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Publication numberUS20050029209 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 10/843,895
Publication date10 Feb 2005
Filing date11 May 2004
Priority date12 May 2003
Publication number10843895, 843895, US 2005/0029209 A1, US 2005/029209 A1, US 20050029209 A1, US 20050029209A1, US 2005029209 A1, US 2005029209A1, US-A1-20050029209, US-A1-2005029209, US2005/0029209A1, US2005/029209A1, US20050029209 A1, US20050029209A1, US2005029209 A1, US2005029209A1
InventorsZackary Engel
Original AssigneeZackary Engel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slide system
US 20050029209 A1
Abstract
The present disclosure provides enhanced slide that facilitates efficient and safe access to items stored on upper shelves. Exemplary system according to the present disclosure includes one or more storage shelves support arms which are vertically mounted on one or more horizontal slides. The arms configurations, which are spring biased or track(s) mechanism guided, allows the arms to travel outward, and then when they are blocked by a stop or aliened with a track, to travel downward. In the case where the arms are pivotally mounted on the slides, the slide system produces horizontal and then arcuate movement of the shelves effectively bringing upper shelves to a lower position. When the arms interacting with guide track(s) mechanism, the slide system produces horizontal and then vertical movement of the shelves effectively bringing upper shelves to a lower position A mini dumper wheel controls the speed of the arms while moving from upper position to a lower position.
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Claims(11)
1. a slide system comprising:
First horizontal support member that can be attached to said a wall, and said horizontal support member having first horizontal track mechanism for telescopic movement between a retracted position and an extended and over traveled position;
Wherein say first horizontal track mechanism include first horizontal running members mounted on said first horizontal support member
Wherein say first horizontal track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first horizontal running members
First vertical support member mounted on the first horizontal support, and said vertical support member having track mechanism for telescopic movement between an upward position and a downward and extended position;
Wherein say first vertical track mechanism include first vertical running members mounted on said first vertical support member
Wherein say first vertical track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first vertical running members
Wherein, first vertical support member mounted on said first horizontal running members.
Wherein said telescoping movement of first horizontal running members permits said first vertical support member to move between extended and over traveled position and a retracted position
Wherein said telescoping movement of first vertical running members permit said first vertical running members to move between upward position to downward and extended position
2. A slide system comprising:
a first horizontal support member and a second horizontal support member positioned in a spaced stack relation, with the first horizontal support member positioned above the second horizontal support member, each of said first and second horizontal support member defining a horizontal axis, an upper face and lower face; and said first and second horizontal support members having track mechanism for movement between a retracted position and an extended and over traveled position
Wherein say first and second horizontal track mechanism include first and second horizontal running members mounted on said first and second horizontal support member respectively
Wherein say first and second horizontal track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first and second horizontal running members
First vertical support member mounted on the first and second horizontal support, and said vertical support member having track mechanism for telescopic movement between an upward position and a downward and extended position;
Wherein say first vertical track mechanism include first vertical running members mounted on said first vertical support member
Wherein say first vertical track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first vertical running members
Wherein, first vertical support member mounted on said first and second horizontal running members.
Wherein said telescoping movement of said first and second horizontal running member permits said first vertical support member to move between extended and over traveled position and a retracted position
Wherein said telescoping movement of first vertical running members permit said first vertical running members to move between upward position to downward and extended position
3. A slide system comprising:
a first horizontal support member and a second horizontal support member positioned in a spaced stack relation, with the first horizontal support member positioned above the second horizontal support member, each of said first and second horizontal support member defining a horizontal axis, an upper face and lower face; and said first and second horizontal support members having track mechanism for movement between a retracted position and an extended and over traveled position
Wherein say first and second horizontal track mechanism include first and second horizontal running members mounted on said first and second horizontal support member respectively
Wherein say first and second horizontal track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first and second horizontal running members
First vertical support member and second vertical support member positioned in a spaced side-by-side relation, each of said first and second vertical support member defining a vertical axis and said first and second vertical support members having track mechanism for movement between a retracted position and an extended position
Wherein say first and second vertical track mechanism include first and second vertical running members mounted on said first and second vertical support member
Wherein say first and second vertical track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said first and second vertical running members
Wherein, first and second vertical support member mounted on said first and second horizontal running members.
Wherein said telescoping movement of said first and second horizontal running member permits said first and second vertical support member to move between extended and over traveled position and a retracted position
Wherein said telescoping movement of first vertical running members permit said first vertical running members to move between upward position to downward and extended position
4. A slide system comprising:
Horizontal support member that can be attached to said a wall, and said horizontal support member having track mechanism for telescopic movement between, retracted position and an extended and over traveled position;
Wherein say horizontal track mechanism include horizontal running members mounted on s d horizontal support member
Wherein say horizontal track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said horizontal running members
A pair of arms support pivotally mounted at first ends to said track mechanism of said horizontal support at spaced apart locations for movement of the second ends of said arms through an arcuate path between an elevated position and deployed position
Wherein, said a pair of arms support mounted on said horizontal running members
Wherein said telescoping movement of said horizontal running member permits said pair of arms support to move between retracted position and an extended and over traveled position
5. A slide system comprising:
Horizontal support member that can be attached to said a wall, and said horizontal support member having track mechanism for telescopic movement between retracted position and an extended and over traveled position;
Wherein say horizontal track mechanism include horizontal running members mounted on said horizontal support member
Wherein say horizontal track mechanism include wheels or ball bearing systems to facilitate movement of said horizontal running members
A pair of arms support pivotally mounted at first ends to said track mechanism of said horizontal support at spaced apart locations for movement of the second ends of said arms through an arcuate path between an elevated position and deployed position
Wherein, said a pair of arms support mounted on said horizontal running members
Wherein said telescoping movement of said horizontal running member permits said pair of arms support to move between retracted position and an extended and over traveled position
6. The apparatus of claim 5 farther including a guide wheel mounted on said arm support and interacts with a guide track for locking said arms support in a desired position to prevent the arms supports from unauthorized arcuate movement until properly vertically aligned
7. The apparatus of claim 6 farther horizontally guiding said arms support from retracted position to extended position.
8. The apparatus of claim 6 farther vertically guiding said arms support from elevated position to downward position when properly aligned
9. The apparatus of claim 6 farther moving said first ends of said arms support from extended position to retracted position when said arms support traveling downward
10. A damper mechanism, comprising:
a first rotating body with centered opening and a first damper body
Wherein said damper body comprise of piston rod with piston rod connector and a pressure tube with a pressure tube connector
Wherein said piston rod, connector attached to said rotating body and a way from said centered opening
Wherein said pressure tube connector attached to a support body and a way from said rotating body
11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein a rotational movement of said rotating body initiate an in and out movement of said piston rod inside said pressure tube.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application claims the benefit of two co-pending and commonly assigned provisional patent applications, as follows: U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60-469,186, filed May 12, 2003 and entitled “Slide Pivot System” and Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60-489,613 ad entitle “Non Linear Damping Method”, filed Jun. 26, 2003. The entire contents of the foregoing provisional patent application are hereby incorporated by reference. This application is also a continuation-in-part application based upon U.S. parent application No. 20030189021, filed Feb. 21, 2003 and entitled Shelving System, and U.S. patent application filed Mar. 31, 2004 and entitled Revolving Slide.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • [0002]
    1. Technical Field
  • [0003]
    This invention generally relates to a slide system that may travels outward and downward. Upper shelves, which are mounted on the arms, can be moved outward and away from lower shelves and downward to an access level position. The lower shelves may be movable upward past the upper storage area, such that the lower storage area and the upper storage area trade places to permit the upper storage areas to be easily accessed.
  • [0004]
    2. Background Art
  • [0005]
    Slides are widely used for displaying and storing items. Sometimes slides are contained within cabinets, armoires, closets, etc., and are constructed to facilitate access to items stored thereon. In designing storage, designers must ensure efficient access to stored items. The height to which a stack of shelves can extend is typically limited by the reach of a person of average size. Alternatively, in some cases upper shelves are positioned out of the reach of users and various tools are provided to permit access to the contents of upper shelves. For example, users may be provided with tools that include footstools, stepladder, reach poles, etc. The use of such tools, however, can be inefficient and, in some cases, can contribute to dangerous conditions. For example, people may be injured from falls off of stepladders and/or footstools. Likewise, the use of reach poles can result in inadvertent knocking and/or dislodging of the desired item or an adjacent item from the shelf. In such circumstances, item(s) may be broken or, worse yet, item(s) may fall from the upper shelf, potentially striking and injuring the person using the reach pole or another person in the vicinity thereof. In addition, such tools are typically a nuisance to have about, can lead to injuries merely by tripping a person, and are frequently misplaced or not readily available for use.
  • [0006]
    In the past, efforts have been directed to providing moveable shelves to address the problems associated with fixedly positioned shelves. Examples of previous efforts directed to developing enhanced shelving systems, which are disclosed in the patent literature include the following U.S. patents.
      • Ochse, U.S. Pat. No. 1,940,877, discloses extension shelving for display cabinets wherein the shelving may be drawn out of the display cabinet by means of tracks and rollers, and the shelves may be tilted to assume a rearward ascending step-wise arrangement, the lower-most shelf extending forward of the cabinet and the upper shelves.
      • Snyder, U.S. Pat. No. 3,640,389 discloses a display stand and expandable shelf for use thereon. The Snyder '389 system includes a base and a pair of upright shelf supports. The components of the system are slidably engageable with each other and conventional fastening means are not required for assembly. Additionally, the shelves include a portion (80) that can be extended vertically upward from the remainder of the shelf (70) to form a step, and other portion(s) (90 and 96) can be extended horizontally outward from the shelf to form a wider shelf (again having a step).
      • Brauning, U.S. Pat. No. 4,056,196 discloses a supporting framework for shelves including crosspieces interconnected with uprights. The cross pieces can ride up and down the uprights and, when positioned in a desired location, can be locked into place by a locking mechanism.
      • Wyckoff, U.S. Pat. No. 4,651,652 discloses a vertically adjustable work desk that is raised by a force applied by a lockable gas spring via a first pulley system. A second pulley system insures that all areas of the work surface are equally raised.
      • Duff et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,919,282 discloses movable gondola shelving for merchandise display having a rolling base that supports channeled uprights and a center panel. Cantilevered shelves are interconnected with the channeled uprights by means of cam assemblies at the rear corners of the shelves. The cam assemblies allow for the shelves to be vertically adjusted while the shelves are maintained in a level position.
      • Sugasawara, et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,011,029 discloses a so-called coat lift hanger for storing coats and/or other garments in a storage area located at a relatively high position of a wardrobe or wall in a room comprising a hanger pipe for removable hanging and storing coats and/or other garments, an arm capable of being pivotally tilted forward and be returned to its uprightly standing position for moving up and down said hanger pipe fitted to its upper end and a rotary lever located at a relatively low position for tilting and returning said arm.
      • Bustos, U.S. Pat. No. 5,014,862, discloses an assembly for a cantilevered display header for a gondola display rack that includes two uprights braced to the gondola display rack in vertical spaced relation. The header, which defines a light box that can receive a sign for illumination thereof, is mounted separately from the shelf and is vertically moveable with respect thereto for adjusting the height of the header with respect to the shelf.
      • Vogelgesang, U.S. Pat. No. 5,482,347 disclosed a pull down shelf assembly for facilitating access to an upper storage shelf. The storage shelf is movably mounted to a shelf guide track mechanism for movement between an extended position and a retracted position. The pull down assembly includes a pair of arms pivotally mounted to the track mechanism and the mounting bracket member at spaced-apart locations. This configuration produces pantographic movement of the track mechanism throughout an arcuate path between a deployed position and an elevated stored position while maintaining the horizontal orientation of the shelf.
      • Duane, U.S. Pat. No. 5,950,846, discloses a storage rack that includes vertically and horizontally moveable supports. The storage rack includes plural spaced horizontal supports for vertical motion. Vertical movement of the rack is powered by one or more hydraulic cylinders carried in the vertical support columns, and an associated control mechanism that allows adjustable vertical positioning of the rack. Horizontal supports of a compound nature are disclosed which permit lateral extension to expose material carried on the support element.
      • Hardy, U.S. Pat. No. 5,970,887, discloses an extendable shelf assembly that includes extender bars having slots and a cooperating pair of rotatable sprockets that are affixed to an axle. The sprockets include a plurality of teeth that engage the slots of the extender bars.
      • Anderson et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,065,821, discloses a vertically adjustable shelf and support rail arrangement for use in a cabinet. The shelf arrangement includes a pair of rotatably mounted rear sprocket members and a driving mechanism for rotating the sprockets to vertically adjust the shelf within the cabinet. The driving mechanism can be manually or electrically powered, and the adjustable shelf may include elements that ensure that the sprockets are not disengaged from the rails while the shelf is within the cabinet.
      • Terragni; Ezio, U.S. Pat. No. 6,105,795, discloses an upwardly/downwardly movable clothes-hanger device which includes, hanging rod for receiving the hung clothes and hanging rod support members which are mounted on a supporting surface. The support members capable of being pivotally tilted forward from a vertical standing position to a horizontal position such as a user can easily access to the hanging rod.
      • Rindoks et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,112,913, discloses a support arrangement for a furniture system that includes a support assembly having a pair of standards which extend vertically in spaced relate. Each of the standards includes two rows of openings extending vertically in spaced relation. A first support member may be detachably mounted in a pair of outermost rows of openings, and a second support may be detachably mounted in a pair of inner most rows of openings.
      • Santiago, U.S. Pat. No. 6,340,240, discloses a cantilever shelf support system wherein the disclosed bracket includes a plurality of forwardly projecting cantilevered male members for insertion into mating female apertures formed in the shelf.
      • Adam, U.S. Pat. No. 6,164,610, discloses a pull down storage shelf assembly wherein arms attached to an upper support member on one end and a lower support member on the other end. When a handle is pulled forward, the upper shelf rotates to the down position to provide easy access to items on the upper shelf. A stop is placed on the side of the upper support members to stop the downward motion and support the shelf at the optimum working level.
  • [0022]
    In addition to the prior art efforts discussed above, the present inventor has previously disclosed advantageous shelving systems. In particular, U.S. Pat. No. 5,799,588 to Engel discloses advantageous shelving systems wherein shelves are provided in a stack arrangement mounted to two or more uprights. The uprights include one or more shelf support members, which support the shelves. One or more of the shelves are movable out from the shelf stack, either by way of a telescoping support member, or otherwise, to permit movement of such shelf or shelves to or past a lower shelf. After an upper shelf or shelves are moved vertically past a lower shelf, the upper shelf or shelves can be moved back into alignment with the lower shelf. In this arrangement, the upper shelf or shelves may be positioned below the lower shelf to permit easy access to the upper shelf or shelves (and their contents). Also, the present inventor has previously disclosed advantageous shelving systems. In particular, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 20030189021 to Engel discloses advantageous shelving systems wherein shelves are provided in a stack arrangement mounted to two or more uprights. Upper shelf or shelves are repeatedly moved vertically past a lower shelf and back into alignment with the lower shelf such as that the shelves moved horizontally and vertically in a revolving manner.
  • [0023]
    While these assemblies may be adequate to permit access to upper storage assembly, most are deficient for one reason or another. The Vogelgesang and the Hansen pivot down assemblies, for instance, disclose a storage system which includes arms support for supporting a plurality of kitchen cabinet shelves so that the shelves may pivot outwardly and downwardly toward the user to an access position. However; to allow the upper storage shelves to pivot downward, a substantial lower storage shelves must be cleared from items. Indeed to minimize the lost of shelving space, these assemblies are limited to kitchen cabinets, which are typically ten inches deep.
  • [0024]
    Other pivot-down assemblies require substantial floor space to allow the shelves support to pivot downward. The Terragni and Sugasawara patents for example, disclose a storage system which includes arm(s) support for supporting a hanging rod so that the cloths hanged on the rod may pivot about outwardly and downwardly toward the user to an access position. However, in addition of lost of storage space below the system, a substantial foot floor space must be also cleared from objects to allow the upper hanging rod to pivot downward.
  • [0025]
    In addition, many of the assemblies require an array of springs biasing systems necessary to raise and lower the shelves. This complex and bulky assembly is very costly and difficult to use and assemble.
  • [0026]
    Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a slide system which permits increased access to the upper storage shelves.
  • [0027]
    It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a slide system which allows upper shelves to travel downward to an access position without the loss of lower storage space and loss of foot floor print space.
  • [0028]
    It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a slide system which allows upper shelves, when in down position, to remain close to the lower shelves.
  • [0029]
    It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a slide system, which allows upper shelves to travel forward horizontally and away from lower shelves, and then pivot downwardly toward the user to an access position.
  • [0030]
    It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a slide system which allows upper shelves to travel forward horizontally and away from lower shelves, and then slide downwardly toward the user to an access position.
  • [0031]
    It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a slide system which allows upper shelf(s) to trade place with lower shelf(s).
  • [0032]
    It is another object of the present invention is to provide a pull down storage shelf assembly which can be easily and safely operated by children, the elderly and handicapped persons.
  • [0033]
    It is another object of the present invention is to provide a pull down storage shelf assembly which includes a mini dumper mechanism that permit reliable and efficient repositioning and dampening of objects and loads.
  • [0034]
    It is an object of the present invention to provide an economical dumper mechanism with a dumping distance longer than its piston stroke length.
  • [0035]
    These and other objectives are satisfied by the revolving slide and the enhanced shelving systems disclosed herein, as will be apparent from the detailed description, which follows.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • [0036]
    The present invention describes two slide systems that allow the movement of storage shelves from an upper position to a lower position.
  • [0037]
    The first slide includes one or more shelves support arms pivotally mounted on a horizontal slide(s). The slide allows the shelves to move outwardly and a way from lower shelves. The arms, however, allow the shelves to pivot downwardly from upper position to a lower position, to permits easy access to the upper shelf or shelves. Further, this slide assembly may include a guide track mechanism to allow upper shelves do travel vertically downward rather than travel downward in an arcuate path, and keep upper shelves close to lower shelves when in down position.
  • [0038]
    The second slide includes one or more telescopic shelves support arms mounted on horizontal slide(s). The slide allows the shelves to move outwardly and a way from lower shelves. The telescopic arms, however, allow the shelves to slide downward and from upper position to a lower position to permits easy access to the upper shelf or shelves.
  • [0039]
    To provide a damper mechanism having a compact size and capable of absorbing an extremely high torque, an advantageous dumping systems that permit a smooth repositioning of the slide or shelves are disclosed in the present invention. The dumping system includes a wheel and a damper. The wheel coacts with moving members associate with the slide system or the shelves systems, e.g. shelves support arms, through cable or rack. A linear or pivotal motion of the moving members is translated to a rotational motion of the wheel. The dumper, which attached to the wheel, controls the speed of the wheel.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0040]
    So that those having ordinary skill in the art to which the disclosed shelving systems appertain will more readily understand how to make and use the same, reference may be had to the appended drawings, wherein:
  • [0041]
    FIG. 1 to FIG. 1.5 describes the first slide system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 1 is a side view of the first slide system, 100, in an upward and retracted position (solid lines) and downward and extended position (broken lines). The slide system includes two arms (103,104) mounted on a slide mechanism 120.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 1.1 shows a front view of the first slide system (100) in upward and retracted position.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 1.2 is a front view of the first shelving system that includes a rack of shelves, generally designated 105, mounted on two slide systems (150, 150′)
  • [0045]
    FIG. 1.3 is a side view of the first shelving system mounted on the upper part of a side wall (112). A rack of lower shelves (105′) mounted on the lower part of the side wall.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 1.4 is a side view of the first shelving system in a pulled out position.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 1.5 is a side view of the first shelving system in a pulled down position.
  • [0048]
    FIG. 2 to FIG. 2.5 describes the second slide system according to the present disclosure. The second slide is similar to the first one but the addition of a guide rail and a guide wheel.
  • [0049]
    FIG. 2 is a side view of the second slide system (200) that includes support rail (201), roller (202), and two vertical arms (203,204) mounted on the roller. A guide wheel 223 attached to arm (203) and interact with a guide rail (220).
  • [0050]
    FIG. 2.1 is a side view of the second shelving system mounted on the upper part of a side wall (212). A rack of lower shelves (205′) mounted on the lower part of the side wall.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 2.2 is a side view of the second shelving system in a full pulled out position.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 2.3 is a side view of the second shelving system in a full pulled out and partially pull down position. While the arms are pivoting downward, guide wheel (223), which is contained by rail (220), pushing roller (202) backward, keeping shelves (205) close to the side wall.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 2.4 is a side view of the second shelving system in a pulled down position
  • [0054]
    FIG. 3 to FIG. 3.2 describes the third slide system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0055]
    FIG. 3 is a side view of the third slide system (300). Vertical ball bearing slide (302), which includes a mounting member (304) and a running member (306), mounted on horizontal ball bearing slide (301), which include mounting member (303) and movable members (305 and 307)
  • [0056]
    FIG. 3.1 is a side view of the third slide system (300) mounted on a side wall (312). A stack of shelves (307, 308, 309, 310) is mounted on slide member 306.
  • [0057]
    FIG. 3.2 is a side view of the third shelving-system in an over travel pulled out position.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 3.3 is a side view of the third shelving system in a full pulled down position.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 4 to FIG. 4.5 describes the forth slide system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0060]
    FIG.4 is a side view of the forth slide system (400) where is a vertical slide (402) mounted on horizontal slide (401). Unlike member 306 associated with the previous exemplary, moving member 404 is limited by a stop 445 to travel inside member 406.
  • [0061]
    FIG. 4.1 is a side view of the forth slide system (400) mounted on a side wall (412). A stack of upper shelves (407, 408) mounted on moving slide member (406), and a stack of upper shelves (409, 410) is mounted on back wall (413).
  • [0062]
    FIG. 4.2 is a side view of the forth shelving system in an over travel pulled out position.
  • [0063]
    FIG. 4.3 is a side view of the forth shelving system in a full pulled down position.
  • [0064]
    FIG. 4.4 is a three dimension view of the forth shelving system in a full pulled out position.
  • [0065]
    FIG. 5 to FIG. 5.5 describes the fifth slide system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0066]
    FIG. 5 is a side view of the fifth slide system (500) where is a vertical slide (502) mounted on horizontal slide (501, 520).
  • [0067]
    FIG. 5.1 is a side view of the fifth slide system (500) mounted on a side wall (512). A stack of upper shelves (507, 508) mounted on moving slide member (506), and a stack of upper shelves (509, 510) is mounted on back wall (513).
  • [0068]
    FIG. 5.2 is a side view of the fifth shelving system in an over travel pulled out and pull down position.
  • [0069]
    FIG. 6 to FIG. 6.2 describes the sixth slide system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0070]
    FIG.6 is a side view of the sixth slide system (600) where is a vertical slides (602, 630) mounted on horizontal slide (601, 620).
  • [0071]
    FIG. 6.1 is a side view of the sixth slide system (600) mounted on a side wall (612). A stack of shelves (607, 608, 609, and 610) mounted on moving slide member (606, 636).
  • [0072]
    FIG. 6.2 is a side view of the sixth shelving system in an over travel pulled out and pull down position.
  • [0073]
    FIG. 6.3 is a three dimensions view of the sixth shelving system mounted on a side wall and in a pull out position.
  • [0074]
    FIG. 7 to FIG. 7.5 describes a dumping system according to the present disclosure.
  • [0075]
    FIG. 7 shows a dumping system (700) that includes a sprocket wheel (701) and a dumper (702) mounted on a support section (705). The dumper (702) attached to the sprocket wheel at one end (706) and to the support at the other end (707).
  • [0076]
    FIG. 7.1-7.3 shows three rotational phases of dumping system 700 where sprocket wheel rotates clockwise 701 and counter clockwise (arrow A), triggering piston rod 704 moved in and out of pressure tube 703.
  • [0077]
    FIG. 7.4 shows a side view of dumping system 700.
  • [0078]
    FIG. 7.5 shows a dumping system 710 which includes two dumpers (712, 712′) and two sprockets wheels (711, 711′) mounted on a support section (715). Both dumpers are mounted on the support at one edge (717, 717′), but each of them is attached at the other edge (716, 716′) to one sprocket wheel. The dumper pistons are attached to the wheel at 90 degrees relative to each other and the sprocket wheel are coact with each other.
  • [0079]
    FIG. 7.6 shows a dumping system (733), which serves as a slide member, mounted on upright support similar to upright support described in FIG. 6.3 reference.
  • [0080]
    FIG. 7.7 shows a dumping system (730), which serve as a pulley wheel, mounted on an upright support similar to upright support described in Engel prior art.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENT(S)
  • [0081]
    The present disclosure provides enhanced slides and storage systems and, more particularly, slides that facilitate efficient storage of, and access to, a variety of items and products. The disclosed slides permit reliable and efficient repositioning of one or more shelves relative to storage space, thereby enhancing utilization and efficiencies associated therewith. The disclosed slides offer a stable, flexible construction that enhances safety for system users and significant economic benefits through cost-effective use of storage space.
  • [0082]
    Importantly, the slides of the present disclosure are susceptible to wide ranging applications. For example, the disclosed slides are advantageously employed in free-standing shelving systems, e.g., shelving systems for use in commercial or domestic applications such as retail product displays, warehouse storage, electronic and telecommunication equipment storage, garage and attic storage, food storage, etc. Moreover, the disclosed slides may be advantageously employed within enclosures, e.g., within armoires, closets, storage bins, freezers, refrigerators, kitchen cabinetry and the like. In addition, the disclosed “shelves” may take a variety of forms without departing from the spirit and/or scope of the present disclosure. For example, the exemplary “shelves” disclosed herein may alternatively take the form of hanging rods, drawers, bins and the like. Additionally, the disclosed slides systems may be manufactured and/or distributed as free-standing, independent units or as components for use in retrofitting existing shelving unit(s) and/or shelving system(s). Thus, as used herein, the terms shelf, shelves, “shelving system” and “shelving systems” are intended to broadly encompass shelving/storage applications wherein storage is achieved through vertically spaced storage elements and wherein efficiencies and/or benefits may be achieved through vertical repositioning of such storage elements.
  • [0083]
    While the present invention will be described with reference to a few specific embodiments, the description is illustrative of the invention and is not to be construed as limiting the invention. Various modifications to the present invention can be made to the preferred embodiments by those skilled in the art without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.
  • [0084]
    Finally, the present invention will be described with reference to embodiments mostly comprise of a stack of shelves mounted on one slide system in a cantilever manner. However, as seen in some drawings thereafter, a pair of slide may be used to support stack of shelves.
  • [0085]
    With reference to the enclosed figures, which depict exemplary embodiments of slide systems according to the present disclosure, reference is initially made to the exemplary Slide System, generally designated 100, that is schematically depicted in FIGS. 1-1.5.
  • [0086]
    Referring to FIGS. 1, a slide system is comprised of two shelf support members (104,103) pivotally mounted by pins (114, 113) to a slide mechanism (120) which comprise of rail (101) and roller (102). This configuration produces a linear and a arcuate movement of the shelf support members between a retracted and upward position (solid lines), and an extended and downward position (dashed lines). The arms (103, 104) and pins location are arranged in such way that the stack of shelves 105 maintains a substantially horizontal orientation throughout this arcuate movement.
  • [0087]
    In reference to FIG. 1.1, FIG. 1.1 provides a front view of the slide system shown in FIG. 1 where the shelf support members are in retracted and upward position.
  • [0088]
    FIG. 1.2 provides a front view of a shelf system comprises of a stack of shelves (105) mounted on pair of slide system (150, 150′). The stack of shelves includes shelf 106 and shelf 107 attached together in a stack arrangement by front legs 110 and 110′ and back legs (not shown) 111 and 111′. The stack of shelves are mounted on the left slide system (150) such as leg 110 mounted on shelf support arm 103 by pin 123 and leg 111 mounted on shelf support arm 104 by pin 124. In the same manner, the stack of shelves mounted on the right slide system (150′) such as leg 110′ mounted on shelf support arm 103′ by pin 123′ and leg 111′ mounted on shelf support arm 104′ by pin 124′.
  • [0089]
    FIG. 1.3 provides a side view of a shelving system mounted on the upper section of a cabinet side wall (112), in a way apparent to persons skilled in the art, with the shelves 105 in the upward position. A stack of shelves, generally designated 105′, are also attached to the lower section of the cabinet back wall (122).
  • [0090]
    In operation, exemplary shelving system 100 operates to facilitate repositioning of upper shelves 106, 107 relative to second shelves 108, 109 by permitting outward horizontal motion of upper shelves 106, 107 past or almost past lower shelves 108, 109 as shown in FIG. 1.4. When pulling shelf 107 outwardly a horizontal motion of upper stack shelves 105 is accomplished by way of the sliding functionality of the running member 102 associated with the slide support member 101. Once stack of shelves 105 is outwardly positioned, keeping pulling downward shelf 107, a downward arcuate movement of shelves 105 is accomplished by way of the pivotal functionality of the shelves arm support 103, 104 as seen in FIG. 1.5.
  • [0091]
    Not shown here, various springs biasing known in the art keep arms in an upright position when the shelves 105 is in elevated position and in horizontal position when shelves 105 is in deployed position. When shelf 107 is pulled toward the user and to an access position, the spring biasing means keep the arms 103 and 104 in an upright position while stack of shelves 105 travels from a retracted position to an extended position. Once stack shelf 105 has been fully extended forward, stop 131 prevent the running member 102 from further moving forward. At this point the springs biasing element will contracted or extended and the stack of shelves 105 will pivot downward toward the user and to an access position.
  • [0092]
    With reference to FIGS. 2-2.4, exemplary Slide System 200 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 100. As seen in FIG. 2, however, two additional components were introduced with exemplary 200. The first component is a guiding wheel 223, which is rotateably attached to shelf support arm 103. The second component is a rail 220, which is comprised of rail 221 and 222 and may mounted on rail 201.
  • [0093]
    Referring to FIGS. 2, a slide system is comprised of two shelf support members (204, 203) pivotally mounted by pins (214, 213) to a roller (202). Roller 202 is positioned within rail 201 and travel therwithin. As shown in FIG. 2, a rail 220 or other cooperative structure is formed by rail 221 and 222 and mounted to the rail 201. Rail 220 cooperates with guide wheel or roller 223, and the wheel is rotatably mounted to shelves arm support 203.
  • [0094]
    Turning to FIG. 2.1 a side view of a shelf system comprises of a stack of shelves (205) mounted on a slide system is provided. The stack of shelves includes shelf 206 and shelf 207 attached together in a stack arrangement by front legs 210 and back legs 211. The stack of shelves are mounted on the slide system such as leg 210 mounted on shelf support arm 203 by pin 223, and leg 211 mounted on shelf support arm 204 by pin 224. As shown in FIG. 2.1, the shelving system mounted on the upper section of a cabinet side wall (212), in a way apparent to persons skilled in the art, with the shelves 205 in the upward position. As seen in FIG. 2.1, a stack of shelves, generally designated 205′ are also attached to the lower section of the cabinet back wall (222).
  • [0095]
    Unlike exemplary 100, where the upper shelves are first travel horizontally outward and then arcuately ally downward, as seen in FIG. 2.1 through FIG. 2.4, the configuration of exemplary 200 produces a horizontally outward and then vertically downward movement of shelves 205 (FIG. 2.1), and an extended and downward position (FIG. 2.4).
  • [0096]
    In operation, exemplary shelving system 200 operates to facilitate repositioning of upper shelves 206, 207 relative to second shelves 208, 209 by permitting outward horizontal motion of upper shelves 206, 207 past lower shelves 208, 209. As shown in FIG. 2.1, a pair of arms 210, 211 maintains a substantially horizontal orientation of stack of shelves 205. In addition, a wheel or roller 223, which is rotatably mounted to shelf support arm 210 and is adapted to ride on a rail 220, maintains the stack of shelves 205 at an upper position. As shown in FIG. 2.2., when pulling shelf 207 outwardly a horizontal motion of upper stack shelves 205 is accomplished by way of the sliding functionality of the running member 202 associated with the rail 201, and by way of guide wheel 223 which runs inside rail 221. After an upper shelf or shelves are moved vertically past a lower shelf, and when guide wheel 223 aligns with vertical rail 222, the upper stack of shelf 205 can be moved vertically downward in alignment with the lower shelf to permit easy access to the upper shelf or shelves. As seen in FIG. 2.3-2.4, a vertical rather than an arcuate movement of shelves 205 is accomplished by way of the engagement of wheel 223 with rail 222. Stated differently, by coacting with rail 222, downward movement of wheel 223 cause shelves arms (210, 211) to travel backward, thereby permitting the stack of shelves 205 to move vertically and close to lower shelves.
  • [0097]
    Referring now to FIGS. 3-3.3, a third exemplary shelving system 300 according to the present disclosure is schematically depicted.
  • [0098]
    As seen in FIG. 3, slide system 300 includes upright support mounted on horizontal support 301. A horizontal support 301 includes “box-like” beams 303, advantageously detachably mounted to surrounding structure(s), e.g., walls, cabinetry, adjacent shelving supports, etc. Beam 303 is sized and dimensioned to accommodate horizontal movement of members 305 by ways of a ball bearings member, and members 305 is sized and dimensioned to accommodate horizontal movement of members 307 by ways of ball bearings member. The horizontal telescopic functionality of support 301 allows upright support 302, which mounted on moving member 307, to travel along beam 301. The telescopic functionality may be achieved by balls, rollers, wheels, and other ways as will be readily apparent to persons skilled in the art. Of note, and as seen in the drawings, it is contemplated according to the present disclosure that a conventional ball bearing drawer slide or any slide available may be used as a horizontal support 311.
  • [0099]
    A vertical shelves support 302 also includes “box-like” beams 304, advantageously detachably mounted to moving member 307 associated with horizontal support 301. Beam 304 is sized and dimensioned to accommodate horizontal movement of members 306 by ways of a ball bearings member. The horizontal telescopic functionality of horizontal support 301 allows shelves, which are mounted on moving member 306, to travel upward and downward along beam 304. The telescopic functionality may be achieved by balls, rollers, wheels, and other ways as will be readily apparent to persons skilled in the art. Of note, and as seen in the drawings, it is contemplated according to the present disclosure that a conventional ball bearing drawer slide or any slide available may be used as a vertical shelves support 302.
  • [0100]
    Thought the drawings depict a “box-like” beams members, alternative cross-sectional configurations are contemplated, e.g., cross-sections that are, in whole or in part, elliptical, trapezoidal, etc., as may be desired to achieve aesthetic effects and/or to accommodate external considerations, e.g., space constraints or manufacturing efficiencies.
  • [0101]
    Turning to FIG. 3.1 a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 312 is provided. The shelf assembly comprises of a stack of shelves (310) mounted on a slide system 300. The stack of shelves, which include shelf 306, 307, 308, and 309, mounted on moving member 306 associated with upright support 302 with the shelves 310 in the upward position. FIG. 3.2 and FIG. 3.3 are also a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 312 is provided. As seen in FIG. 3.2 and 3.3 shelves 310 are in the outward and downward position respectively.
  • [0102]
    In operation, exemplary shelving system 300 operates to facilitate repositioning of shelves 306, 307, 308, and 309 to an access position by permitting outward horizontal motion of the shelves relative to back wall 322, as shown in FIG. 3.2, and vertical movement of the shelves relative to horizontal support 301 as seen in FIG. 3.3. Such horizontal motion of the shelves is accomplished by way of telescoping functionality associated with horizontal support 301. By moving first the shelves outwardly, members 305 and 306 are travel outward within beam 303 such as the shelves over traveled past side wall 312. Once first shelves are outwardly positioned, downward vertical movement of the shelves may be accomplished by way of upright support 302. Stated differently, outward horizontal movement of the shelves creates clearance relative to lower shelves not shown here or objects located below not shown here either, thereby permitting the shelves to move downward to an access position.
  • [0103]
    A leading wheel and a leading rail, for securing the shelves at upper rest position and guiding them when in motion from upper position to lower position, may be incorporated in slide system and shelving system 300 or in other slide system described thereafter, e.g., as disclosed in Zackary Engel prior arts such as U.S. Pat. No. 5,799,588 the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0104]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4-4.4, a forth exemplary shelving system 400 according to the present disclosure is schematically depicted. As seen in FIGS. 4-4.4, exemplary Slide System 400 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 300. As seen in FIG. 4, however, the moving member 406 associated with the upright support 404 is shorter than its corresponding member 306 which associated with exemplary 300. Unlike exemplary 300, and as will hereinafter be described, the configuration of upright support 402 allows member 406 to travel only within beam 404.
  • [0105]
    Turning to FIG. 4.1 a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 412 is provided. The shelf assembly comprises of an upper stack of shelves 415 mounted on a slide system 400, and above a second stack of lower selves 420 mounted on back wall. The upper stack of shelves, which include shelf 407 and 408, mounted on moving member 406 associated with upright support 402, with the upper shelves in the upward position. As will hereinafter be described, lower shelves 420 are shorter than the upper shelves 415 and mounted on the back wall so as to permit the upright support 402 to travel outward and away from lower shelves 420.
  • [0106]
    FIG. 4.2 and FIG. 4.3 are also a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 412 is provided. As seen in FIG. 4.2 and 4.3 shelves 420 are in the outward and downward position respectively.
  • [0107]
    In operation, the upper stack shelves 415 is moved out in the direction of arrow A from a rest position (FIG. 4.2) along horizontal support 401 and in line with the lower shelf 420. By moving the upper shelf 415 out from the stack of shelves, the telescoping support 404 is moved out from member 403, i.e. over-traveled out and past the lower shelf 420. Indeed, the telescoping functionality of element 401 described herein may be achieved through slide elements, e.g., slides that facilitate drawer functionality, that are commercially available in the market. The upper shelf 415 is thus drawn out from the stack of shelves sufficiently to permit the upper shelves 415 to move past or in alignment with the lower shelf 420. After the upper shelf 415 is moved outward from the lower shelves 420, it is then moved downward along the direction of arrow B (FIG. 4.3) to move the upper shelf 415 in alignment with lower shelves 420 and to a position where it can be accessed. As describe there before, upright support 402 facilitates the vertical movement of shelves 415. As of note, upright support 402 may be fabricated, at least in part, utilizing a conventional drawer slide. Alternatively other members and arrangements of rollers may be incorporated to achieve the vertical movement of upper shelves 415, as will be apparent to persons skilled in the art.
  • [0108]
    Not shown here, this and other slide systems disclosed in the present invention may support lower stack of shelves and allows upper shelves to trade place with lower shelves. In this case, this slide includes one or more telescopic arms which support stack of upper shelves. The telescopic arms are vertically mounted on horizontal slide(s) to facilitate an outward and inward movement of the upper shelves. This slide also includes an upright rail to mobilize a stack of lower shelves upwardly and downwardly by way of a roller. Pulley and telescopic bar arrangement connect the stack of upper shelves to the stack of lower shelves such as a vertical movement of the upper shelves causes a corresponding opposite movement of a lower shelf. After an upper shelf or shelves are moved horizontally by way of the slide and vertically to or past a lower shelf by way of the telescopic arms, the upper shelf or shelves may be moved back into alignment with the lower shelf. In this arrangement, the upper shelf or shelves can thereby become positioned below the lower shelf to permits easy access to the upper shelf or shelves.
  • [0109]
    Specifically, when the upper shelf 415 is moved down, the lower shelf 420 may remain in position or may be conversely moved up by means of pulley arrangements, by other means such as the gear and leg arrangement, in a way apparent to persons skilled in the art, or as disclosed in Zackary Engel prior arts such as U.S. Pat. No. 5,799,588 and U.S. patent application 2003-0189021 the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. In such case, and as describe in Engel's prior art, the first shelves 415 is lowered past the second shelves 420, the second shelves 420 are automatically raised past the first shelves 415 to effectively trade positions therewith. Thereafter, the first shelves 415 can be raised up, and the second shelves 429 automatically lowered, such that the first and second sets of shelves are returned to their original relative positions.
  • [0110]
    Turning to FIG. 4.4, a three dimensional embodiment of shelving system 475 is illustrated. In this embodiment, a right slide system 450 similar to those in the previous embodiment (FIG. 4.3) is provided with similar reference numerals plus 50. The right slide 450 is mounted on cabinet side wall 462. As seen in FIG. 4.4, the shelving system 460 also includes a left slide system 451′ similar to the right one with similar reference numerals plus apostrophes. The left slide is mounted on cabinet side wall 462′. Finally as seen in FIG. 4.4, upper shelves 465 is mounted on both slide system 450 and 450′, and lower shelves 470 is mounted on the cabinet back wall 463.
  • [heading-0111]
    In operation shelving system 475 is similar to shelving system 400 as described there above.
  • [0112]
    Referring now to FIGS. 5-5.2, a fifth exemplary shelving system 500 according to the present disclosure is schematically depicted. As seen in FIGS. 5-5.2, exemplary Slide System 500 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 400. In this embodiment, a slide system 500 is similar to those in the previous embodiment 400 is provided with similar reference numerals plus 100. As seen in FIG. 5, however, exemplary 500 includes an additional horizontal support 521. In this embodiment, the upper horizontal support 521 is similar to those of the lower horizontal support 520 with similar reference numerals plus 20. The added horizontal support 521 potentially provides enhanced stability to exemplary storage systems shown in FIG. 4-4.4.
  • [0113]
    As seen in FIG. 5, slide system 500 includes upright support 502 mounted on horizontal supports 501 and 521. As seen in FIG. 5, upright support 502 and horizontal supports 501 and 521 are similar in configuration and operation to uprights and horizontal supports describe in prior slide systems
  • [0114]
    Turning to FIG. 5.1 a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 512 is provided. The shelf assembly comprises of an upper stack of shelves 515 mounted on a slide system 500, and above a second stack of lower selves 520 mounted on back wall 513. The upper stack of shelves, which include shelf 507 and 508, mounted on moving member 506 associated with upright support 502, with the upper shelves in the upward position. As seen in FIG. 5-5.2, upright support 502 is mounted on members 507 and 527 associated with horizontal support 501 and 521 respectively. As will hereinafter be described, lower shelves 520 are shorter than the upper shelves 515 and mounted on the back wall so as to permit the upright support 502 to travel outward and away from lower shelves 520.
  • [0115]
    FIG. 5.2 is also a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 512. As seen in FIG. 5.2 shelves 520 are in the outward and downward position.
  • [0116]
    In operation shelving system 500 is similar to prior shelving system as described there above.
  • [0117]
    Referring now to FIGS. 6-6.3, a sixth exemplary shelving system 600 according to the present disclosure is schematically depicted. As seen in FIGS. 6-6.3, exemplary Slide System 600 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 500. In this embodiment, a slide system 600 is similar to those in the previous embodiment 500 is provided with similar reference numerals plus 100. As seen in FIG. 6, however, exemplary 600 includes an additional upright support 632. In this embodiment, the rear upright support 602 is similar to the front upright support 632 with similar reference numerals plus 30. I addition, as seen in FIG. 6, members 607 and 605 associated with horizontal support 601, and members 627 and 625 associated with horizontal support 621, are relatively longer than those depicted in prior slide systems so as to support the additional front upright support 632. The added upright support potentially provides enhanced stability to exemplary storage systems shown in FIG. 5-5.2.
  • [0118]
    As seen in FIG. 6, slide system 600 includes upright support 602 and upright support 632 mounted on horizontal supports 601 and 621. As seen in FIG. 6, upright support 602 and 632 and horizontal supports 601 and 621 are similar in configuration and operation to uprights and horizontal supports describe in prior slide systems Turning to FIG. 6.1 a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 612 is provided. The shelf assembly comprises of an upper stack of shelves 607 and 608 mounted on a slide system 600, and above a second stack of lower selves 609 and 610 mounted on back wall not shown here. The upper stack of shelves, which include shelf 607 and 608, are mounted on moving member 606 and 636 associated with upright support 602 and 632 respectively, with the upper shelves in the upward position. As seen in FIG. 6-6.2, upright support 602 and 632 are mounted on members 607 and 627 associated with horizontal support 601 and 621 respectively. As will hereinafter be described, lower shelves 609 and 610 are shorter than the upper shelves 607 and 608 and mounted on the back wall so as to permit the upright support 602 and 632 to travel outward and away from lower shelves 609 and 610.
  • [0119]
    FIG. 6.2 is also a side view of a shelf assembly which mounted on side wall 612. As seen in FIG. 6.2 shelves 609 and 610 are in the outward and downward position.
  • [0120]
    Turning to FIG. 6.3, a three dimensional embodiment of slide system 650 mounted on right side wall 662 is illustrated. In this embodiment, a right slide system 650 similar to those in the previous embodiment 600 is provided with similar reference numerals plus 30.
  • [heading-0121]
    In operation shelving system 600 is similar to prior shelving system as described there above.
  • [0122]
    Referring to FIGS. 7-7.4, exemplary 700 shows a compact rotary damper which are mainly including any sprocket wheel and any damper.
  • [0123]
    As seen in FIG. 7.1, a sprocket wheel 701 is mounted on a support object 705 with a suitable connection as known to those skilled in this art. A mini damper 702 is also mounted on support object 705 by the pressure tube connector 707 and on sprocket wheel 701 by the piston rod connector 706, such as the. Importantly, the connection fitting allows the sprocket wheel 701 to rotate, and to the dumper piston rod 703 and pressure tube 704 to pivot.
  • [0124]
    FIG. 7.4 is a side view of exemplary 700 where a sprocket wheel coacts with a damper.
  • [0125]
    In operation, and as seen in FIG. 7.1-7.3, when the sprocket wheel 701 rotates clockwise and counter clockwise (arrow A), the piston rod 704 moved in and out of the pressure tube 703. The movement of the piston 704, which displaces a filling medium through a valve system inside the pressure tube, produces the damping force. The dumping force in return influence the nature of the rotation of the sprocket wheel 701 and thus reduce the speed of the wheel.
  • [0126]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7.5, a second exemplary dumping system 710 according to the present disclosure is schematically depicted. Using one dumper might leave segments of the wheel rotation with little or no damping while the piston will be in a transition period from compression to extension. This can be rectified by the use of two wheels and two dampers with the dampers offset by 90 degrees.
  • [0127]
    As seen in FIG. 7.5, exemplary 710 includes two dumping system which coact together through the sprocket wheels 711 and 711′. Also, as seen in FIG. 7.5, piston rods 714 and 714′ are mounted on sprocket wheel 711 and 711′ at 90 degrees relative to each other (dashed lines 719). As seen in FIGS. 7.5, exemplary dumping system 710 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 700 seen in FIG. 7-7.4. Dumping system 710, which is similar to those in the previous embodiment 700, is provided with similar reference numerals plus 10. Likewise, the additional dumping system, which is similar to the fist one, is provided with similar reference numerals plus apostrophe.
  • [heading-0128]
    In operation damper system 710 is similar to damper system 700 described there above.
  • [0129]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7.6, a first possible application of the damper system is provided. As seen in FIG. 7.6, exemplary dumping system 720 is almost identical in structure and operation to exemplary Slide System 710 seen in FIG. 7.5. Dumping system 720, which is similar to those in the previous embodiment 710, is provided with similar reference numerals plus 10. Member 726 represents an upright support such as upright support 654 seen in FIG. 6.3. In addition, member 725 represents a slide member and shelves support member such shelves support 656 seen in FIG. 6.3.
  • [0130]
    As seen in the FIG. 7.6, two sprocket wheels 721 and 721′ and two dampers 722 and 722′ mounted on the shelves support member 725. Shelves support member 725, which is mounted inside upright support 726, is capable to slide upward and downward by way of wheels 727 and 728 and sprocket wheels 721 and 721′. Gear 725 is mounted on upright support 726 and engages with the sprockets wheel teeth.
  • [0131]
    In operation, and as seen in FIG. 7.6 and prior exemplary, when shelves support slide downward sprocket wheels 721 and 721′, which engage with the rack, rotate. Accordingly, piston rod 724 and 724′ moved in and out of the pressure tube 723 and 723′ respectively. The movement of piston rod 724 and 724′ produces the damping force. The dumping force in return influence the nature of the rotation of the sprocket wheels 721 and 721′ and thus permit reliable and efficient repositioning and dampening of objects which are load on shelves support member 725.
  • [0132]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7.7, a second possible application of the damper system is provided. As seen in FIG. 7.7, exemplary dumping system 730 is similar in structure and operation to prior exemplary an need no farther descriptions.
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Referenced by
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US20060011110 *19 Jul 200419 Jan 2006Reid Walter BVertical & horizontal sliding shelves, henceforth referred to as the HV shelves. Roller and channel guided shelves which have the ability to be manipulated horizontally and vertically, when in a fully extended horizontal position
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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/94.01, 211/99, 211/104
International ClassificationA47F5/08
Cooperative ClassificationA47B46/00