Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20080232799 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/153,755
Publication date25 Sep 2008
Filing date23 May 2008
Priority date25 Apr 2002
Also published asCN1266851C, CN1453945A, DE60327575D1, EP1357683A2, EP1357683A3, EP1357683B1, US7379669, US20030231601
Publication number12153755, 153755, US 2008/0232799 A1, US 2008/232799 A1, US 20080232799 A1, US 20080232799A1, US 2008232799 A1, US 2008232799A1, US-A1-20080232799, US-A1-2008232799, US2008/0232799A1, US2008/232799A1, US20080232799 A1, US20080232799A1, US2008232799 A1, US2008232799A1
InventorsA-jung Kim
Original AssigneeSamsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for duplex communication in hybrid fiber-radio systems
US 20080232799 A1
Abstract
An apparatus and method for enabling cost-effective duplex communication by diplexing one of down stream signals for frequency up-conversion in a hybrid fiber-radio system includes diplexing an unmodulated mode signal among beating signals between a master laser and an injection-locked slave laser and using the diplexed signal for down-conversion in upstream transmission, thereby eliminating the need for expensive high-frequency local oscillators for frequency conversion. Higher radio frequency signals can be generated using beating between basic modes and satellite modes such as FWM conjugates of the master laser and slave laser. Cost-effective systems, stabilization of a light source and improved transmission performance may be achieved by using a diplexer instead of an expensive high-frequency local oscillator.
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(11)
1. (canceled)
2. An apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system, the apparatus at a remote station comprising:
an optical-to-electrical converter for converting received optical signals into electrical signals;
a diplexer for splitting data mode signals containing user source data and unmodulated mode signals;
a radio transmitter for converting the data mode signals into wireless radio signals and for transmitting the wireless radio signals wirelessly;
a radio receiver for converting received wireless radio signals into electrical signals;
a mixer for mixing diplexed signals and the electrical signals and outputting mixed electrical signals; and
a laser for converting the mixed electrical signals into optical signals.
3. (canceled)
4. A method of uplink transmission in a method for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system comprising:
(a) converting signals wirelessly received by an antenna into electrical signals;
(b) mixing diplexed unmodulated mode signals with the electrical signals to form mixed electrical signals;
(c) down-converting a signal band of data;
(d) generating optical signals with a laser driven by the mixed electrical signals;
(e) transmitting the optical signals over an optical fiber; and
(f) receiving the optical signals with a photodetector at a central office.
5. (canceled)
6. A computer-readable recording medium on which a program for executing the method claimed in claim 4 is recorded.
7. An apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system as claimed in claim 2, wherein the data mode signals are modulated data mode signals and the unmodulated mode signals are unmodulated non-data mode signals.
8. An apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system as claimed in claim 7, wherein the diplexed signals mixed by the mixer are the unmodulated non-data mode signals.
9. An apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system as claimed in claim 2, further comprising an optical routing device for launching optical signals from the laser over an optical transmission fiber.
10. A method of uplink transmission in a method for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system as claimed in claim 4, wherein unmodulated mode signals are unmodulated non-data mode signals.
11. A communication system comprising a central station and one or more remote stations, wherein each remote station includes:
an optical-to-electrical converter for converting received optical signals into electrical signals;
a diplexer for splitting data mode signals containing user source data and unmodulated mode signals;
a radio transmitter for converting the data mode signals into wireless radio signals and for transmitting the wireless radio signals wirelessly;
a radio receiver for converting received wireless radio signals into electrical signals;
a mixer for mixing diplexed signals and the electrical signals and outputting mixed electrical signals; and
a laser for converting the mixed electrical signals into optical signals.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This is a divisional application based on pending application Ser. No. 10/423,760, filed Apr. 25, 2003, the entire contents of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for enabling cost-effective duplex communication by diplexing one of down stream signals for frequency upconversion in a hybrid fiber-radio system.

2. Description of the Related Art

Increasing demands for new mobile internet services including video and interactive services have resulted in the exhaustion of the available frequency band for wireless communications, and so triggered the development of the 4th generation wireless communication system. As the next generation communication system of the IMT-2000 (International Mobile Telecommunication), micro/millimeter-wave communication utilizing signals in the band of 3 GHz to 300 GHz is drawing attention for broadband wireless communication.

However, because of its limitation on the transmission distance and need for high-frequency sources, the micro/millimeter-wave communication system must be hybrided with existing wire systems. Low-attenuation, EMI-free optical fiber transmission is considered the most promising candidate for long-haul transport of high frequency band wireless signals. Thanks to the development of optical amplifiers and WDM wavelength division multiplexing) technology, transmission capacity is remarkably increased with optical fiber communication systems. Employing optical fiber in transmitting and amplifying micro/millimeter-wave signals is advantageous in utilizing existing core optical fiber systems and mature technologies in more economical ways. In such hybrid systems, the technology for generating optical micro/millimeter-waves is the key technology for broadband communication systems.

A main issue in hybrid fiber-radio transmission systems is signal band conversion into a carrier frequency, because up/down conversion between baseband and carrier frequency in micro/millimeter-wave systems requires expensive equipment.

There are three system options: baseband signal transmission, intermediate frequency (IF) signal feeder transmission, and optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission. A disadvantage of baseband transmission is the necessary use of highly complex outdoor base stations including full SDH/SONET compliant equipment. A disadvantage of the IF feeder system is the use of moderately complex outdoor base stations including RF up/down conversion. For high radio frequency systems, however, both the baseband transmission and IF feeder transmission methods require many local oscillators to up/down convert signal frequencies into carrier frequencies. Therefore, neither baseband signal transmission nor IF signal feeder transmission are considered cost-effective solutions for pico-cell communication.

Among the system design options for the hybrid fiber-radio system, generating and transmitting optical micro/millimeter-wave signals has many advantages. For example, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system requires relatively simple outdoor base stations with compact remote antenna units. In an optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system, signals at carrier frequencies are optically generated with light sources at a central office (CO) and transmitted through optical fibers to a remote station (RS), where the signals are simply optical to electrical converted (O/E-converted). Therefore, using a micro/millimeter-wave transmission system can reduce loads of many RSs in pico-cell communication networks. Moreover, as the high-frequency optical signals are generated at a central station, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system is not only cost-effective and efficient, but also allows a centralized system to be implemented. With control functions at the central station, channel allocation, hand-over, and antenna positioning can be easily controlled, and the number of subscribers that the system can support is increased.

In addition to the advantage of easy system maintenance, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system has transparency to modulation types. Since the generated optical signals are modulated by electrical baseband signals, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system is flexible to any type of modulation format. With these advantages, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system enables cost-effective and efficient communication and provides flexibility to radio access systems. Thus, the method of optical micro/millimeter-wave generation and transmission has been applied to mobile communications and wireless subscriber loops such as mobile LANs or broadband wireless local loops (B-WLL) or LMDS systems.

Despite its many advantages, the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system has problems in upstream transmission from a subscriber to a head end, because in upstream transmission, it is necessary to generate an optical micro/millimeter-wave in a remote base station, which may increase the cost of RSs. Therefore, it is difficult to apply the optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission system to duplex communication systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

To solve the above-described problems, it is a feature of an embodiment of the present invention to provide an apparatus and method for enabling duplex communication by generating and diplexing optical micro/millimeter signals in a hybrid fiber-radio system. In particular, it is a feature of an embodiment of the present invention to provide an efficient method for enabling duplex communication by generating signals in a carrier frequency mode and in side-band modes. One of the generated modes is diplexed with a diplexer, and is used for down-conversion in upstream transmission, thereby eliminating the need for expensive high-frequency local oscillators for frequency conversion.

In an effort to achieve the feature described above, in one embodiment of the present invention there is provided an apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system, the apparatus at a central office including a central station including an electrical signal source unit for generating electrical RF signals; a master laser (ML) driven by the electrical RF signals for generating optical signals; a local oscillator for generating intermediate frequency signals; a modulator for converting user binary data into modulated data signals; a mixer for mixing the intermediate frequency signals and the modulated data signals; a slave laser (SL) for outputting the optical signals at a lasing frequency and the modulated data signals at a down-converted frequency; an optical routing device for feeding signals from the ML to the slave laser 16 and for launching signals from the slave laser 16 over an optical transmission fiber; and a photodetector for receiving an optical signal from an upstream link.

In another embodiment, there is provided an apparatus for duplex communication in a hybrid fiber-radio system, the apparatus at a remote station including an optical-to-electrical (O/E) converter for converting received optical signals into electrical signals; a diplexer for splitting modulated data mode signals containing user source data and unmodulated non-data mode signals; a radio transmitter for converting the data mode signals into wireless radio transmission signals and transmitting the radio transmission signals wirelessly; a radio receiver for converting received wireless radio transmission signals into electrical signals; a mixer for mixing the unmodulated non-data mode signals from the diplexer and the electrical signals from the radio receiver; and an optical transmitter for generating optical signals modulated by the mixed electrical signals.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art by describing in detail preferred embodiments thereof with reference to the attached drawings in which

FIG. 1 illustrates a configuration of a central station according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a remote base station according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of a transmitting method according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a flowchart of a receiving method according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 shows the spectrum of optical signals according to the present invention;

FIG. 6 shows the spectrum of RF signals according to the present invention;

FIGS. 7( a)-7(f) show the spectrum of optical signals measured by a Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometric analyzer for various modulating RF source powers according to the present invention; and

FIGS. 8( a)-8(f) show the spectrum of RF signals measured by a RF analyzer for various modulating RF source powers according to the present invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a recording medium.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Korean Patent Application No. 2002-22704, filed on Apr. 25, 2002, and entitled: “Method And Apparatus For Duplex Communication In Hybrid Fiber-Radio System” is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

The present invention will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which preferred embodiments of the invention are shown.

FIG. 1 illustrates a configuration of a central station in a hybrid fiber-radio system for duplex communication. The central station includes a master laser 12 and a slave laser 16. A radio frequency source unit 11 generates electrical signals at a radio frequency and is connected to the master laser 12. The radio frequency source unit 11 drives the master laser 12 using a direct modulation method. An optical signal output from the master laser 12 is injected into the slave laser 16 by the routing operation of an optical circulator 17, and mode locks the slave laser 16. A modulated data signal from a modulator 14 and a signal from a local oscillator (LO) 13 are mixed by a mixer 15, which outputs a mixed signal. For example, quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) may be employed as a typical modulation method for wireless systems, but other modulation formats are acceptable for the implementation of the present invention. QPSK is a digital frequency modulating technique in which two bit data of 0 and 1 of digital signals are modulated as one of four phases of a carrier frequency wave.

The mixed signal is further applied to the slave laser 16 to modulate the slave laser and then modulated signals are generated at a frequency translated from a lasing frequency of the slave laser 16, fSL by the frequency of the local oscillator 13, fLO. The output from the slave laser 16 is composed of a non-data mode signal injection-locked by the master laser 12, and data mode signals modulated and band-shifted by the modulator 14 and the local oscillator 13. The output signals are then transmitted through an optical fiber by the routing operation of the optical circulator 17. Instead of the optical circulator 17, a coupler having an isolator may be used as a device for applying an optical signal from the master laser 12 to the slave laser 16. The slave laser 16 for the above operation may be either a Fabry Perot Laser Diode (FP-LD) or a Distributed Feed Back Laser Diode (DFB-LD) without an internal isolator so that an external optical signal can be injected thereto. A cost-effective FP-LD is used when only digital signals are forwarded, while a DFB-LD may be used for the purpose of transmitting analog broadcasting signals such as in video broadcasts.

For uplink transmission, the central station includes a photodetector 18, which receives signals from a RS.

FIG. 2 illustrates a remote base station in a hybrid fiber-radio system for duplex communication according to an embodiment of the present invention. The optical signals output from the slave laser 16 are transmitted over the optical fiber and are received by the remote base station. Then, each optical signal is converted into an electrical signal by an optical-to-electrical (O/E) converter 21, and then demultiplexed by a diplexer 22 into an unmodulated non-data mode signal and a modulated data mode signal containing user source data. The modulated data mode signals are transmitted to a radio transmitter 23. The radio transmitter 23 including an antenna converts the modulated data mode signals, which are electrical, into wireless radio signals and broadcasts them. The unmodulated non-data mode signal, which is band-shifted, is diverted and used as a local oscillator for upstream transmission.

In uplink communication, a radio receiver 24 converts signals received through the antenna into electrical signals. A mixer 25 mixes the electrical received signal and the unmodulated non-data mode signal output from the diplexer 22. The unmodulated non-data mode signal is used as a local oscillator that shifts a carrier frequency during down conversion. The mixed intermediate frequency (IF) signal is supplied to an optical transmitter 26, a laser which generates an optical signal, which is then transmitted through the optical fiber to the photodetector 18 corresponding to a receiver in the central station. A filter for uplink and downlink can be achieved using a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) coupler.

The electrical RF signal source unit 11 driving the master laser 12 in the hybrid fiber-radio system for duplex communication is employed to generate side-band modes of the master laser 12 and to stabilize signals from the slave laser 16 by means of injection locking. The photodetector 18, which is governed by a square law, uses a direct detection method to detect a master laser signal, a slave laser signal, and four-wave mixing (FWM) signals, and also measures beat signals that are generated from beating between these signals. That is, when a continuous wave is generated by an adjustment in a bias current and operating temperature of the master laser 12 and injected into the slave laser 16, non-degenerated FWM conjugates having frequencies of a difference between lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16, i.e., fML−fSL, and the sum of the lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16, i.e., fML+fSL, are generated due to the non-linear characteristics of the semiconductor laser. The photon density in a cavity of the slave laser 16 oscillates with a frequency of a difference between the lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16. Beat signals between the NDFWM conjugate signals as well as peak signals of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16 are detected. The beat signals have different sources, and thus coherency is weak. Accordingly, they have low stability or purity. In order to stabilize the beat signals and reduce phase noise, the master laser 12 is connected to the RF source unit 11 so that a signal can be directly and electrically modulated. In this operation, side bands are formed around a lasing frequency with frequency modulation (FM) in the master laser 12, and these modes are injected into the cavity of a slave laser 16. One of the side-band modes of the master laser 12 locks the lasing mode of the slave laser 16 at a peak frequency and coherency between the two sources is achieved. As a result, as well as the basic mode of the slave laser 16 and the master laser 12, satellite modes including FWM overlapping with the side bands of the master laser 12 are mode-locked as well, and so the output beat signals are stabilized, having low fluctuation and phase noise.

The present invention is based on the fact that FM side band modes generated at a laser that is directly modulated by a RF source signal are used to lock another laser to thus generate a high frequency beat signal that is an unmodulated non-data signal. The present invention is also based on the fact that a band-shifted signal that is generated by mixing an IF signal generated from a local oscillator with a modulated signal containing user source data is transmitted as a downlink signal. Finally, the present invention is based further on the fact that the unmodulated non-data signal is diplexed so that it is used as a local oscillator for down conversion of an uplink signal when an uplink signal is transmitted.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of a transmitting method performed throughout a central station, an optical fiber, and a remote base station during duplex fiber-radio communication according to an embodiment of the present invention. A central station generates a radio frequency source signal acting as a stable guide frequency in step 301. A master laser converts the radio frequency source signal into an optical signal in step 302. In the meantime, a local oscillator generates an IF signal in step 303. User source data is converted into a QPSK modulated signal in step 304. The IF signal and the QPSK modulated signal are mixed in step 305. Next, a slave laser converts the mixed signal into a non-data mode optical signal and a data mode optical signal in step 306. The non-data mode optical signal and the data mode optical signal are modulated using the output of the master laser and transmitted to an optical fiber by the routing operation of an optical circulator in step 307. The optical signal received through the optical fiber is converted into an electrical transmission signal in step 308. A diplexer divides the electrical transmission signal into a data mode signal containing the user source data and a non-data mode signal containing the radio frequency source signal in step 309. The data mode signal is converted into a radio transmission signal and is then transmitted wirelessly in step 310.

FIG. 4 is a flowchart of a receiving method during duplex fiber-radio communication according to an embodiment of the present invention. A signal wirelessly received through an antenna is converted into an electrical reception signal in operation 401. An existing non-data mode signal containing a radio frequency source signal, which has been obtained by the dividing operation of a diplexer, is mixed with the electrical reception signal in operation 402. A transmission laser converts the mixed signal into an optical signal and transmits the optical signal to an optical fiber in operation 403. An optical detector receives the optical signal from the optical fiber in operation 404.

To summarize the operation of a down link signal transmission, in a central station, a master laser driven by a RF source generates an optical signal, which is injected into a slave laser 16 and locks the lasing mode of the slave laser 16, and-in turn, an unmodulated optical beat signal with low phase noise is generated. A local oscillator generates an IF signal. User source data is converted into a modulated signal by a modulator. The IF signal and the modulated signal from the modulator are mixed. The mixed signal is fed to a slave laser, and the output is a data modulated signal at the lower side-band. The unmodulated mode signal and the data mode signal are transmitted over an optical fiber with the routing operation of an optical routing device. The optical signal received through the optical fiber is converted into an electrical transmission signal. A diplexer splits the electrical transmission signal into the data mode signal containing the user source data and an unmodulated mode signal. The data mode signal is converted into a radio signal and is then transmitted wirelessly.

The uplink transmission process in duplex fiber-radio communication according to an embodiment of the present invention is explained as follows. Signals that are wirelessly received by an antenna are converted into electrical signals. Diplexed unmodulated non-data mode signals are mixed with the received electrical signals and the signal band of the data is down-converted. A laser converts the electrical signals into optical signals and transmits them over an optical fiber, and a photodetector at a central office receives the optical signals.

FIG. 5 shows the spectrum of optical signals according to the present invention and FIG. 6 shows the spectrum of RF signals according to the present invention.

As described above, in a master laser to which a RF source fm is connected, frequency modulated side bands are formed at intervals of fm with a center frequency of the lasing frequency fML of the master laser 12 as the result of frequency modulation. When outputs of the master laser are injected into a slave laser and a lasing frequency of the slave laser is within locking range of the modes of the inputs, a peak mode of the slave laser 16 is locked.

On the other hand, if the slave laser is modulated by a mixed signal of a data signal and an IF signal from a local oscillator, the output signal of the slave laser is down-converted at a frequency shifted by the frequency of the local oscillator fLO from a frequency fSL of the slave laser, i.e., fSL−fLO. When these signals are transmitted to a receiver, beat signals are detected in a photodetector. These beat signals are induced from different sources but have coherency due to mode locking of the slave laser 16 and the master laser 12 so that stability and purity of the beat signal are enhanced. The detected radio frequency signals include unmodulated mode signals of fML−fSL and modulated data mode signals of fSL−fLO. The data mode signal is sent to a radio (micro/mm) transmitter, converted into a wireless radio signal, and then distributed. The unmodulated mode signal is diplexed by a diplexer to substitute for a local oscillator.

In uplink communication, a signal received by an antenna is converted into an electrical signal. The electrical signal is down-converted by mixing with an unmodulated mode signal of fML−fSL and then modulates an uplink laser signal at a remote station. An optical signal is transmitted over an optical fiber and is received by a photodetector at a central office.

Another method to generate a high frequency signal such as micro/mm-wave is by beating between satellite modes such as FWM.

As described above, a high radio frequency can be generated by beating among basic modes. However, higher radio frequency can be generated using beating among the basic modes and a satellite mode such as FWM.

A continuous wave is generated by adjusting operating temperature or laser diode bias so that the lasing frequency of the master laser is sufficiently higher than the lasing frequency of the slave laser to achieve positive detuning (fML>fSL). When the continuous wave is applied to the slave laser, almost pure FWM conjugate signals having frequencies of various combinations of fML and fSL are generated due to non-linearity of a semiconductor laser. Here, since a photon density within the cavity of the slave laser vibrates at a frequency of about a difference in lasing frequency between the master laser and the slave laser, beat signals among the FWM conjugate signals are detected in a direct detector complying with a square law.

FIG. 7( a) shows a spectrum of the peaks of continuous waves each generated by the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16 and FWM conjugate modes appearing when the continuous waves interact with each other. The separation of the lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16 does not allow injection locking initially. fI and fJ are FWM conjugate frequencies.

An interval between fI and fML is the same as an interval between fJ an fSL and the interval between the lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16. The frequency fSL of an optical signal generated by the slave laser 16 shifts to a lower frequency due to a reduction in the carrier density of the slave laser 16 when the laser light generated by the master laser 12 is injected into the cavity of the slave laser 16, the effect of which is called ‘red shift’. Since the laser light injected into the slave laser 16 serves as a pump signal for FWM, not as a master laser for locking, the beat signals generated by the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16 have serious fluctuation and phase noise because of lack of coherency. In experiments, the fluctuation is in the order of tens of MHz for the beat signals of tens of GHz.

FIGS. 7( b) and 7(c) are the spectrum of optical signals generated by the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16, respectively, when they are driven by the electrical signals at a RF band. In direct modulation of RF signals, frequency modulation as well as intensity modulation occurs only to cause sideband modes appearing around the lasing frequencies of the master laser 12 and the slave laser 16 at an interval of RF modulation frequency fm.

FIG. 7( d) shows the red shift that appears in the frequency fSL generated by the slave laser 16 due to injection locking. When the signals of the master laser 12 are injected to the slave laser 16, one of the sideband modes of the slave laser 16 is coupled with and locked to one of those of the master laser 12. Accordingly, fSL is shifted to fSL′ which is located at a multiple of RF-modulation frequency fm from fML, and then the output signals from the slave laser 16 are locked. The injection locking is achieved when the sideband modes of the master laser 12, which is injected to the slave laser 16, are superposed within the locking range and coupled with some of the sidebands of the slave laser 16. With the injection locking of the side modes of fML, fSL is shifted to fSL′ the difference between which and the master laser frequency fML is a multiple of RF-modulation frequency fm. The more increased the power Pm of the RF-modulation signal is, the further red-shifted fSL and its side modes are, and the stronger coupling and locking of the slave laser with the master laser are.

As fSL is shifted to fSL′, the FWM conjugate mode frequencies fI and fJ are shifted to fI′ and fJ′, respectively, and then locked with each other. Accordingly, the difference between the master/slave laser and its adjacent FWM conjugate mode is adjusted from fb to fb′ that is a multiple of the RF-modulation frequency fm. All the FWM conjugate modes are locked with one another, and can generate stable beat signals with reduced phase noise.

FIGS. 7( a)-7(f) and FIGS. 8( a)-8(f) are spectrum of the outputs from the slave laser 16 which are measured with an optical spectrum analyzer (not shown), and an RF spectrum analyzer (not shown), respectively, when the laser light from the master laser 12 is injected into the slave laser 16 according to the present invention. In detail, FIG. 7( a) and FIG. 8( a) are the output spectrum from the slave laser 16 where no RF-modulated signal is supplied to the slave laser 16. FIG. 7( b) through (f) and FIG. 8 (b) through (f) are the output spectrum from the slave laser 16 when the RF-modulated signals are supplied to the slave laser 16 with the power Pm of (b) 5 dBm, (c) 8 dBm, (d) 10 dBm, (e) 12 dBm and (f) 16 dBm, respectively.

As shown in FIG. 7( a) and FIG. 8( a), when the RF-modulating source is not connected to the slave laser 16, the outputs are the master/slave laser signals of frequencies fSL, fML, their FWM conjugate mode signals, and the beat signals of a frequency of 13.8 GHz.

If the master and slave lasers are both directly modulated with the RF source of a frequency fm of 3 GHz, the frequency fSL is shifted to a lower frequency as shown in FIGS. 7( b) and 7(c). As the power Pm of the RF-modulating signal increases, fSL is further shifted to the lower frequency. This red shift of the lasing frequency of the slave laser 16 can also be shown in FIGS. 8( b) and 8(c), in that the frequency of the beat signal increases as the power Pm increases.

As seen in FIGS. 8( b), (c) and (f), because of the electrical RF modulation, additional modes are generated and measured at the intervals fm from the main beat signal (of a frequency of a difference between the master and the slave laser frequencies) and a multiple of the modulated frequency, which are due to the higher order harmonics of the modulated signal. The additional mode shown in FIGS. 8( b), (c) and (f) is not superposed on the main beat signal mode, meaning that the main beat signal is not locked to the modulated signal and the other modes are just the higher order harmonics, that is, a multiple of fm.

Peripheral modes around the main beat signal are shown in FIGS. 8( c) and 8(f), due to the back reflection by the surface of the optical fiber pigtail of the slave laser 16 having no internal isolator.

As the power Pm is increased, the sideband modes of the slave laser 16 are red-shifted and locked to those of the master laser 12. Once locking is achieved, fSL is fixed at the spectral position 15 GHz (a multiple of fm) off from fML as shown in FIGS. 7( d) and 7(e).

In FIGS. 8( d) and 8(e), the beat signal generated within the locking range has much less phase noise and no peripheral modes around it. In the case of Pm=12 dBm (FIG. 8( e)), the phase noise of the RF signal is −96 dBc/Hz at an offset frequency of 100 kHz from 15 GHz. In addition, while the line width of the unlocked signal in FIG. 8( a) is about 4 MHz, that of the locked signal is limited mainly by the resolution of the RF spectrum analyzer. Accordingly, it is noted that the present invention can also contribute to reducing line width of micro/millimeter-wave band signals. As shown in FIGS. 8( d) and 8(e), the power of the beat signal increases remarkably, which means that the output signal results from locking. As long as the sideband modes of the slave laser 16 are locked, the frequency fSL is not further shifted with the increased Pm. In the experiment, the locking behavior in the slave laser 16 was maintained over a range of 10 dBm<Pm<13.5 dBm. But the locking condition was broken and the slave laser 16 got further red-shifted when the power Pm was greater than 13.5 dBm, as shown in FIG. 7( f) and FIG. 8( f).

In result, it is possible to generate stable micro/millimeter-wave band signals having less phase noise over a locking region of Pm of 10˜13.5 dBm. Also, signals of 30, 45 and 60 GHz can be generated by beat signals between the FWM conjugates. Thus, a wide frequency range of generated signals can be achieved by the present invention.

According to the present invention, in optical micro/millimeter-wave transmission in a hybrid fiber-radio system, a satellite side mode generated by two lasers and an IF local oscillator is diplexed and is then used to up-convert frequencies of upstream signals, so efficient duplex communication can be accomplished. By using a diplexer instead of an expensive high-frequency local oscillator, a cost-effective system can be built. The present invention also stabilizes a light source, reduces signal deterioration by suppressing a non-linearity effect, and allows radio frequency conversion.

In addition to the above-described effects, the present invention provides a simple and efficient duplex transmission system which does not need a plurality of high-frequency sub IF oscillators in a remote base station, and increases flexibility of a broadband radio communication system such as a broad-wireless local loop (B-WLL) and so can be widely applied to broadband wireless systems. When beat signals between satellite modes such as FWM conjugate modes are used, the present invention can generate signals at a higher frequency like, such as a millimeter wave frequency. By the method according to the present invention, a locking range is as wide as 30 GHz by feeding a signal from a master laser 12 with a high power thereby allowing ease of control and tuning. The present invention contributes to the stabilization of a light source and so reduces phase noise and frequency fluctuation of the light source. The present invention also reduces third order inter modulation distortion (IMD) to increase a spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR), thereby accomplishing high-quality communication. Since a chirp of the light source is reduced, transmission dispersion decreases so that signal deterioration during transmission can be reduced. A load of an antenna at a remote base station can be reduced allowing many base stations or mobile devices in a pico-cell communication system to be simple and compact, thereby lowering costs of the system. Placement of controls and maintenance systems for a mobile communication system in one central station-allows channel allocation control, hand-over control and antenna position and maintenance to be easily carried out.

Preferred embodiments of the present invention have been disclosed herein and, although specific terms are employed, they are used and are to be interpreted in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purpose of limitation. Accordingly, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that various changes in form and details may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as set forth in the following claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7805073 *28 Apr 200628 Sep 2010Adc Telecommunications, Inc.Systems and methods of optical path protection for distributed antenna systems
US8488970 *27 Dec 201016 Jul 2013Huawei Tecnologies Co., Ltd.Microwave transmission apparatus, signal processing method and device in microwave transmission apparatus
US20110091215 *27 Dec 201021 Apr 2011Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.Microwave transmission apparatus, signal processing method and device in microwave transmission apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification398/41, 398/74, 398/118
International ClassificationH04J14/02, H04B10/12, H04J14/00, H04B10/24
Cooperative ClassificationH04B10/25752
European ClassificationH04B10/25752