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Publication numberUS20090077704 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/271,922
Publication date26 Mar 2009
Filing date16 Nov 2008
Priority date17 May 2006
Also published asCA2687465A1, WO2007136801A2, WO2007136801A3
Publication number12271922, 271922, US 2009/0077704 A1, US 2009/077704 A1, US 20090077704 A1, US 20090077704A1, US 2009077704 A1, US 2009077704A1, US-A1-20090077704, US-A1-2009077704, US2009/0077704A1, US2009/077704A1, US20090077704 A1, US20090077704A1, US2009077704 A1, US2009077704A1
InventorsDavid Duncan, Robin Duncan, Richard W. Pewitt
Original AssigneeDavid Duncan, Robin Duncan, Pewitt Richard W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waterproof and High Heat Resistant Coated Gloves
US 20090077704 A1
Abstract
This invention relates to kitchen gloves for commercial, industrial and/or home use, and related uses requiring waterproof gloves or mitts with high, and low, temperature resistance; this invention also relates to mitts or puppets that have a high wear and high heat resistant material, yet can still grip.
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Claims(20)
1. A hand mitt comprising:
a first sheet and a second sheet;
the first and said second sheets comprising a solid chloride rubber material and having opposing surfaces affixed together and a common edge peripheral region defined by an edge termination of said respective first and said second sheet;
the first and second sheets are characterized as water resistant, stain resistant and insulative to heat and cold temperatures; and
a protective coating, which is carried on an exterior surface of the first and the second sheets; said protective coating comprising a chloride rubber liquid, a pH stabilizer, an emulsion stabilizing surfactant, a wetting surfactant, an accelerator, a curing agent, an anti-oxidizing agent, a biocide, and a thickener.
2. The hand mitt of claim 1, wherein the chloride rubber liquid is Neoprene 671A;
the pH stabilizer is 0.7% KOH;
the emulsion stabilizing surfactant is liquid sodium alkyl sulfate and monosodium salt of sulfated methyl oleate;
the wetting surfactant is octylphenol ethylene oxide condensate;
the accelerator is zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate;
the curing agent is sulfur and zinc oxide;
the biocide is hexahydro-1,3,5-triethyl-s-triazine;
the anti-oxidant agent is zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole plus phenolic antioxidant in an aqueous slurry; and
the thickener is non-ionic cellulose ether and liquid sodium poly-acrylate.
3. The hand mitt defined in claim 1, wherein said first and said second sheets have an irregular exterior surface chosen from raised ribs, recesses or raised waffle-type pattern; and the first and the second sheets further comprising a fabric material.
4. The hand mitt defined in claim 1, wherein the wetting surfactant is a non-ionic detergent.
5. A hand mitt comprising:
a first sheet and a second sheet;
the first and said second sheet comprising a fabric material and a first chloride rubber and having opposing surfaces affixed together and a common edge peripheral region defined by an edge termination of said respective first and said second sheet;
the first and second sheets are characterized as water resistant, stain resistant and insulative to heat and cold temperatures; and
a protective coating composition, which is carried on an exterior surface of the first and the second sheets and comprises: a second chloride rubber, a pH stabilizer, an emulsion stabilizing surfactant, a non-ionic detergent, an accelerator, a curing agent, an anti-oxidizing agent, a biocide, and a thickener.
6. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the second chloride rubber is in a liquid form;
the pH stabilizer is 0.7% KOH;
the emulsion stabilizing surfactant is liquid sodium alkyl sulfate and monosodium salt of sulfated methyl oleate;
the non-ionic detergent is octylphenol ethylene oxide condensate;
the accelerator is zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate;
the curing agent is sulfur and zinc oxide;
the biocide is hexahydro-1,3,5-triethyl-s-triazine;
the anti-oxidant agent is zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole plus phenolic antioxidant in an aqueous slurry; and
the thickener is non-ionic cellulose ether and liquid sodium poly-acrylate.
7. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein said first and said second sheets have an irregular exterior surface chosen from raised ribs, recesses or raised waffle-type pattern.
8. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the fabric material comprises nylon and polyester.
9. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the second chloride rubber is in a liquid form and the pH stabilizer is 0.7% KOH.
10. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the emulsion stabilizing surfactant is liquid sodium alkyl sulfate.
11. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the emulsion stabilizing surfactant is monosodium salt of sulfated methyl oleate.
12. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the non-ionic detergent is octylphenol ethylene oxide condensate.
13. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the accelerator is zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole.
14. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the accelerator is zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate.
15. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the curing agent is sulfur and zinc oxide.
16. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the biocide is hexahydro-1,3,5-triethyl-s-triazine.
17. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the anti-oxidant agent is zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole plus phenolic antioxidant in an aqueous slurry.
18. The hand mitt defined in claim 5, wherein the thickener is non-ionic cellulose ether and liquid sodium poly-acrylate.
19. A method of manufacturing a mitt, said mitt comprising:
a first sheet and a second sheet; the first and the second sheet comprising a chloride rubber material and having opposing surfaces affixed together and a common edge peripheral region defined by an edge termination of said respective first and said second sheet;
the first and the second sheets are characterized as being water resistant, stain resistant and insulative to heat and cold temperatures; and
a protective coating composition, which is carried on an exterior surface of the first and the second sheets, and comprises: a chloride rubber latex; a pH stabilizer; at least one emulsion stabilizing surfactant; a non-ionic detergent; at least one accelerator; at least one curing agent; a biocide agent; an anti-oxidant; and at least one thickener, wherein said steps comprising:
a. A first heating of said mitt;
b. A first cooling of said mitt;
c. Dipping said mitt into said protective coating composition;
d. Removing said mitt from said protective coating composition;
e. A second heating of said mitt, whereby said protective coating composition is first dried at a first temperature and then cured at a second temperature onto the exterior surface of said sheets of the mitt.
20. The method of manufacturing of claim 20, wherein the first temperature of the second heating is from 160 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit and the second temperature of the second heating is about 280 degrees Fahrenheit.
Description
PRIORITY CLAIM

Pursuant to MPEP 1895 and 35 U.S.C. 363 and 35 U.S.C. 120, this is a continuation in part application of PCT Patent Application No. PCT/US2007/012012, which was filed on May 17, 2007, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/801,455, which was filed on May 16, 2006 and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/801,480, which was filed on May 16, 2006; these applications are incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to kitchen gloves for commercial, industrial and/or home use, and related uses requiring waterproof gloves or mitts with high, and low, temperature resistance.

It is desirable to make kitchen gloves or mitts, or kitchen puppet style holders out of a high heat resistant, cold resistant and waterproof or liquid proof material. Neoprene® rubber, which is made by the Du Pont Company and is generically known as chloride rubber, polychloroprene or CR, is used to construct wet suits to protect against cold and water. Chloride rubber also does not typically burn or melt, although it can char (charcoal or carbonize). However, when used as a glove or mitt material, it is not fully waterproof, because there are seams. Hot liquids such as hot oil, steam and other vapors and liquids can seep through the glove, mitt or puppet at the seams. These liquids can also wick along or through the seams.

The present invention also relates to mitts or puppets that have a high wear and high heat resistant material, yet can still grip.

The present invention introduces such refinements. In its preferred embodiments, the present invention has several aspects or facets that can be used independently, although they are preferably employed together to optimize their benefits. All of the foregoing operational principles and advantages of the present invention will be more fully appreciated upon consideration of the following detailed description, with reference to the appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a top view of a mitt in accordance with a first embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 shows a side view of a gusset portion of the mitt of FIG. 1 between the lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 shows a sectional view of the gusset portion of the mitt of FIG. 1, taken along a line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 shows a partial top view of zigzag stitching and straight stitching on the inside of the seams of the mitt;

FIG. 5 is a view of the portion of FIG. 3 in circle 5, but in an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a view of a step of dipping a mitt into a chloride rubber solution for coating the mitt in accordance with a step in a method in accordance with a second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 7 is view of another step involving heating the mitt before the step of dipping of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a coated five-fingered glove in accordance with a third embodiment of the invention, and a perspective view of an uncoated mitt prior to or after the step of heating in the second embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a front view of a puppet embodiment of the invention, with the top mouth portion and bottom mouth portion of the puppet open;

FIG. 10 is a rear view of the puppet of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a view of a portion of the inside of the puppet at the puppet's mouth with a layer folded back;

FIG. 12 is a view similar to that of FIG. 11 with the layer more unfolded;

FIG. 13 is a view of the inside lining of the puppet at the mouth;

FIG. 14 is a front view of the puppet similar to FIG. 9 but showing more detail including silicone gripping nodules;

FIG. 15 is a sectional view taken along a line 7-7 of FIG. 14; and

FIG. 16 is a view of a portion of FIG. 15 in a circle 8-8.

FIGS. 17A, 17B and 18-23 show tables related to the Waterproof and High Heat Resistant Gloves Invention.

FIG. 24-28 show alternate embodiments of the glove invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Waterproof and High Heat Resistant Gloves (Duncan and Pewitt)

In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, there is a chloride rubber kitchen glove or mitt, or puppet (hereinafter “mitt” will be used, but the same applies equally to gloves and puppets). To waterproof and otherwise seal the seams, the glove is coated with a chloride rubber liquid composition, e.g., a dispersion or suspension. Suitable exemplary dispersion formulations or compositions for the chloride rubber dispersion are shown in attached FIGS. 17 through 23 incorporated by reference herein.

Chloride rubber material for kitchen mitts are a big advantage over cloth material because chloride rubber has non-absorption and non porous characteristics, which keep condiments, grease, or other food stuffs from staining the mitt surface like regular cloth oven mitts.

A problem with commercially available chloride rubber is that it contains oil or “process oil,” which affects the ability for coatings to adhere, i.e. makes it harder for the coatings to adhere. The purpose of the process oil is to soften the chloride rubber product, as in use for wet suits or clothing purposes.

However, use of this “process” oil in the chloride rubber material also causes the volatilizing of the process oil at temperatures of 250 to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, during the curing cycle after the mitts are dipped into the chloride rubber liquid composition. For example, after the mitt is sewn and dipped into the protective liquid composition, this protective layer is dried; during this drying and curing step, the volatiles of the process oil come off from the foamed chloride rubber. These volatiles tend to collect near the outer surface of the chloride rubber and “balloon away” from the “dipped on” and textured foam surface and between the original textured chloride rubber material and the curing dipped chloride rubber film; in other words, these volatiles can balloon the dipped chloride rubber film away from the original material and affect the film to film adhesion.

To avoid this “volatilizing” problem, preferably, the mitts can be formed from a foamed rubber material, which includes a softening agent, which does not volatilize until the temperatures reach near 400 degrees F.

In addition, the amount of oil in chloride rubber such as that traditionally used for clothing is reduced to a point where a chloride rubber liquid dispersion will adhere to the chloride rubber mitt.

Once coated with the protective chloride rubber coating, the mitt/tool can withstand 134 degrees below zero to about 500 degrees Fahrenheit (about 260 degrees Celsius). Note that 500 degrees Fahrenheit is listed as an upper limit for intermittent use, but most kitchen uses are in the range of 275 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Typically, inside of a glove or mitt, a user's hand will perceive pain and first degree burns at approximately 125 degrees F. inside the glove and at the wearer's skin surface.

With the protective coating, the mitt may be immersed in hot oil, such as for cleaning a fryer, e.g., a fast food restaurant's hot oil vat used for French fries, while the oil still is at or close to boiling, or at least about 350 to 360 degrees Fahrenheit. Further, in the process of canning steamed vegetables, the steamed vegetables can be handled. Also, in boiling soup or other food in a bag, the heated bag can be handled and opened without the boiling water and steam penetrating the mitt at the seams. Similarly, in the armed forces, heated rations are carried in a hot water bath and may be removed using the mitt of the invention, rather than a wire basket or the like, enabling more rations to be stored in the bath.

Preferably, as shown, e.g., in FIG. 8, the mitt, which may also be made as a glove, is made a bit longer in length. A finished mitt with the coating is shown in FIG. 8 as element 4. Also, near the end 4 a of the mitt 4, there is a cuff 8 (folded over and stitched at 8 a, FIG. 1, to the glove) to prevent liquids from flowing along the mitt and going past end 4 a onto the wearer's skin or clothes.

FIG. 2 shows a gusset 10 as a strip of material, which may go part way or all the way around the periphery of the glove, and is represented by the dark lines in FIG. 1. Gusset 10 meets the front and back main pieces of material 4 b and 4 c at seems 10.

FIG. 3 shows connection of the front material 4 b to the gusset 10 and the gusset 10 to the back material 4 c. (This material is sewn together before the coating is applied, i.e., while chloride rubber base layer 16 is still exposed.)

If no gusset is used, then front and back material (or front and back of finger portions in a glove) are connected by one seam. FIG. 3 shows the two seams 10 a where the chloride rubber material is uncoated on the inside and is sewn together by threads 11. Preferably, one thread 11 e.g., proximate the outside of the glove is non-bonded or absorbent to receive the coating in accordance with the invention, while a second thread 11 is bonded for strength at the seam. Coating 14 of the cross-linked or cured chloride rubber dispersion covers the entire exterior of the glove and penetrates or seals off each seam, except that it is preferred not to coat near end 4 a to form a cuff, as noted above. Other embodiments can have a fully coated glove.

In a further preferred version, as shown in FIG. 4, the outer stitch 11 of the seam is straight and is very close to the outside of the mitt, while the inner stitch 11′ of the seam is in a zigzag or even a double zigzag pattern, for even more strength. Note various other stitching patterns can be used.

In FIG. 5, a “foamier” version of chloride rubber 16 a or the like, is used, and chloride coating 14 is applied to rubber 16 a, in the same manner as described herein for chloride rubber 16.

Method of Manufacture:

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8, are for explaining one preferred method of making such a mitt. First, an uncoated mitt, or as shown in FIG. 8, a glove 6 (five fingered glove) is shown before the coating is applied. The mitt or glove is formed as follows:

Forming the Mitt Body:

Preferably, the chloride rubber mitts are prepared by cutting chloride rubber raw material into appropriate pieces for a mitt or glove, then folding over the edges and sewing them together (i.e., at the insides of the mitt or glove in order to minimize any exterior seams). This step of sewing or other bonding, preferably using a porous outer bonding element (e.g., stitching 11) is performed with the mitt inside out.

In addition, alternate methods of closing the seams can be used, including without limitation: gluing or binding with tape. In the preferred embodiment, a “zig zag” stitch is used for strength at the cut edges, and just inside the zig zag stitching, a straight stitch is placed with the stitches spaced closely together to assist in stopping penetration of the chloride rubber coating from penetrating into the cavity of the mitt or glove. This closely spaced straight stitching should be of a composition that will promote coagulation of the liquid chloride rubber coating on contact.

Then, the mitt or glove is inverted or turned so that the seams are inside and the textured chloride rubber is outside. The nylon or polyester textile fabric will be to the inside of the mitt or glove. This textile fabric surface is inside the glove or mitt is for comfort and ease of donning and removing the glove or mitt. Other textiles can be used in this invention, including without limitation Kevlar brand, Nomex brand, PEEK or some naturally occurring fibers; additional textiles can be employed to add flame resistance, biocide properties, cut-resistance and heat absorption.

Pre-Coating Heating Step:

Mitts 4 are mounted on heat resistant forms 20 and placed in an oven 22 in lots, e.g., in lots of twenty (for example only). Preferably, the oven is heated to a temperature and for a time sufficient to remove significant oil, e.g., to 300 degrees F., and oil is “burned off” for about 45 minutes. When excess volatiles have been removed, the mitts are removed from the forms and allowed to cool, while another batch is “burned off.” This term “burned off” is intended to mean the heating of the mitts to remove process oil.

Mitts are mounted or loaded on a rack or form holder. The forms help position the thumb in the mitt. This batch or lot-type manufacturing process and the use of forms are for example and are not intended to be limiting; continuous line manufacturing can also be employed.

Note also with use of a chloride rubber material with a lower content of process oil or a different softening agent may allow for reduction or elimination of this heating step. In other words, after the forming or sewing of the glove or mitt, the next step would be dipping or coating of the chloride rubber liquid composition.

Dipping or Coating Step:

The rubber chloride compound or composition is agitated, and pH and viscosity are selected to enable a smooth coating of desired thickness.

The mitts 4 are slowly immersed in dispersion 30 in a container 32. One exemplary rate is 10 inches per minute until the desired depth for that mitt has been reached. This slow immersion rate allows the chloride rubber dispersion to wet the textured mitt surface and flush any air in front of the wet edge. This step may take a minute or so, e.g., 72 seconds (1 min 12 sec). Note that the total time for immersion or dipping is dependent on the size or length of the product being dipped; for example, preferred lengths of the mitt product are 10, 12, 14 inches or shoulder length.

The mitts are then withdrawn or removed from the compound preferably at a like rate to the dipping rate, e.g., again 10 inches per minute. The slow withdrawal rate works with the rheology of the compound to pull most of the excess compound off the glove so there is very little drip or compound movement.

Post-Coating Drying and Curing:

Oven Drying and Curing Version One: After about 3-4 minutes, the coated mitts are then placed in the oven again at the range of 160° F. to 1800 degrees F. The oven is filled with mitts taking about 1 hour and 45 minutes and held for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, the oven is turned up to 200 degrees F. for 80 minutes. After 80 minutes, the oven is turned up to 280 degrees F. for 45 minutes. After a total of 135 minutes (2 hours 15 minutes), the last mitts then are unloaded from the oven and cooled for the coating to harden.

Oven Drying and Curing Version Two: In the alternative, the coated mitts are placed in an oven at a range of 160 to 180 degrees F. for approximately 65 to 75 minutes for drying the moisture from the liquid chloride rubber coating. Then, the oven temperature is increased to about 280 degrees F. for approximately 45 minutes to cause chemical cross-linking or curing of the protective layer. The mitts or glove are removed and allowed to cool for inspection. The mitts preferably are inspected for pinholes along the seams. One possible inspection test is a leak test. The mitt is filled with pressured air and submerged into a water bath, and the presence of air bubbles is used as the pass or the fail benchmark. Such leak type tests are well known to those in the glove or mitt industry.

The same coating process may be used by starting with mitts having chloride rubber that is lower in oil than standard. With lower oil content, the chloride rubber is stiffer, and more like chloride rubber, which would be used for a gasket or seal, than clothing or other items that are worn.

Note that the inventors have discovered that using a greater amount of soap (i.e. a non-ionic detergent like TRITON X100) during the manufacturing process using a textile material of fabric. This greater amount of soap is contrary to what is used in the industry.

Composition of Liquid Chloride Rubber:

FIG. 17A shows beginning formulations for the chloride rubber coating compound (latex, liquid, dispersion). The formulation begins with a liquid chloride rubber, such as DuPont brand neoprene latex, which is common to the glove and mitt dipping industries. The latex is stabilized with caustics and surfactants. There are cross-linking accelerators and cure ingredients, antioxidants and coloring, biocide, and rheology ingredients.

Note that the wetting agent or surfactant Triton X100 or similar materials are used at higher levels (compared to dipping formulations used to dip traditional textile substrates) to assist the coating compound to better wet the surface of the previously cured closed cell chloride rubber foam material. This elevated level of a highly proficient wetting agent like Triton X100 is not normal in dipping compounds used with textile supported gloves because a wetting agent would cause a great deal of penetration of the coating compound into the interior of the glove. Using a wetting surfactant such as Triton X100 is contrary to what is known in the art for traditional textile substrates or fabrics.

FIG. 17B shows another composition for the chloride rubber coating.

FIGS. 18-23 show formulations for dispersions of some of those ingredients used in the formulation of FIGS. 17A and 17B. There can be adjustments of active ingredients solids for ease of incorporation of ingredients.

In one preferred embodiment, the chloride rubber liquid composition can include:

a. chloride rubber material or chloride rubber latex such as Neoprene 671A (polychloroprene, anionic colloidal dispersion in water; POLY(2-CHLORO-1,3-BUTADIENE) and COPOLYMERS; Neoprene 671A liquid dispersion (LD) contains a high modulus polychloroprene homopolymer made in an anionic colloidal system; good wet gel elongation and wet gel tensile strength make wet films of Neoprene 671A resistant to gel cracking, either alone or in blends with other Neoprene liquid dispersion; 671A is used for dipped goods, construction mastics, laminating adhesives, extruded thread, impregnated paper, bonded batts and contact bond adhesives);
b. the pH stabilizer can be 0.7% KOH; the emulsion stabilizing surfactant can be DARVAN WAQ (liquid sodium alkyl sulfate from R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.) and DARVAN SMO (a monosodium salt of sulfated methyl oleate from R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.); other emulsion stabilizing surfactants can be used;
c. the accelerator can be ZMBT (zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (chemical name: 2(3H)-Benzothiazolethione, zinc salt); see R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.'s accelerator product ZETAX brand ZMBT) and Butyl Zimate (a white to cream zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate from R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.); other possible accelerators can be used;
d. the curing agents can be sulfur and zinc oxide (zinc oxide acts as a vulcanizing agent in CR and XNBR latex);
e. the biocide can be Vancide TH (hexahydro-1,3,5-triethyl-s-triazine (chemical name: 1,3,5-Triazine, 1,3,5-triethylhexahydro-) from R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.); other biocides can be used as well;
f. the anti-oxidant agent can be Vanox SPL Slurry (Zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole plus phenolic antioxidant in an aqueous slurry; a zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole white liquid from R.T. Vanderbilt Co., Inc.); other anti-oxidants can be used as well;
g. the wetting surfactant can be Triton X100 (a non-ionic detergent; an octylphenol ethylene oxide condensate; the “Triton X” series of detergents are produced from octylphenol polymerized with ethylene oxide; the number (“−100”) relates only indirectly to the number of ethylene oxide units in the structure; Triton X-100 has an “average of 9.5” ethylene oxide units per molecule, with an average molecular weight of 625); other possible wetting surfactants can be used to “wet” a rubber surface;
h. the thickener can be Bermocoll 100 or Bermocoll 200 (Bermocoll is a non-ionic cellulose ether from the AKZO NOBEL company and produced in a number of different particle sizes: powder, fine powder and extra-fine powder; users simply choose the particle size that gives their products the solubility they need; it can also be tailor-made to meet individual needs and specifications and is compatible with most binders, fillers, polymers, and surfactants used in building materials, paints and gloves; note other sizes of non-ionic cellulose ethers can be used) and Alcogum 9710 (ALCOGUM 9710 from ALCOChemical is a clear to slightly opaque liquid sodium poly-acrylate thickener (acylic acid homopolymer, sodium salt), which can be used in the thickening of natural and synthetic latexes for a wide variety of applications in coatings and rubber articles; ALCOGUM 9710 may be used to thicken styrene-butadiene, neoprene, acrylic, vinyl acetate and ethylene-vinyl acetate latex compounds); note other thickeners can be used; and
i. a coloring agent such as carbon black can also be used.

The inventors used Bermocoll and Alcogum products in a blend to obtain a certain desired rhelogy; both materials increase viscosity, but because they increase thixotropy “flow properties” at different rates, the inventors use a blend of both thickeners in the composition.

The above listed chemical company products are for example only and are not intended to be limiting. The above dipping composition can be used for a variety of different types of mitts and gloves, including mitts with gussets, puppet-style mitts, and five-finger gloves.

Some manufacturing steps: cutting chloride rubber material into the mitt/glove parts; logo or design printing on the mitt/glove parts; sewing the mitt/glove parts of the chloride rubber material into a mitt or glove; turning/inverting the mitt or glove (so as to cover any exposed seams); “burn off” or heating of mitts to remove “volatiles” or oils in chloride rubber materials while on a form; load with thumb; dip mitts into protective coating liquid composition; remove mitts from protective coating liquid composition; oven drying and oven curing of the coated mitts/gloves; unload cured mitts/gloves; inspect; attaching or bar tack sewing of the cuff and/or loop; and labeling and packing of the finished product.

The hand mitt defined can be made from more than one sheet of material and have an irregular exterior surface chosen from raised ribs, recesses or raised waffle-type pattern; these sheets can further have a fabric material backing or textile supported material.

Note that the above description for the liquid chloride rubber protective coating is specified for neoprene latex; however, other polymeric coatings, including but not limited to XNBR or SBR or natural rubber, can be used.

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High Wear and Heat Resistant Gloves with Gripping Pods (Duncan)

As shown in FIGS. 9-10 and 14, a puppet 1 for use as a kitchen tool or the like for handling hot or cold items has a mouth having an upper portion 2 and a lower portion 4. The main body 8 of the puppet may be made of a suitable hot and cold resistant material such as Neoprene® rubber made by the Du Pont chemical company, or generically known as chloride rubber. The body 8 may be made by stitching at the seams as is explained in a provisional patent application concurrently filed herewith, by folding in each layer and stitching the seams using a straight stitch and/or a zigzag or double zigzag stitch, or other suitable bonding.

U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/801,455 (Filed 17 May 2006) is entitled WATERPROOF AND HIGH HEAT RESISTANT COATED GLOVES with inventors: David D. Duncan and Richard W. Pewitt and is incorporated by reference herein.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention uses a high heat resistant and high durability material such as Nomex® 10 for the mouth of the puppet and another high heat resistant material Kevlar® 12 in the central gripping area of mouth 10 on the upper and lower portions.

This invention allows interchangeable use of Kevlar and Nomex brand materials; both materials can be coated with a silicone backing. The one advantage of Nomex is that it can be dyed into more colors than Kevlar.

In another preferred embodiment: the manufacturing steps could include having the mouth part of the mitt textile screen printed with the silicon dots/nodules, which would simplify the sewing construction and reduce the amount of heat absorbing textile materials. The silicone nodules help to restore grip (lost by the textile fabric faces) and create an additional air gap between the heat source and the surface of the mitt or glove.

The Nomex material is not very porous and is not easy to grip with. The Kevlar material also is not easy to grip with, but has more porosity. Therefore, the Kevlar is used in the gripping area, and silicone nodules 14 are formed to protrude from, but also to be rooted in, the porous surface of the Kevlar.

The Nomex area may have a lip 10 a and 10 b folded over the back side and stitched at 15 to the back chloride rubber layer 18. The folds 22 (FIG. 15) enable stitching and seams to be covered up. The stitching 24 may be straight or zigzag or other stitching or bonding. The stitching preferably passes through the Nomex 10, then the Kevlar 12, then the Nomex, then a silicone rubber layer 17, then the chloride rubber. The stitching 26 at the chloride rubber seams may also bind the edges of the Nomex 10; the silicone nodules are preferably food grade.

In addition, across the back of the puppet mouth or thumb crotch, some of the stitching was present to create a line, which would make flexing of the multilayered palm area easier. This “line” stitching for improving flexion would preferably be done only through the Nomex and Kevlar and foamed silicone layers and not the chloride rubber layer(s).

In other versions, the mitt would employ other non-stitching connection methods to secure the different material layers together; in particular, other embodiments would avoid using stitching to connect the chloride rubber layer to the other layers (Nomex and Kevlar layers); stitching may puncture the chloride rubber layer in the mid palm area, which might possibly would allow steam, liquid or stains to penetrate.

This mitt provides great gripping, with high heat resistance (i.e., significantly more than typical high kitchen temperatures of 500 degrees Fahrenheit), and wear resistance significantly greater than the typical mitt or puppet wear resistance. To provide water or liquid resistance, and a steam barrier, the folds are provided.

The silicone nodules or dots may be applied to the Kevlar using a perforated drum/rotary screen or flat bed screen and then curing in an oven. The Kevlar may be cut to size before or after applying the nodules.

There is a hand or multi-purpose mitt comprising: a first sheet and a second sheet; the first and said second sheets comprising a solid chloride rubber material and having opposing surfaces affixed together and a common edge peripheral region defined by an edge termination of said respective first and said second sheet; the first and second sheets are characterized as water resistant, stain resistant and insulative to heat and cold temperatures; and a protective coating, which is carried on an exterior surface of the first and the second sheets; said protective coating comprising a chloride rubber liquid, a pH stabilizer, an emulsion stabilizing surfactant, a wetting surfactant, an accelerator, a curing agent, an anti-oxidizing agent, a biocide, and a thickener.

Further defining the hand mitt, the chloride rubber liquid is Neoprene 671A; the pH stabilizer is 0.7% KOH; the emulsion stabilizing surfactant is liquid sodium alkyl sulfate and monosodium salt of sulfated methyl oleate; the wetting surfactant is a non-ionic detergent or octylphenol ethylene oxide condensate; the accelerator is zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate; the curing agent is sulfur and zinc oxide; the biocide is hexahydro-1,3,5-triethyl-s-triazine; the anti-oxidant agent is zinc 2-mercaptotolumimidazole plus phenolic antioxidant in an aqueous slurry; and the thickener is non-ionic cellulose ether and liquid sodium poly-acrylate.

A method of manufacturing a mitt, said mitt comprising: a first sheet and a second sheet; the first and the second sheet comprising a chloride rubber material and having opposing surfaces affixed together and a common edge peripheral region defined by an edge termination of said respective first and said second sheet; the first and the second sheets are characterized as being water resistant, stain resistant and insulative to heat and cold temperatures; and a protective coating composition, which is carried on an exterior surface of the first and the second sheets, and comprises: a chloride rubber latex; a pH stabilizer; at least one emulsion stabilizing surfactant; a non-ionic detergent; at least one accelerator; at least one curing agent; a biocide agent; an anti-oxidant; and at least one thickener, wherein said steps comprising:

a. A first heating of said mitt;
b. A first cooling of said mitt;
c. Dipping said mitt into said protective coating composition;
d. Removing said mitt from said protective coating composition;
e. A second heating of said mitt, whereby said protective coating composition is first dried at a first temperature and then cured at a second temperature onto the exterior surface of said sheets of the mitt.

For the method of manufacturing, the first temperature of the second heating is from 160 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit and the second temperature of the second heating is about 280 degrees Fahrenheit.

While the invention as described above in connection with preferred embodiments, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to those embodiments. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. Any element in a claim that does not explicitly state “means for” performing a specific function, or “step for” performing a specific function, is not be interpreted as a “means” or “step” clause as specified in 35 U.S.C. Sec. 112, Paragraph 6. In particular, the use of “step of” in the claims herein is not intended to invoke the provisions of 35 U.S.C. Sec. 112, Paragraph 6.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2013018975A1 *4 May 20127 Feb 2013CHUNG, Sun-KeeTextile fabric sheet having stain and liquid resistance and the preparation method thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/16, 2/158, 2/161.6, 2/168, 2/169
International ClassificationA41D19/02, A41D13/08, A41D19/01, A41D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/01594, A41D19/01, A41D19/01529, A41D19/01547
European ClassificationA41D19/015G, A41D19/01, A41D19/015T, A41D19/015D