Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20070267100 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/382,114
Publication date22 Nov 2007
Filing date8 May 2006
Priority date8 May 2006
Publication number11382114, 382114, US 2007/0267100 A1, US 2007/267100 A1, US 20070267100 A1, US 20070267100A1, US 2007267100 A1, US 2007267100A1, US-A1-20070267100, US-A1-2007267100, US2007/0267100A1, US2007/267100A1, US20070267100 A1, US20070267100A1, US2007267100 A1, US2007267100A1
InventorsGregory Spear, Chun-Yen Wang, Hung Chen
Original AssigneeSpear Gregory N, Chun-Yen Wang, Chen Hung H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle Cap and Method of Use With a Liquid Dispensing Apparatus and System
US 20070267100 A1
Abstract
A cap is provided for sealing a liquid container such as a water bottle. The cap may include a cap body with an outer annular wall engaging the bottle neck, and an inner annular wall with a plug gripping formation engaging a cap gripping formation on a cap plug. The cap body and the cap plug may be attached by a tether to ensure that the cap plug does not completely disassociate from the cap during liquid container removal and replacement. A method for using such a cap, including various embodiments of the cap body and cap plug, is also disclosed and claimed.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(17)
1. A cap for sealing a liquid container, comprising:
a cap body comprising an outer annular wall sized to sealingly contact a neck of the liquid container, and an inner annular wall with at least one plug gripping formation; and
a cap plug having an outer surface with at least one cap gripping formation for engaging a corresponding of the at least one plug gripping formation;
wherein the cap body and the cap plug are physically attached by a tether to ensure that the cap plug does not completely disassociate from the cap during liquid container removal and replacement.
2. The cap of claim 1, wherein the tether is connected to a plastic ring sized to fit over the inner annular wall of the cap body.
3. A liquid container closure and probe combination for use in dispensing a liquid from a container, comprising:
a probe in fluid communication with the liquid container and adapted to allow the removal of liquid from the container; and
a closure comprising a cap body and a cap plug, the cap body comprising an annular wall sized to sealingly contact a neck of the liquid container, an inner surface of the annular wall comprising at least one plug gripping formation; and
the cap plug having an outer surface with at least one cap gripping formation for engaging a corresponding of the at least one plug gripping formation;
wherein the cap body and the cap plug are physically attached by a tether.
4. The liquid container closure and probe combination of claim 3, wherein the plug comprises an annular sealing portion abutting a corresponding portion of the inner annular wall of the cap body to provide a liquid-tight seal between the plug and the cap body, and wherein the plug further comprises an engaging portion which engages and retains the plug in a fixed position adjacent the probe when the probe is engaged to remove liquid from the container.
5. A method for enabling dispensing from a liquid container, comprising the steps of:
providing a cap body comprising an annular wall sized to connect to a portion of the liquid container, and a frangible cap plug having a seal that may be ruptured;
inserting a hollow probe into the cap plug, rupturing the cap plug and thereby enabling fluid communication between the liquid container and the probe; and
disengaging the probe from the cap plug, wherein the cap plug automatically substantially reseals.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein the cap plug comprises a resilient check valve.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the check valve comprises an elastomeric material.
8. The method of claim 5, wherein when the probe is disengaged from the cap plug, the cap plug returns to its approximate original shape prior to insertion of the probe and seal rupture.
9. The method of claim 5, wherein the cap plug contains a thinned portion which ruptures upon insertion of the probe into the cap plug.
10. A method for enabling dispensing from a liquid container, comprising the steps of:
providing a cap body comprising concentric outer and inner annular walls, the outer annular wall adapted to engage a portion of the liquid container in fluid communication between the liquid container and the cap body, and the inner annular wall adapted to seat a generally wedge-shaped cap plug;
inserting a hollow probe is inserted into the cap body to thereby engage the cap plug, raising the cap plug above the inner annular wall of the cap body and enabling fluid communication between the liquid container and the probe;
disengaging the cap body from the probe, whereby the cap plug is caused to reseat itself within the inner annular wall of the cap body, the cap plug thereby substantially resealing the liquid container.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein the cap plug does not contact any outside or top surface of the inner annular wall of the cap body.
12. The method of claim 10, wherein the inner annular wall of the cap body bows outwardly when the probe is disengaged from the cap and the cap plug reseats itself between within the inner annular wall of the cap body.
13. The method of claim 10, wherein when the liquid container is removed from the probe, the frictional force between the inner annular wall of the cap body and outer wall of the cap plug exceeds a snap engagement force between the cap plug and the post, thereby allowing the post to disengage from the cap plug while permitting the cap plug to reseal the liquid container by reseating itself within the inner annular wall of the cap body.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein each of the inner annular wall and the outer wall of the cap plug include one or more annular ribs designed to engaged each other in a liquid-tight manner.
15. A method for dispensing liquid from a bottle having a bottle cap normally sealing the bottle and in selective fluid communication with a water dispensing unit housing a reservoir and an upstanding hollow probe, comprising the steps of:
placing the bottle adjacent the water dispensing unit, and seating the probe in contact with and in fluid communication with the bottle cap, wherein a cap plug is attached to the bottle cap by an attachment mechanism;
dispensing the liquid from the bottle, so that the liquid flows through the bottle neck, the bottle cap and the attached cap plug and through the probe; and
removing the bottle from the probe while retaining the bottle cap sealed to the bottle, with the cap plug remaining attached to the bottle cap by the attachment mechanism.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the attachment mechanism comprises a tether.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein the tether is connected to a ring attached to a portion of the bottle cap.
Description
    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention generally relates to the dispensing of liquid from bottles and, more particularly, to a no-spill dispensing apparatus and system that overcomes the cap “floater” problem in the industry, while retaining the advantages o current liquid dispensing systems.
  • [0002]
    Bottled water companies supply packaged purified water to end users, typically in five-gallon bottles. The five-gallon bottle is heavy and difficult to install without spilling water. Also, since the water in the bottle is purified, there is a desire by the industry to maintain the integrity of both the water and the water bottle. Therefore, caps have been developed to make the bottle easier to install and to also maintain the quality of the water and the container during transportation and installation onto a water dispensing appliance such as a water cooler. Examples of such caps are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,392,939, 5,542,555 and 5,904,259, each of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. In these cap designs, the cap fits over the neck of the bottle and seals the bottle so that it is watertight and sealed against contamination. When the consumer of the water installs the water bottle on the water dispensing appliance, an internal cap plug is dislodged and seats itself on an upstanding probe. An opening in the probe allows water to flow into the water dispensing appliance without spilling and without the need to remove the can and expose the contents of the bottle to contamination. During water dispensing, the cap plug is intended to remain fixed to the probe until the bottle is empty and is removed from the water dispensing appliance. Then, upon bottle removal from the water cooler, it is intended that the cap plug reseat itself inside the cap and reseal the bottle. This allows the bottle to be removed without spilling any remaining contents in the bottle, while also resealing the bottle and reducing the opportunity for contamination of the bottle during transportation of the empty bottle back to the filling location. However, because of inconsistencies in the manufacturing process of both the probe mechanism and the caps, and because the cap must operate on many different type of probe mechanisms used in the industry, the cap plug frequently does not seat correctly on the probe. This may result in the plug, instead of reseating itself inside the cap, separating from the cap and floating inside the water bottle. This is termed a “floater” in the industry and is objectionable both from the industry's perspective and from the consumer's point of view. Additionally, when the bottle is substantially empty and ready to be removed, a floating plug will not reseat itself on the probe. The result is that water can spill from the bottle as the bottle is removed, the bottle will not be sealed, and the loose plug can foul washing and filling equipment when the bottle is returned for refilling.
  • [0003]
    Accordingly, it would be advantageous to provide a bottle cap which overcomes these problems.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    The present invention includes a bottle cap and method for its use in connection with a water dispensing apparatus and system in which the cap plug is physically attached to the cap body so that if the cap plug does not seat properly on the probe mechanism, it will not float away into the bottle. This eliminates the visual “floater” problem and also ensures that the cap plug, since physically attached to the cap, will be discarded when the cap is discarded. It is believed that the present invention will, therefore, substantially reduce customer complaints and concerns over cap plug “floaters,” reduce associated equipment problems, and also reduce, although not eliminate, the possibility of the plug releasing from the probe mechanism.
  • [0005]
    In a preferred embodiment of the invention, a cap is provided for sealing a liquid container such as a water bottle. The cap includes a body with an annular wall sized to sealingly contact a neck of the liquid container, and an inner annular wall with at least one plug gripping formation. The cap also includes a cap plug having an outer surface with at least one cap gripping formation for engaging a corresponding of the at least one plug gripping formation. The cap body and the cap plug are physically attached by a tether to ensure that the cap plug does not completely disassociate from the cap during liquid container removal and replacement. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the tether, which may be a plastic strip, may be connected to a plastic ring sized to snap-fit over the inner annular wall of the cap body.
  • [0006]
    In an alternative embodiment of the invention, a liquid container closure and probe combination for use in dispensing a liquid from the container is provided. The probe is adapted to be placed in fluid communication with the liquid container, and to allow the removal of liquid from the container. The closure includes a cap body and a cap plug. The cap body includes an outer annular wall sized to sealingly contact a portion of the liquid container, and an inner annular wall with at least one plug gripping formation. The cap plug includes an outer surface with at least one can gripping formation for engaging the at least one plug gripping formation, to form a liquid-tight seal between the plug and the cap body. Again, the cap body and the cap plug are preferably physically attached by a tether to ensure that the cap plug does not completely disassociate from the cap during liquid container removal and replacement. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the plug includes a sealing portion fitting over and sealing against a corresponding portion of the cap body, and an engaging portion which engages and retains the plug in fixed position adjacent the probe when the probe is engaged to remove liquid from the container.
  • [0007]
    In another alternative embodiment of the present invention, a method is provided enabling dispensing from a liquid container. A cap body is provided having an annular wall sized for connection to a portion of the liquid container, and a frangible cap plug having a seal that may be ruptured. When a hollow probe is inserted into the cap, the cap plug is ruptured, enabling fluid communication between the probe and the liquid container, and when the probe is disengaged from the cap, the cap plug automatically substantially reseals the liquid container. The cap plug preferably is made of a resilient membrane or check valve, and most preferably is made of a thermoset or thermoplastic elastomers (e.g., silicone) that returns to its original shape when the load is removed. Such a cap plug is available, for example, from Liquid Molding Systems, Inc. of Midland, Mich. When the probe is disengaged from the cap, the cap plug, depending upon its design and material, may be caused to return to its approximate original shape. The cap plug may initially include a thinned portion which ruptures upon insertion of the probe.
  • [0008]
    In another alternative embodiment of the invention, a method is provided for enabling dispensing from a liquid container. A cap is provided for sealing a liquid container which includes a cap body with concentric outer and inner annular walls. The outer annular wall may be sized to connect to a portion of the liquid container. The inner annular wall may be sized to accept wedge-shaped cap plug. When a probe is inserted into the cap, the cap plug is engaged by the probe and the cap plug is raised by the probe above the inner annular wall, enabling fluid communication between the liquid container and the probe. Upon disengagement of the cap from the probe, the cap plug substantially reseals the liquid container by reseating itself within the inner annular wall of the cap body. Preferably, the cap plug does not contact any outside or top surface of the inner annular wall of the cap body. The inner annular wall of the cap body may be caused to bow outwardly when the cap is disengaged from the probe and the cap plug is seated back within the inner annular wall; during this reseating, the design of the cap plug, probe and inner annular wall of the cap body is such that the frictional force between the inner annular wall of the cap body and outer walls of the cap plug exceeds a snap force between the cap plug and the post, thereby allowing the post to disengage from the cap while permitting the cap plug to reseat itself between the inner walls of the cap body.
  • [0009]
    In yet another alternative embodiment of the present invention, a method is provided for dispensing liquid from a bottle having a bottle cap normally sealing the bottle and in selective fluid communication with a water dispensing unit housing a reservoir and an upstanding hollow probe. The bottle is placed adjacent the water dispensing unit, and the probe is seated in contact with and in fluid communication with the bottle cap. A cap plug is attached to the bottle cap using an attachment mechanism such as a tether terminating in a ring sized to fit an annular wall on the bottle cap. Dispensing liquid from the bottle commences, causing the liquid to flow through the bottle neck, the bottle cap and the attached cap plug, and through the probe. When the bottle is removed from the probe, the bottle cap remains engaged with the bottle, and the cap plug remains attached to the bottle cap by the attachment mechanism.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0010]
    The novel features which are characteristic of the invention are set forth in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, together with further objects and attendant advantage thereof, can be better understood by reference to following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 is a partial sectional view of one preferred embodiment of the bottle cap of the present invention installed on a bottle container neck, and about to be inserted onto the skirt of a dispensing unit having an upstanding feedstock or probe;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 is an exploded, sectional view of the bottle cap embodiment shown in FIG. 1, with the bottle now lowered such that the probe has been inserted into the bottle cap; allowing dispensing into a lower reservoir (not shown) to occur;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 3 is a side and planar perspective of a preferred bottle cap of the present invention, showing a cap plug tethered to the cap body;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 4 is a sectional view along section line 4-4 of FIG. 3;
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 5A and 5B are enlarged sectional views showing the cap plug/bottle cap wall interaction (before and after abutment, respectively) as indicated by the referenced bracket in FIG. 4;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 6 is a side and planar perspective view of an alternative bottle cap embodiment according to another aspect of the present invention;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 7 shows the bottle cap embodiment of FIG. 6, with a probe having pierced the middle gasket of the cap;
  • [0018]
    FIGS. 8A-8C are sectional views of the bottle cap embodiment shown in FIGS. 6-7 showing the bottle cap before, during and after probe penetration, respectively, while FIGS. 8AA and 8CC are enlarged sectional views of the circled portion shown in FIG. 8A before and after seal rupture, respectively;
  • [0019]
    FIGS. 9A-9C are sectional views of yet another alternative bottle cap design according to another aspect of the present invention, showing the bottle cap before, during and after probe penetration, respectively; and
  • [0020]
    FIG. 9D is an enlarged view of the circled portion in FIG. 9C.
  • [0021]
    The components in the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the present invention. In the drawings, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.
  • DEFINITION OF CLAIM TERMS
  • [0022]
    The following terms are used in the claims of the patent as filed and are intended to have their broadest meaning consistent with the requirements of law. Where alternative meanings are possible, the broadest meaning is intended. All words used in the claims are intended to be used in the normal, customary usage of grammar and the English language.
  • [0023]
    “Snap force” means the frictional force exerted between interior surfaces of the cap plug and an exterior surface of a top portion of the fill post, causing the cap plug to remain attached to the fill post.
  • [0024]
    “Substantially reseals” means that the cap plug seal reseals in a substantially liquid-tight fashion that may allow drips of liquid to pass the seal, but does not allow a steady trickle or stream of liquid to pass the seal.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0025]
    Set forth below is a description of what are believed to be the preferred embodiments and/or best examples of the invention claimed. Future and present alternatives and modifications to this preferred embodiment are contemplated. Any alternatives or modifications which make insubstantial changes in function, in purpose, in structure, or in result are intended to be covered by the claims of this patent.
  • [0026]
    Referring first to FIG. 1, a preferred embodiment of the bottle cap of the present invention, generally referenced by numeral 10, is shown. Bottle cap 10 may be sealed over open neck portion 15 of a liquid source, such as a 5-gallon water bottle. A conventional liquid dispensing apparatus 20, which may include an upstanding feedstock or probe 22 and a skirt 24 for supporting the water bottle, is shown. Base 14 may be connected to a lower liquid reservoir (not shown). Circulate plate 30 including annual wall 30A may be connected in liquid-tight fashion to the lower reservoir using rubber gasket 31, for example. As disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,957,316, for example, and as known in the art, once hollow probe 22 has been inserted into bottle cap 10, liquid such as water may be allowed to flow from the liquid source through the probe and into the reservoir in fluid communication with the probe, so that liquid may be dispensed from the bottle and into the reservoir. To ensure continuous dispensing and to avoid airlock, air may be permitted to flow through probe ports 22A from an ambient source, for example, so that air enters the liquid source/water bottle during dispensing.
  • [0027]
    Referring now to FIGS. 2-4, bottle cap 10 includes inner annular wall 27 and outer annular wall 29. A cap plug 25, having an attached tether 26 and ring 28, is also provided. To overcome the “floater” problem, ring 28 may be placed over the outer surface 27A of inner wall 27. Cap plug 25 may then be inserted within inner wall 27 of bottle cap 10. Referring to FIGS. 3 and 5A-5B, rib 33 on the outer surface of cap plug 25 is designed to provide a liquid-tight seal with lip 27C of inner wall 27. Rib 33 also may act as a secondary stop mechanism, to ensure that the plug is not dislodged from the bottle cap. Edge 39 and ledge 37 on the cap plug (see FIGS. 5A and 5B) may act as the primary stop mechanism, abutting bottle cap flange 27B to ensure that the cap plug is not pushed too deeply within wall 27 during initial water bottle installation and mating with the probe.
  • [0028]
    In operation, when probe 22 has been inserted through inner wall 27, inner wall lip 27C of the bottle cap (FIG. 3) may be configured to snap fit with probe ledge 22B (FIG. 1), ensuring a tight fit between the bottle cap and the probe. In this position, cap plug 25 may cover the top portion of probe 22. During dispensing, liquid is permitted to flow from the liquid source down through the bottle neck and bottle cap 10, down through cap plug 25 (a pinhole, not shown, may be provided in the closed top 25A, shown in FIG. 4, for this purpose), through probe ports 22A, down through the hollow probe and into the lower reservoir below the probe (not shown). When the liquid source (e.g., water bottle) is empty, and is removed from the probe, bottle cap 10 with cap plug 25 intact may be removed as an integral piece from the probe.
  • [0029]
    Referring to FIG. 4, bottle cap 10 may be provided with tear tab 40 having ribs 40A to facilitate grasping of the tear tab A seam of weakened area 41 may be provided to facilitate tearing. Of course, with the present invention, as there is no need for the consumer to remove the bottle cap during or after dispensing, bottle caps without tear tabs or weakened seams may be employed. It may be desirable, however, to utilize bottle caps with tear tabs and weakened seams for those bottlers not possessing decapping machines, for example. Finger 36 may be provided on the inner surface of outer annular cap wall 29 to hold down a compressible insert 57.
  • [0030]
    Referring now to FIGS. 6-8, an alternative bottle cap 50 is shown. Bottle cap 50 may be constructed in a similar fashion to bottle cap, 10 described above; however, cap plug 25 may be replaced with check valve 51, which may be made of a pliable or elastomeric material such as silicone. Silicone valve 51 may have a weakened area 51A at a midpoint so that, prior to insertion by hollow post or probe 22, the check valve is still fully sealed. Referring to FIG. 7, upon post penetration, check valve 51 is ruptured at portion 51A, allowing separate upward movement of flaps 51B and permitting dispensing to occur. When the water bottle is empty and probe 22 is removed from cap 50, check valve 51 returns to its original shape, as shown in FIG. 8C, preferably resealing the bottle in a liquid-tight or substantially liquid-tight fashion.
  • [0031]
    Referring now to FIGS. 9A-9D, yet another alternative bottle cap 60 is shown. Bottle cap 60 may be constructed in a similar fashion to bottle cap 10, described, above; however, cap plug 25 may be replaced with a wedge-shaped plug 61, as shown. Referring to FIG. 9A, plug 61 is initially retained within bottle cap 60 as shown. Referring to FIG. 9B, upon penetration of the cap by probe 22, edges 61B (see FIG. 9D) of plug 61 are retained within the annular inset between probe ledge 22B and the probe cap; plug 61 is raised by upward movement of the probe and removed from the cap's inner side walls 27, allowing water to flow through the liquid source, through probe opening 22A, and from the post into a reservoir (not shown), in the direction of the arrows. Ambient air may also be permitted to enter the probe and then, through the probe, to enter the liquid source to prevent air lock. Referring to FIG. 9C, when the bottle cap is removed from the post, wedge-shaped plug 61 is caused to slide down and once again seat itself within inner cap side walls 27. Referring to FIGS. 9C and 9D, this occurs as cap side walls 27 may be designed to distort or bow slightly outwardly as wedge-shaped plug 61 enters, such that the friction between the outer surface of plug walls 61A and the inner surface of inner cap wall 27C and annular nubs 27B will gradually increase; when the friction between these opposing surfaces exceeds the snap force between plug 61 and post 22, the post will be released and the plug will reseat itself within cap walls 27 and reseal cap 60, as shown in FIG. 9C. In the event that the plug were not to thus disengage from the probe, the tether (not shown in these drawings for simplicity) could be used to ensure that the plug is removed from the probe when the bottle cap/bottle combination is removed.
  • [0032]
    Still referring to FIGS. 9A-9D, inner wall annular ribs 27D function as the stopper for plug 61 to limit its downward movement. Plug nub 27B interacts with wall protuberance 61C to provide a liquid-tight seal between cap wall 27 and probe 22. As shown, during its life cycle plug 61 does not touch either top portion 27A or the outer periphery 27D of cap wall 27.
  • [0033]
    The above description is not intended to limit the meaning of the words used in the following claims that define the invention. Other systems, methods, features, and advantages of the present invention will be, or will become apparent to one having ordinary skill in the art upon examination of the foregoing drawings, written description and claims, and persons of ordinary skill in the art will understand that a variety of other designs still falling within the scope of the following claims may be envisioned and used. It is contemplated that these or other future modifications in structure, function or result will exist that are not substantial changes and that all such insubstantial changes in what is claimed are intended to be covered by the claims.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1241352 *23 Feb 191525 Sep 1917Charles Doering JrWater-dispensing device.
US1248705 *26 Oct 19154 Dec 1917George D PogueContainer for drinking-water.
US1319376 *21 Oct 1919 Planooraph co
US1337206 *5 Apr 191520 Apr 1920Doering Jr CharlesLiquid cooling and dispensing apparatus
US1933192 *18 Jul 193231 Oct 1933Taylor NelsonLiquid dispenser
US1948644 *9 Jan 193127 Feb 1934Norge CorpWater cooler
US1960604 *24 May 193229 May 1934Fleet Mont V VanSanitary dispensing olla
US1976007 *2 Sep 19329 Oct 1934Alfred F PillsburyWater cooler
US2057238 *5 Nov 193413 Oct 1936Philip P KrugLiquid-dispensing apparatus
US2072629 *4 Oct 19342 Mar 1937Ernst FernholzCoupling device for carbonators
US2689669 *23 Jan 195021 Sep 1954Medalie Mfg CompanyLiquid dispenser
US2811272 *3 Dec 195129 Oct 1957William LawlorSanitary shields for spring water drinking dispensers
US3033247 *11 Sep 19618 May 1962Linden H ChandlerVented non-drip liquid dispensing device
US3193143 *18 Oct 19626 Jul 1965Vincent MaieliAutomatic liquid dispensing device
US3207190 *3 Jan 196421 Sep 1965Huffman Mfg CompanyBattery filler
US3341073 *14 Apr 196512 Sep 1967Milton J ArpsMetering and dispensing apparatus
US3540402 *29 Oct 196817 Nov 1970Parker Hannifin CorpLiquid dispensing device
US3606096 *30 Sep 196920 Sep 1971Huffman Mfg CoLiquid dispensing device
US3768501 *10 May 197130 Oct 1973Automatic Helium Balloon SystInflatable article valve
US3774658 *3 Mar 197227 Nov 1973Arthur Products CoVent tube with slidable spreader for filling containers
US3802606 *5 May 19729 Apr 1974Courtsey Prod CorpStopper type liquid dispensing apparatus
US3843021 *2 Oct 197222 Oct 1974Corco IncDisposable reservoir package for liquid-dispenser having float-operated valve
US3892235 *31 Jul 19731 Jul 1975Respiratory CareMulti-use inhalation therapy apparatus
US3893599 *17 Oct 19738 Jul 1975Cornelius CoMeans for dispensing
US3920149 *23 Nov 197318 Nov 1975Robert B DoddsBeverage dispensing apparatus and method
US3966093 *27 Feb 197529 Jun 1976Frahm Carl EValved water container with seal
US3973602 *18 Jun 197410 Aug 1976Kruse Frederick WFunnel with signal
US3974863 *27 Feb 197517 Aug 1976Frahm Carl EValved water container with seal
US3993218 *7 Mar 197523 Nov 1976Reichenberger Arthur MLiquor dispenser
US4124146 *29 Jan 19767 Nov 1978Sealfon Andrew IFluid metering device
US4137930 *26 Jan 19776 Feb 1979Scholle CorporationSingle operation normally closed coupling valve
US4239130 *18 Apr 197916 Dec 1980Altadonna Lawrence JOil caddy
US4244467 *4 Jun 197913 Jan 1981Sigma-Tau Industrie Farmaceutiche Riunite S.P.A.Device for the extemporaneous preparation of a solution under sterile conditions
US4267945 *6 Aug 197919 May 1981Maynard Jr Walter PLiquid funnel and container piercing blade combination
US4356848 *30 May 19802 Nov 1982Spies Henry JDispenser assembly
US4421146 *8 Mar 198220 Dec 1983Liqui-Box CorporationQuick-disconnect service-line connector and valve assembly
US4444340 *27 May 198224 Apr 1984Liqui-Box CorporationSelf-sealing dispensing valve and spout assembly
US4445551 *9 Nov 19811 May 1984Bond Curtis JQuick-disconnect coupling and valve assembly
US4583652 *1 Oct 198422 Apr 1986Goldberg James RSafety closure device
US4597423 *26 Mar 19851 Jul 1986Chenot Gary DDevice for opening bottled water containers
US4699188 *17 Jan 198613 Oct 1987Baker Henry EHygienic liquid dispensing system
US4711380 *18 Aug 19868 Dec 1987Liqui-Box CorporationTamper-evident seal for a toggle-type dispensing valve
US4717051 *2 Sep 19865 Jan 1988Guy LeclercCheck valve for water dispenser bottle
US4722463 *12 Sep 19862 Feb 1988Anderson Jerry LFluid dispensing apparatus
US4793514 *14 May 198727 Dec 1988Sheets Kerney TCap for inverted water bottle
US4811865 *24 Sep 198714 Mar 1989Western Industries Inc.Cap and spout assembly for a can
US4834267 *2 Nov 198730 May 1989Elkay Manufacturing CompanyBottled water cooler air filter
US4846236 *6 Jul 198711 Jul 1989Deruntz William RBottled water dispenser insert
US4874023 *30 Sep 198817 Oct 1989Liqui-Box CorporationDecap dispensing system for water cooler bottles
US4898308 *17 Aug 19886 Feb 1990The Coca-Cola CompanyRemovable syrup package
US4902320 *13 Feb 198920 Feb 1990Elkay Manufacturing CompanyBottled water cooler air filter
US4972976 *23 May 198927 Nov 1990Romero Robert ADispensing unit for bottled water
US4991635 *9 Aug 198912 Feb 1991Liqui-Box CorporationDecap dispensing system for water cooler bottles
US4991745 *9 Jan 199012 Feb 1991Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve with trampoline-like construction
US5031676 *11 Jun 199016 Jul 1991Liqui-Box CorporationDecap dispensing system for water cooler bottles
US5033655 *25 Apr 198923 Jul 1991Liquid Molding Systems Inc.Dispensing package for fluid products and the like
US5115950 *14 Jan 199126 May 1992Seaquist Closures A Divison Of Pittway CorporationDispensing closure with unitary structure for retaining a pressure-actuated flexible valve
US5121778 *12 Apr 199116 Jun 1992Elkay Manufacturing CompanyLiquid container support and hygienic liquid dispensing system
US5133482 *28 Nov 199028 Jul 1992Ebtech, Inc.Syrup dispenser valve assembly
US5213236 *6 Dec 199125 May 1993Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve for packaging
US5213309 *18 Mar 199225 May 1993Nitto Kohki Co., Ltd.Coupler for connecting a specimen sampling bottle to a supplying pipe of a plant
US5222530 *12 Apr 199129 Jun 1993Elkay Manufacturing CompanyHygienic cap and liquid dispensing system
US5222531 *15 Jun 199229 Jun 1993Elkay Manufacturing CompanyLiquid container support and hygienic liquid dispensing system
US5246125 *4 May 199221 Sep 1993Sunbeam Plastics CorporationTamper indicating closure with attached tamper indicating band
US5259534 *28 Aug 19929 Nov 1993National PackagingContainer cap with removable insert
US5271531 *27 Apr 199321 Dec 1993Seaquist Closures, A Division Of Pittway Corp.Dispensing closure with pressure-actuated flexible valve
US5273083 *1 Feb 199328 Dec 1993Ebtech, Inc.Bottle cap and valve assembly for a bottled water station
US5289854 *6 May 19931 Mar 1994Elkay Manufacturing CompanyTwo-piece hygienic cap and opening probe or feed tube
US5289855 *6 May 19931 Mar 1994Elkay Manufacturing Co.Liquid container support and probe-type hygienic liquid dispensing system
US5295518 *6 May 199322 Mar 1994Elkay Manufacturing CompanyTwo-piece hygienic cap with resealable plug and tearable skirt with pull tab
US5295519 *6 May 199322 Mar 1994Elkay Manufacturing CompanyHygienic liquid dispensing system including feed tube or probe for opening and resealing coaxial cap
US5337922 *26 Jul 199316 Aug 1994Ebac LimitedApparatus for dispensing liquid from an inverted container
US5339995 *30 Mar 199323 Aug 1994Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve for packaging
US5370270 *16 Jun 19936 Dec 1994Portola Packaging, Inc.Non-spill bottle cap used with water dispensers
US5377877 *23 Apr 19933 Jan 1995Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve for packaging
US5395590 *4 Sep 19927 Mar 1995Swaniger; James R.Valved container lid
US5409144 *10 Sep 199325 Apr 1995Liquid Molding Systems Inc.Dispensing valve for packaging
US5413152 *7 Oct 19919 May 1995Ebtech, Inc.Bottle cap and valve assembly for a bottled water station
US5431205 *8 Oct 199311 Jul 1995Gebhard; Albert W.Dispensing system for bottled liquids
US5439143 *10 May 19948 Aug 1995Liquid Molding Systems, Inc.Dispensing valve for packaging
US5454409 *2 Jun 19943 Oct 1995Waverly Pharmaceutical, Ltd.Transfer adaptors
US5533651 *12 Dec 19949 Jul 1996Eddy; John W.Universal adapter for liquid dispensers
US5653353 *7 Aug 19955 Aug 1997Otto; Robin G.Unitary cap and collar with integral tether construction for bottle feeder
US5676278 *28 Apr 199514 Oct 1997Elkay Manufacturing CompanyWater dispensing feed tube with improved flow
US5687865 *15 May 199518 Nov 1997Portola Packaging, Inc.Spill-reduction cap for fluid container
US5711380 *6 Feb 199727 Jan 1998Chen; YuehRotate percussion hammer/drill shift device
US5957316 *5 Aug 199628 Sep 1999Hidding; Walter E.Valved bottle cap
US6029860 *25 Nov 199629 Feb 2000Elkay Manufacturing CompanyLiquid dispensing device and hygienic adapter
US6059136 *2 Mar 19989 May 2000Lin; PeterEnd cap device for a flanged opening
US6123122 *12 Mar 199926 Sep 2000Abel Unlimited, Inc.Hygenic bottle cap and liquid dispensing system
US6167921 *24 Sep 19992 Jan 2001Oasis CorporationMounting adapter and related bottle cap for a bottled water cooler
US6230940 *2 Nov 199915 May 2001Seaquist Closures Foreign, Inc.One-Piece dispensing system and method for making same
US6279783 *1 Jul 199728 Aug 2001Seaquist Closures Foreign, Inc.Dispensing valve
US6427874 *19 Mar 20016 Aug 2002Seaquist Closures Foreign, Inc.Dispensing valve
US6622882 *28 Mar 200223 Sep 2003James C. SmithClosure device for containers
US6931821 *29 Jul 200323 Aug 2005Evergreen Industries, Inc.Tamper evident vial cap and integrity assurance method
US6951295 *18 Jan 20054 Oct 2005Seaquist Closures Foreign, Inc.Flow control element and dispensing structure incorporating same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US9440840 *2 Dec 201313 Sep 2016Kabushiki Kaisha Cosmo LifeWater dispenser
US20160002020 *2 Dec 20137 Jan 2016Kabushiki Kaisha Cosmo LifeWater dispenser
WO2015081078A1 *25 Nov 20144 Jun 2015Acrux Dds Pty Ltd.A device for dispensing and applying a liquid
WO2015081082A1 *25 Nov 20144 Jun 2015Acrux Dds Pty Ltd.A device for dispensing and spreading a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/351
International ClassificationB65B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2231/022, B65D47/141, B67D3/0032
European ClassificationB67D3/00H2, B65D47/14A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
10 May 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: MTN PRODUCTS, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SPEAR, GREGORY N.;CHEN, HUNG HSIANG;WANG, CHUN-YEN;REEL/FRAME:017607/0664
Effective date: 20060419