDEBOTTOM, Wladimir de Lara Filho ARAUJO, Steffen Georg RIES, Scott Joseph STEVENS
Original AssigneeJuniper Networks, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Systems and methods for providing quality assurance
US 20100299411 A1
Abstract
A network includes a media server and a service activation device. The media server may receive a request for content from a subscriber device and transmit a message. The message may identify the subscriber device and include information relating to the content. The service activation device may receive the message from the media server, identify, in response to receiving the message, bandwidth and quality of service requirements for the content, determine whether resources needed to provide the identified bandwidth and quality of service requirements exist, reserve the resources when the resources needed to provide the identified bandwidth and quality of service requirements exist, and transmit a second message to the media server in response to reserving the resources. The second message may cause the media server to provide the content to the subscriber device.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(2)
1. A server comprising:
first logic configured to receive a message identifying a subscriber device and including information relating to the content requested by the subscriber device; and
second logic configured to:
determine whether adequate resources exist for providing the requested content to the subscriber device, and
reserve the resources when adequate resources are determined to exist.
2-14. (canceled)
Description
    RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    The present application is a divisional application of and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/460,158, filed Jun. 13, 2003, the entire contents of which are incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to network communication and, more particularly, to systems and methods for providing quality assurance in providing network content.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Networks, such as the Internet, have become an increasingly important part of our everyday lives. Millions of people now access the Internet on a daily basis to shop for goods and services, obtain information of interest (e.g., streaming video and/or audio), and communicate with friends, family, and co-workers (e.g., via e-mail).
  • [0004]
    Currently, when an individual wishes to purchase a product or simply find information on the Internet, the individual enters into his/her web browser a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) pertaining to a web site of interest in order to access that particular web site. The individual then determines whether the information of interest is available at that particular web site.
  • [0005]
    For example, suppose an individual wishes to view a live television broadcast via the Internet. The individual accesses the Internet and types in a URL associated with a web site providing the live television broadcast. The individual may then access that web site's home page to begin viewing the live television broadcast.
  • [0006]
    In some situations, the individual may not have the necessary network resources (e.g., bandwidth) available for viewing the live television broadcast. The lack of adequate resources may cause the live television broadcast to be choppy or fail to play all together, thereby diminishing the individual's viewing experience. The individual's satisfaction may be further diminished when the individual paid for the live television broadcast.
  • [0007]
    Therefore, there exists a need for systems and methods that improve the providing of multimedia content over a network.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    Systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention address this and other needs by improving the delivery of multimedia content over a network. In exemplary implementations, a quality assurance module determines whether adequate resources for handling requested content are available prior to providing the content to a subscriber. If adequate resources are available and have been reserved, the quality assurance module authorizes the delivery of the content. If, on the other hand, adequate resources are unavailable, the quality assurance module denies the delivery of the requested content.
  • [0009]
    In accordance with the principles of the invention, a method for providing content in a network is provided. The method includes receiving a request for content from a subscriber device, identifying network resources for the content, determining whether the identified network resources exist for the request, reserving the identified network resources when the identified network resources exist, and providing the content to the subscriber device in response to reserving the identified network resources.
  • [0010]
    In another implementation consistent with the principles of the invention, a server includes first logic and second logic. The first logic is configured to receive a first request for content from a subscriber device and forward information relating to the first request. The second logic is configured to receive the information; generate a second request in response to receiving the information, where the second request identifies the subscriber device; transmit the second request to a remote device, where the second request causes the remote device to determine whether adequate resources exist for providing the content to the subscriber device and reserve the resources when adequate resources are determined to exist; receive from the remote device information indicating that adequate resources have been reserved; and forward a message to the first logic in response to receiving the information from the remote device. The first logic provides the content to the subscriber device when adequate resources have been reserved.
  • [0011]
    In yet another implementation consistent with the principles of the invention, a server includes first logic and second logic. The first logic is configured to receive a message identifying a subscriber device and content requested by the subscriber device. The second logic is configured to determine whether adequate resources exist for providing the requested content to the subscriber device and reserve the resources when adequate resources are determined to exist.
  • [0012]
    In still another implementation consistent with the principles of the invention, a network includes a media server and a service activation device. The media server may receive a request for content from a subscriber device and transmit a message. The message may identify the subscriber device and include information relating to the content. The service activation device may receive the message from the media server, identify, in response to receiving the message, bandwidth and quality of service requirements for the content, determine whether resources needed to provide the identified bandwidth and quality of service requirements exist, reserve the resources when the resources needed to provide the identified bandwidth and quality of service requirements exist, and transmit a second message to the media server in response to reserving the resources. The second message may cause the media server to provide the content to the subscriber device.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate an embodiment of the invention and, together with the description, explain the invention. In the drawings,
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 is a diagram of an exemplary system in which systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention may be implemented;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2 is an exemplary diagram of the media server of FIG. 1 in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary process for deploying the quality assurance module in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention; and
  • [0017]
    FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary process for authorizing content to a subscriber in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0018]
    The following detailed description of implementations consistent with the principles of the invention refers to the accompanying drawings. The same reference numbers in different drawings may identify the same or similar elements. Also, the following detailed description does not limit the invention. Instead, the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims and their equivalents.
  • [0019]
    Systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention improve the delivery of content to subscribers. In an exemplary implementation, a quality assurance module determines whether adequate resources for handling requested content are available prior to providing the content to a subscriber. If adequate resources are available, the quality assurance module may authorize the content request. If, on the other hand, adequate resources are unavailable, the quality assurance module may deny the content request.
  • Exemplary System
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1 is a diagram of an exemplary system 100 in which systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention may be implemented. As illustrated, system 100 may include a network 110, a group of subscriber devices 120-1 through 120-N (collectively referred to hereinafter as subscriber devices 120), a router 130, a media server 140, an application server 160, service activation engine (SAE) servers 170-1 through 170-X (collectively referred to hereinafter as SAE servers 170), an optional network information collector (NIC) 180, and an admission control device (ACD) 190. It will be appreciated that the number of devices illustrated in FIG. 1 is provided for simplicity. In practice, a typical system may include more or fewer devices than illustrated in FIG. 1. Moreover, system 100 may include other devices (not shown) that aid in the reception, processing, and/or transmission of data.
  • [0021]
    Network 110 may include one or more networks of any type, such as a Public Land Mobile Network (PLMN), Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), local area network (LAN), metropolitan area network (MAN), wide area network (WAN), the Internet, or an intranet. The PLMN may include packet-switched sub-networks, such as, for example, General Packet Radio Service (GPRS), Cellular Digital Packet Data (CDPD), and Mobile IP sub-networks.
  • [0022]
    Subscriber devices 120 may include any device capable of transmitting and/or receiving data from network 110. For example, subscriber devices 120 may include a personal computer, a laptop computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a television, a telephone device, a video game console, or the like. Subscriber devices 120 may connect to router 130 via any type of connection, such as wired, wireless, and/or optical connections. In one implementation, subscriber devices 120 may connect to router 130 through a service provider's access network (e.g., a cable modem network, a digital subscriber line access multiplexer (DSLAM), etc.).
  • [0023]
    Router 130 may include a device capable of receiving data from subscriber devices 120 and routing the data to/through network 110. Router 130 may also receive data from network 110 and route the data to the appropriate subscriber device 120. In one implementation, router 130 may include a Juniper Networks™ ERX edge router.
  • [0024]
    Media server 140 may include a computer device that provides content 150 to subscriber devices 120. In one implementation, media server 140 may include Microsoft's Windows Media® 9 Series or RealNetworks' Helix Server. Media server 140 may include a quality assurance module 145 that allows content providers (i.e., owners of media server 140) to guarantee that their subscribers (e.g., users of subscriber devices 120) receive delivery of requested content at a specific bandwidth and with a specific quality of service (QoS) profile. Quality assurance module 145 may be implemented in hardware, software, or a combination of hardware and software.
  • [0025]
    Content 150 may be located locally at media server 140 or located remotely from media server 140. Content 150 may include, for example, video-on-demand, live or pre-recorded television or radio broadcasts, streaming music, on-line gaming, or other voice and/or video content. In fact, content 150 may include any content that is stored or dynamically generated in real time on one or multiple network devices. Content 150 may include content that flows through media server 140 and content that does not flow through media server 140. In the latter case, media server 140 may control access to content 150.
  • [0026]
    Application server 160 may include a computer device that stores and runs web applications that aid in providing content from media server 140 to subscribers associated with subscriber devices 120. In one implementation, application server 160 may include one or more web services 165. Each web service 165 may provide, for example, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) interface or other type of interface, such as a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) interface, and may use a device, such as NIC 180, to locate a particular SAE server 170-1 to 170-X that is currently managing router 130 through which a specified subscriber device 120 is connecting to network 110.
  • [0027]
    SAE servers 170 may include computer devices that retrieve the appropriate service policies and subscriber profiles from, for example, a lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP) based directory and dynamically configure a router, such as router 130, to deliver a requested service to a subscriber. In one implementation, the service policies may be parameterized. For example, a service may have service policies that provide a subscriber device with Internet Protocol (IP) address X access to a bandwidth of Y bits per second for data flowing from source IP address Z. SAE servers 170 may derive the values for the parameters (e.g., X=10.10.2.3, Y=1.2 Mbps, Z=196.39.75.128) from values provided by media server 140 through web service 165. SAE servers 170 may apply such values to the parameters in the service policies before sending those polices to router 130 for configuring router 130. In addition to the above, SAE servers 170 may also generate service-usage accounting data suitable for billing purposes. It will be appreciated that router 130, quality assurance module 145, and web service 165 may also generate such data.
  • [0028]
    SAE servers 170 may each include multiple service activation components. One service activation component 175 is illustrated in FIG. 1 for simplicity, however. Service activation component 175 activates a service (e.g., making network resources available to a subscriber device 120) that requires authorization from ACD 190 and triggers reservation of bandwidth and/or QoS resources by ACD 190/SAE server 170. Service activation component 175 may be implemented in hardware, software, or a combination of hardware and software.
  • [0029]
    NIC 180 may include a distributed network component that aids in identifying a SAE server 170-1 to 170-X that is currently managing a router, such as router 130, through which a specified subscriber device 120 is connecting to network 110. NIC 180 may, for example, be implemented in software and/or hardware on different network devices in system 100. These distributed software and/or hardware components may communicate with each other and with SAE servers 170, read and write data from/to an LDAP directory, and answer requests from, for example, web service 165, regarding the identity of the one of SAE servers 170 that is currently managing router 130 through which a specified subscriber device 120 is connecting to network 110. Web service 165 may include an NIC-related component (not shown) that acts as an interface for web service 165 to NIC 180.
  • [0030]
    ACD 190 may include a distributed network component that acts to identify the network resources available along the path(s) between content 150 and subscriber device 120 for delivering requested content. ACD 190 may reserve the network resources if sufficient resources are currently available to meet the requirements for delivering the content. ACD 190 may, for example, be implemented in software and/or hardware on different network devices in system 100. These distributed software and/or hardware components may communicate with each other, with an LDAP directory, with SAE servers 170, as well as other network software and/or hardware components that have knowledge of the level of congestion in congestion points in the access network between subscriber devices 120 and router 130 and/or in network 110. Congestion points may include any type of measurable limit or restriction on network resources.
  • Exemplary Media Server Configuration
  • [0031]
    FIG. 2 is an exemplary diagram of media server 140 in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention. It will be appreciated that application server 160 and SAE servers 170 may be similarly configured. As illustrated, media server 140 may include a bus 210, a processor 220, a memory 230, an input device 240, an output device 250, and a communication interface 260. It will be appreciated that media server 140 may include other components (not shown) that aid in receiving, processing, and/or transmitting data. Bus 210 permits communication among the components of media server 140.
  • [0032]
    Processor 220 may include any type of conventional processor or microprocessor that interprets and executes instructions. Memory 230 may include a random access memory (RAM) or another type of dynamic storage device that stores information and instructions for execution by processor 220; a read only memory (ROM) or another type of static storage device that stores static information and instructions for use by processor 220; and/or some other type of magnetic or optical recording medium and its corresponding drive.
  • [0033]
    Input device 240 may include one or more conventional mechanisms that permit an operator to input information to media server 140, such as a keyboard, a mouse, a pen, a biometric mechanism, and the like. Output device 250 may include one or more conventional mechanisms that output information to the operator, including a display, a printer, a speaker, etc. Communication interface 260 may include any transceiver-like mechanism that enables media server 140 to communicate with other devices and/or systems. For example, communication interface 260 may include a modem or an Ethernet interface to a network. Alternatively, communication interface 260 may include other mechanisms for communicating via a network, such as network 110.
  • [0034]
    Execution of sequences of instructions contained in a computer-readable medium may cause processor 220 to implement the functions described below. A computer-readable medium may include one or more memory devices, such as memory 230, or carrier waves. Such instructions may be read into memory 230 from another computer-readable medium or from another device via communication interface 260. In alternative embodiments, hardwired circuitry, such as an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), may be used in place of or in combination with software instructions to implement the principles of the invention. Thus, the invention is not limited to any specific combination of hardware circuitry and software.
  • Exemplary Processing
  • [0035]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary process for deploying quality assurance module 145 in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention. Processing may begin by configuring quality assurance module 145 (act 310).
  • [0036]
    Configuration of quality assurance module 145 may be accomplished by modifying the configuration properties associated with quality assurance module 145. Quality assurance module 145 may be associated with the exemplary list of configuration properties, illustrated in Table 1.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 1
    Configuration
    Property Default Value Description
    Debug log False Indicates whether or not to log debug-
    enabled level messages.
    Debug log file Quality Assurance Module Identifies the file on media server 140
    name debug.log that contains debug-level log messages
    from quality assurance module 145.
    Web Service http://localhost/b2b/ScriptInvoker Identifies the address of web service 165
    URL via which quality assurance module 145
    will activate a service before authorizing
    delivery of content.
    Web Service Anonymous Identifies a username assigned to the
    username owner of media server 140. Application
    server 160 may enforce access controls
    based on this username. Billing records
    may be produced to include this
    username, allowing the owner of media
    server 140 to be billed.
    Web Service Secret Identifies the password, SSL certificate,
    password or other credentials used to authenticate
    the identity of the owner of media server
    140.
    SAE service QualAssur Identifies the name of the particular
    activation service activation component 175 that
    component should be invoked to activate or
    name deactivate a service that will trigger the
    reservation of network resources for a
    data stream between content 150 and a
    specific subscriber.
    SAE service QualAssurService, Defines the information to be passed to
    activation <playStop>, service activation component 175
    component <userIp>, identified by the “SAE service
    arguments <userPort>, activation component name” parameter.
    <protocol>,
    <bitRate>

    Quality assurance module 145 may be associated with other configuration properties. For example, quality assurance module 145 may also be associated with configuration properties identifying QoS profiles, or associated with a configuration property indicating the interval at which failed network connections may be retried.
  • [0037]
    The “SAE service activation component name” and the “SAE service activation component arguments” configuration properties define what information will be passed from quality assurance module 145 to web service 165. In other implementations consistent with the principles of the invention, other configuration properties may define what information may be passed to web service 165.
  • [0038]
    As defined above, the “SAE service activation component name” configuration property identifies the name of the particular service activation component 175 that should be invoked to activate or deactivate a service that will reserve network resources for a data stream between media server 140 (or other device from/to which content will be delivered) and a specific subscriber. Upon receiving this information, the SAE server (e.g., SAE server 170-X) may invoke service activation component 175 specified by quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component name” configuration property, and pass the information specified by quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component arguments” configuration property to service activation component 175.
  • [0039]
    In one implementation, service activation component 175 can be designed to invoke a number of different functions, such as starting or stopping a service for a particular subscriber in order to reserve or release network resources. After installing service activation component 175, the name of service activation component 175 may be provided to the administrator of media server 140. That name may be stored as the value of quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component name” configuration property.
  • [0040]
    After installing a service activation component 175 on SAE server 170-X, an administrator of SAE server 170-X may specify the arguments that service activation component 175 requires to an administrator of media server 140. Those arguments may be identified by the value of quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component arguments” configuration property.
  • [0041]
    The “SAE service activation component arguments” configuration property may include a list of arguments in the order that is expected by service activation component 175. Quality assurance module 145 may pass these arguments to SAE server 170-X (via web service 165) exactly as they are entered by the administrator of media server 140, unless the arguments match one of the exemplary Run-time Value Names listed in Table 2. When quality assurance module 145 detects one of these run-time value names, quality assurance module 145 may replace it with a value obtained from media server 140 before passing the argument to the service activation component 175, via web service 165. The actual value that replaces the run-time value name may be different each time a subscriber requests or cancels content delivery.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 2
    Run-time Actual Value Passed to service activation
    Value Name component 175
    <playStop> A value indicating whether the content is being played
    (i.e., started or unpaused) or stopped (i.e., paused or
    stopped). In one implementation, the actual value may
    be “PLAY” or “STOP.”
    <userIp> The IP address of the subscriber device 120 that is
    requesting a content.
    <userPort> The port number of the subscriber device 120 that is
    requesting a content.
    <bitRate> The bit rate (e.g., in decimal string form) required by
    the content. The bit rate may be expressed in bits per
    second.
    <protocol> The IP protocol that will be used to deliver the content
    to the subscriber device 120 (e.g., UDP or TCP).

    It will be appreciated that Table 2 may include other parameters that facilitate the provisioning of the access network between subscriber devices 120 and router 130 and/or network 110 for the delivery of content to a subscriber device 120 and/or the providing of the content to subscriber device 120. Once configuration is complete, quality assurance module 145 may be enabled (act 320).
  • [0042]
    In one implementation, quality assurance module 145 may be distributed as a self-installing Windows executable and deployed onto a server, such as media server 140, that is running, for example, Windows Media® Server, Series 9 or RealNetworks' Helix Server.
  • [0043]
    Quality assurance module 145 may, for example, be implemented as a. NET assembly containing a class library packaged as a dynamic link library (DLL). The DLL may be copied into the Windows file system, and its presence may be registered in the Windows registry in a well-known manner. Media server 140 may monitor the registry and notice that quality assurance module 145 exists. Media server 140 may link to quality assurance module 145, and add it to the list of plug-ins shown in the media server 140's graphical user interface.
  • [0044]
    Via the graphical user interface, media server 140 may allow quality assurance module 145 to be enabled or disabled, and to have a different configuration, for each multimedia content that is available on or through media server 140 or for which media server 140 controls access. Alternatively, quality assurance module 145 can be enabled and configured just once for all content available via media server 140.
  • [0045]
    Once quality assurance module 145 has been deployed, the administrator of media server 140 may monitor its performance to ensure that quality assurance module 145 is operating properly. Monitoring of quality assurance module 145 may, for example, be performed via a graphical user interface (GUI) associated with media server 140. In one implementation, quality assurance module 145 may produce the exemplary messages illustrated in Table 3.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 3
    Message type Destination Examples
    Warning-level Media Server GUI. Failed to open debug log file.
    Windows eventing Call to web service 165 was
    facility. rejected.
    Debug log file. Call to web service 165 failed.
    Information-level Windows eventing Opened debug log file.
    facility. Plug-in initialized.
    Debug log file. Plug-in enabled.
    Plug-in disabled.
    Plug-in shutdown.
    Debug-level Debug log file. Reacting to PLAY event.
    Authorized PLAY following
    successful call to web service.
    Reacting to STOP event (player
    has paused or stopped).
    Will call web service 165 at
    “XX” with username “XX”;
    Arguments: service activation
    component Name = XX, service
    activation component
    Args = XX.
    Service activation component
    175 invocation took XXms and
    returned: XX.
  • [0046]
    If any error occurs while attempting to authorize a request for content, quality assurance module 145 may deny the request. In some situations, quality assurance module 145 may adapt its behavior while an error condition exists. For example, if quality assurance module 145 cannot connect to web service 165, quality assurance module 145 may deny all requests to authorize content delivery immediately upon receiving the request, and not attempt to connect to web service 165 again until a predetermined time interval has elapsed. This adaptation in behavior improves system 100 performance by minimizing response times for the subscribers while an error condition exists.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary process for authorizing content to a subscriber in an implementation consistent with the principles of the invention. Processing may begin with a subscriber device 120 transmitting a request for content to media server 140 for which media server 140 controls access (act 410). For example, this content may include content that is stored or dynamically generated in real time on one or multiple network devices. The content may include content that flows through media server 140 and content that does not flow through media server 140. Subscriber device 120 may transmit the request to media server 140 in a well-known manner.
  • [0048]
    Media server 140 may receive the request from the subscriber (act 420). Media server 140 may, for example, receive the request via communication interface 260. Upon identification of the request as a request for content, media server 140 may send a “PLAY” event to quality assurance module 145 (act 420). The PLAY event may describe the content requested by subscriber device 120 and identify subscriber device 120 (e.g., by IP address). In addition, the PLAY event may include additional information that provides details about the subscriber, the requested content, media server 140 with which quality assurance module 145 is associated, the commands the subscriber has sent to media server 140, etc. Alternatively, the PLAY event may make the above information available to quality assurance module 145, by providing pointers to where the information can be retrieved from, for example, memory 230 of media server 140. In another implementation consistent with the principles of the invention, the information described above with respect to the PLAY event may alternatively be obtained from the configuration of quality assurance module 145 or elsewhere (e.g., from a remote device).
  • [0049]
    Upon receipt of the PLAY event, quality assurance module 145 may determine whether to authorize or deny the PLAY event (act 430). To make this determination, quality assurance module 145 may pass any subset of the information provided in the PLAY event to web service 165. Among other things, this information may include information sufficient to identify the network resources (e.g., bandwidth and quality of service) required for delivery of the requested content. For example, the information may identify subscriber device 120 and characteristics of the content requested by subscriber device 120. The information may directly identify the network resources needed for delivery of the content. For example, the information may directly specify that the requested content requires a specific bandwidth (e.g., a bandwidth of 1.3 Mbps). The information may also (or alternatively) indirectly specify the resources that are needed. For example, the information may specify that the requested content requires a specific bandwidth and also indicate a QoS profile with which the requested content is to be handled. The QoS profile may be defined, for example, in the LDAP directory and may specify the priority with which router 130 is to handle packets associated with the requested content relative to the delivery of other packets. In one implementation, quality assurance module 145 transmits the information to web service 165 in the form of a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) message. Other protocols may alternatively be used.
  • [0050]
    The subset of information from the PLAY event that actually gets passed to web service 165 may be determined by the configuration of quality assurance module 145. As set forth above, the “SAE service activation component arguments” configuration property may define the information to be passed to one of SAE severs 170 (e.g., SAE server 170-X) through web service 165. In addition, the SOAP message may include any other information that aids in providing the requested content to the subscriber. For example, the SOAP message may include information identifying service activation component 175 that should be invoked on SAE server 170-X that activates the providing of the requested content to the subscriber. This information may be obtained from quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component name” configuration property.
  • [0051]
    Upon receipt of the SOAP message from quality assurance module 140, web service 165 may identify, with the aid of NIC 180, the SAE server (e.g., SAE server 170-X) that manages router 130 to which the subscriber is connected. Web service 165 may then transmit the information received from quality assurance module 145 in the SOAP message to the identified SAE server 170-X. In one implementation, web service 165 transmits the information to SAE server 170-X via a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) call. Other protocols may alternatively be used.
  • [0052]
    The receipt of the CORBA call at SAE server 170-X triggers invocation of service activation component 175, identified by quality assurance module 145's “SAE service activation component name” configuration property contained within the CORBA call. Service activation component 175 may combine the information received from web service 165 with other information (e.g., information from the memory of SAE server 170-X, information from ACD 190, service and policy definitions from the LDAP directory, information about network capabilities from router 130, etc.) to identify the relevant network resources for the content requested by subscriber device 120. As set forth above, the information from quality assurance module 145 may identify some of the network resources either directly or indirectly. Service activation component 175 may then attempt to activate a service for providing the network resources required for delivery of the content requested by the subscriber. To do so, service activation component 175 may, with the aid of ACD 190, determine whether the identified network resources exist for providing the requested content.
  • [0053]
    ACD 190 may obtain information from an LDAP directory. The information may include the maximum bandwidth available at specific congestion points in the access network between subscriber devices 120 and router 130 and/or in network 110, and how much bandwidth is going to be in-use/reserved for “background” data traffic not otherwise tracked by ACD 190. Other information may be obtained from software and/or hardware designed to monitor specific network congestion points. Different congestion points (e.g., cable modems, digital subscriber line (DSL) modems, DSLAMs, etc.) may require different types of monitoring software/hardware. Each type of monitoring software/hardware may inform ACD 190 how much bandwidth is currently available at the congestion points monitored by that software/hardware. Moreover, each SAE server 170 may inform ACD 190 which services are active for each subscriber, and how much bandwidth is required for each service. ACD 190 may combine the information from these three sources to determine, given a service activation attempt for a service that requires a specific bandwidth, whether that bandwidth is currently available.
  • [0054]
    If ACD 190 determines that adequate network resources (e.g., bandwidth and/or QoS resources) are unavailable to provide the requested content, ACD 190 may deny the request. For example, if the subscriber is connected via a 750 Kbps DSL line, and has a service active that consumes 500 Kbps, and delivery of the content requires allocation of another 1 Mbps, ACD 190 may deny the service activation. On the other hand, if adequate network resources are available to provide the requested content, ACD 190 may authorize the request and reserve the necessary resources (act 440).
  • [0055]
    SAE server 170-X may transmit the result of the activation attempt (e.g., success or failure) to quality assurance module 145 via web service 165. In one implementation, SAE server 170-X may transmit the activation attempt results in a CORBA call to web service 165, which may, in turn, transmit the results to quality assurance module 145 via a SOAP message.
  • [0056]
    If the activation attempt failed (indicating that adequate resources are unavailable to handle the requested content), quality assurance module 145 may notify the subscriber of such (act 450). If, on the other hand, the activation attempt succeeded (indicating that adequate resources are available to handle the requested content and have been reserved), quality assurance module 145 may authorize the delivery of the requested content to the subscriber (act 440). Media server 140 may then begin delivery the requested content to subscriber device 120. In this way, media server 140 can guarantee that subscribers will receive delivery of requested content at a specific bandwidth and with a specific QoS profile, thereby ensuring a high-quality subscriber experience.
  • [0057]
    Later, when the subscriber stops or pauses the delivery of the content, media server 140 may pass a “STOP” event to quality assurance module 145. Quality assurance module 145 may deactivate the service that provides the network resources required for delivery of the content requested by the subscriber, which releases the network resources, in a manner similar to the service activation process described above.
  • CONCLUSION
  • [0058]
    Systems and methods consistent with the principles of the invention improve the delivery of content over a network. In an exemplary implementation, a quality assurance module may ensure that adequate network resources are available for requested content prior to providing the content to subscribers. In this way, the content provider can guarantee that the subscribers receive delivery of the content at a specific bandwidth and with a specific QoS profile.
  • [0059]
    The foregoing description of exemplary implementations consistent with the principles of the invention provides illustration and description, but is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teachings or may be acquired from practice of the invention. For example, while the above-described implementations focused on content flowing to a subscriber device 120, implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are not so limited. One skilled in the art will appreciate that implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are equally applicable to content flowing from a subscriber device 120, instead of (or in addition to) content that is flowing to subscriber device 120. For example, in a multiplayer on-line game, a subscriber device 120 may transmit data to and receive data from multiple other subscriber devices 120. In other games or virtual environments, subscriber devices 120 may send data to and/or receive data from a common server. Quality assurance module 145 may be used to ensure that the necessary network resources exist for such content flows.
  • [0060]
    Moreover, while the above description focused on a “unicast” environment (e.g., where a subscriber device 120 requests content and media server 140, in response to the request, delivers (or triggers the delivery of) the content), implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are equally applicable to a “multicast” environment, where media server 140 delivers (or triggers the delivery of) the content to whomever is interested. Media server 140 does not know which subscriber devices 120 are actually receiving the content, but rather broadcasts the content indiscriminately. In this situation, subscriber device 120 may request to receive the content via web service 165 directly, or via, for example, software running on an intermediate server or router 130. The software on the intermediate server or router 130 may transmit information similar to the information transmitted by quality assurance module 145 to either web server 165 or directly to SAE server 170-X and the process for delivering the content to the subscriber at a subscriber device 120 may proceed in a manner similar to that described above with respect to FIG. 4.
  • [0061]
    While specific devices and their corresponding functions were described above with respect to FIGS. 1-4, in other implementations consistent with the principles of the invention, some devices in FIG. 1 may perform the functions of other devices in FIG. 1. For example, quality assurance module 145 may perform the functions of web service 165, or vice versa. Therefore, implementations consistent with the principles of the invention are not limited to any particular configuration.
  • [0062]
    While series of acts have been described with regard to FIGS. 3 and 4, the order of the acts may be varied in other implementations consistent with the present invention. Moreover, non-dependent acts may be implemented in parallel.
  • [0063]
    No element, act, or instruction used in the description of the present application should be construed as critical or essential to the invention unless explicitly described as such. Also, as used herein, the article “a” is intended to include one or more items. Where only one item is intended, the term “one” or similar language is used.
  • [0064]
    The scope of the invention is defined by the claims and their equivalents.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6078953 *29 Dec 199720 Jun 2000Ukiah Software, Inc.System and method for monitoring quality of service over network
US6167438 *22 May 199726 Dec 2000Trustees Of Boston UniversityMethod and system for distributed caching, prefetching and replication
US6230200 *8 Sep 19978 May 2001Emc CorporationDynamic modeling for resource allocation in a file server
US6452915 *9 Jul 199917 Sep 2002Malibu Networks, Inc.IP-flow classification in a wireless point to multi-point (PTMP) transmission system
US6463454 *17 Jun 19998 Oct 2002International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method for integrated load distribution and resource management on internet environment
US6516350 *17 Jun 19994 Feb 2003International Business Machines CorporationSelf-regulated resource management of distributed computer resources
US6529515 *30 Sep 19994 Mar 2003Lucent Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for efficient network management using an active network mechanism
US6578068 *31 Aug 199910 Jun 2003Accenture LlpLoad balancer in environment services patterns
US6640248 *9 Jul 199928 Oct 2003Malibu Networks, Inc.Application-aware, quality of service (QoS) sensitive, media access control (MAC) layer
US6671732 *24 Jul 200030 Dec 2003Comverse Ltd.Method and apparatus for control of content based rich media streaming
US6801776 *2 Apr 20015 Oct 2004Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ)Systems and methods for dimensioning a wireless communication system
US6807156 *7 Nov 200019 Oct 2004Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ)Scalable real-time quality of service monitoring and analysis of service dependent subscriber satisfaction in IP networks
US6816903 *3 Dec 19999 Nov 2004Novell, Inc.Directory enabled policy management tool for intelligent traffic management
US6862692 *29 Jan 20021 Mar 2005Adaptec, Inc.Dynamic redistribution of parity groups
US6901448 *29 Dec 200031 May 2005Webex Communications, Inc.Secure communications system for collaborative computing
US6910074 *24 Jul 200021 Jun 2005Nortel Networks LimitedSystem and method for service session management in an IP centric distributed network
US6917979 *3 Oct 200012 Jul 2005Net2Phone, Inc.System and method for managing compliance with service level agreements
US6983449 *15 Mar 20023 Jan 2006Electronic Data Systems CorporationSystem and method for configuring software for distribution
US7024468 *27 Apr 20004 Apr 2006Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Internet usage data recording system and method with configurable data collector system
US7082102 *20 Sep 200125 Jul 2006Bellsouth Intellectual Property Corp.Systems and methods for policy-enabled communications networks
US7089290 *2 Aug 20028 Aug 2006Kontiki, Inc.Dynamically configuring network communication parameters for an application
US7103595 *22 Jan 20025 Sep 2006Anastasiadis Stergios VStreaming server
US7170905 *17 Apr 200130 Jan 2007Verizon Communications Inc.Vertical services integration enabled content distribution mechanisms
US7269657 *10 May 200211 Sep 2007Rockwell Collins, Inc.Method and system for providing a mobile IP network with non-path dependent intra domain quality of service
US7277944 *31 May 20012 Oct 2007Cisco Technology, Inc.Two phase reservations for packet networks
US7281043 *31 May 20019 Oct 2007Cisco Technology, Inc.System for sharing resources among RSVP sessions
US7293083 *27 Apr 20006 Nov 2007Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Internet usage data recording system and method employing distributed data processing and data storage
US7293109 *15 Oct 20026 Nov 2007Semandex Networks, Inc.Dynamic content based multicast routing in mobile networks
US7296091 *19 Jun 200013 Nov 2007The Trustees Of Columbia University In The City Of New YorkSystem and method for receiving over a network a broadcast from a broadcast source
US7301951 *31 Jul 200227 Nov 2007At&T Knowledge Ventures, L.P.Resource reservation protocol based guaranteed quality of service internet protocol connections over a switched network
US7310349 *16 Apr 200318 Dec 2007Nortel Networks LimitedRouting and rate control in a universal transfer mode network
US7324447 *30 Sep 200229 Jan 2008Packeteer, Inc.Methods, apparatuses and systems facilitating concurrent classification and control of tunneled and non-tunneled network traffic
US7327675 *1 Aug 20025 Feb 2008At&T Corp.Fairness of capacity allocation for an MPLS-based VPN
US7382785 *21 Feb 20033 Jun 2008At&T Knowledge Ventures, L.P.Extended virtual user-to-network interface with ATM network
US7394786 *19 Oct 20041 Jul 2008Nokia CorporationMethod and system for limiting quality of service of data transmission
US7400582 *4 Nov 200215 Jul 2008Interdigital Technology CorporationBi-directional and reverse directional resource reservation setup protocol
US7428216 *30 Sep 200223 Sep 2008Avaya Inc.Method and apparatus for policy and admission control in packet-based communication systems
US7437458 *13 Jun 200314 Oct 2008Juniper Networks, Inc.Systems and methods for providing quality assurance
US7437472 *26 Nov 200214 Oct 2008Interactive Content Engines, Llc.Interactive broadband server system
US7483981 *3 Dec 200427 Jan 2009Microsoft CorporationScalable virtual partitioning of resources
US7489687 *31 May 200210 Feb 2009Avaya. Inc.Emergency bandwidth allocation with an RSVP-like protocol
US7492720 *23 May 200117 Feb 2009Niksun, Inc.Apparatus and method for collecting and analyzing communications data
US7516198 *30 Oct 20017 Apr 2009Cisco Technology, Inc.Arrangement for providing content-based quality of service for a service flow based on parsing XML tags detected from a server response to a client request
US7552192 *18 Dec 200223 Jun 2009Ronnie Gerome CarmichaelMassively parallel computer network-utilizing MPACT and multipoint parallel server (MPAS) technologies
US7562110 *10 Jan 200214 Jul 2009F5 Networks, Inc.File switch and switched file system
US7584262 *12 Feb 20021 Sep 2009Extreme NetworksMethod of and system for allocating resources to resource requests based on application of persistence policies
US7606146 *15 Aug 200020 Oct 2009Nortel Networks LimitedMethod and apparatus for implementing a policy-based management system on a network device
US7606885 *3 Sep 200120 Oct 2009Netsocket, Inc.Method for, and a topology aware resource manager in an IP-telephony system
US7610393 *24 Feb 200027 Oct 2009Alcatel-Lucent Usa Inc.Mobile IP supporting quality of service
US7643492 *15 Oct 20015 Jan 2010Fujitsu LimitedNetwork bandwidth reservation method
US7653735 *11 Mar 200226 Jan 2010Sony Deutschland GmbhMethod for achieving end-to-end quality of service negotiations for distributed multi-media applications
US7802264 *29 Mar 200221 Sep 2010Verizon Business Global LlcMethod and system for implementing a databus in a global ecosystem of interrelated services
US7802292 *16 Jun 200321 Sep 2010At&T Mobility Ii LlcApplication of dynamic profiles to the allocation and configuration of network resources
US7822862 *9 Jun 200326 Oct 2010Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method of satisfying a demand on a network for a network resource
US7877435 *20 Jun 200225 Jan 2011International Business Machines CorporationMethod and system for transaction pipeline decomposition
US7917647 *2 Jun 200329 Mar 2011Mcafee, Inc.Method and apparatus for rate limiting
US7929562 *16 May 200319 Apr 2011Genesis Telecommunications Laboratories, Inc.Method and apparatus for optimizing response time to events in queue
US8233490 *15 May 200331 Jul 2012Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ)Method for the distribution of a network traffic according to SLA and QoS parameters
US8234650 *24 Jan 200531 Jul 2012Oracle America, Inc.Approach for allocating resources to an apparatus
US8296396 *31 Oct 200723 Oct 2012Level 3 Communications, LlcDelivering resources to clients in a distributed computing environment with rendezvous based on load balancing and network conditions
US20020152305 *30 Jan 200217 Oct 2002Jackson Gregory J.Systems and methods for resource utilization analysis in information management environments
US20020194251 *5 Apr 200219 Dec 2002Richter Roger K.Systems and methods for resource usage accounting in information management environments
US20030093515 *14 Nov 200115 May 2003Kauffman Marc W.Quality of service control of streamed content delivery
US20030097443 *21 Nov 200122 May 2003Richard GillettSystems and methods for delivering content over a network
US20030163572 *27 Jul 200128 Aug 2003Peter HierholzerMethod for establishing a connection with a predetermined service quality between communications networks with resource managers
US20030189900 *4 May 20019 Oct 2003Barany Peter A.Communications using adaptive multi-rate codecs
US20030189922 *11 Apr 20039 Oct 2003Howe Wayne R.Layer one switching in a packet, cell, or frame-based network
US20030236745 *12 Jun 200125 Dec 2003Hartsell Neal DSystems and methods for billing in information management environments
US20040111506 *10 Dec 200210 Jun 2004International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method for managing web utility services
US20050091505 *14 Jun 200428 Apr 2005Camiant, Inc.Dynamic service delivery platform for communication networks
US20050204020 *24 Mar 200515 Sep 2005O'brien BrettShared internet storage resource, user interface system, and method
USRE42204 *13 May 19998 Mar 2011Sony CorporationInformation receiving device and method, information release device, and information communication system
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Braden, R. et al. "Resource ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP) -- Version 1 Functional Specification," RFC 2205, September 1997, Pp. 1-112.
2 *Camarillo, G. et al. "Integration of Resource Management and Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)," RFC 3312, October 2002, Pp. 1-30.
3 *Chuang, John Chung-I and Sirbu, Marvin. "Distributed Network Storage with Quality of Service Guarantees," Carnegie Mellon University, 1999, Pp. 1-24.
4 *Herzog, S. "RSVP Extensions for Policy Control," RFC 2750, January 2000, Pp. 1-13.
5 *Malis, A.G. and Hsiao, T. "Protocol Extension for Support of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Service Class-Aware Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering," RFC 3496, March 2003, Pp. 1-6.
Classifications
U.S. Classification709/219
International ClassificationG06F15/16
Cooperative ClassificationH04L47/10, H04L47/803, H04L47/805, H04L45/306, H04L47/70
European ClassificationH04L12/56R, H04L45/306, H04L47/80C, H04L47/10, H04L47/80B