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Publication numberUS1653819 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date27 Dec 1927
Filing date7 Aug 1926
Priority date7 Aug 1926
Publication numberUS 1653819 A, US 1653819A, US-A-1653819, US1653819 A, US1653819A
InventorsEphraim Northcott, Warford James W
Original AssigneeEphraim Northcott, Warford James W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrotherapeutical apparatus
US 1653819 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1927. 1,653,819

E. NORTHCOTT ET AL ELECTROTHERAPEUTICAL APPARATUS Filed Aug. '7. 1926 Illlllllillllw'tllllllllll INVENTORS mam nonmcorz' BY X Z W ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 27, 1927. I

UNITED STATES 1,653,819 P'ATENT OFFICE.

ELECTROTHERAPEU'IICAL APPARATUS.

Application filed August 7, 1926. Serial 80. 127,844.

This invention relates to instruments for electrolytically treating the human bloodcirculatory system. whereby injurious deposits may be removed from the walls of 6 veins, arteries and capillaries of the body.

An object of our invention is to provide instruments for electrolytically treating the blood-circulatory system whereby injurious deposits may be satisfactorily removed from 10 the body.

Another object of our invention is to provide satisfactory apparatus for removing by electrolysis certain injurious substances from the body.

A further object of our invention is to provide apparatus for satisfactorily removing deleterious substances from the veins, ar-

teries, and ca illaries of the human body,

whereby the lood circulatory system may be restored to a healthy condition. y

A further object of the present invention is to provide apparatus for electrically treating the human body, whereby certain unhealthy conditions may be removed therefrom Another object of our invention is to rovide improved apparatus for electrolyticallytreating the blood stream whereby the composition of the blood plasma may be altered.

It is well known in medical science that the membranes covering the capillaries of the human body act as filters of the blood and that through years of such constant filtration a more or less obstructive coating of deleterious substances collects upon the surfaces of the membranes and interferes with the normal passage of the blood therethrough.

The accumulation of the obstructive sub- 40 stances on the surfaces of the membranes renders them more or less impervious to the blood flow, which necessarily results in the starvation of the tissues of the body. The diffusion of the blood through the membrane coverings of the capillaries to the lymph of the bod tissues is caused primarily by the di erence in osmotic pressure; that is, the variation in character and intensity of the solutions 011 either side of the membranes creates a difference of potential which tends to induce a flow through membranes in the direction of a more intense solution. The blood in the arterial capillaries is at somewhat higher. pressure than the lymph of the tissues, and this difference of cardiac pressure must also aid the passage of the blood plasma through the membranes. This function is at high efficlency for only the first few years of life and thereafter there is a tendency for undissolved deleterious substances to accumulate gradually on the inner and outer walls Heretofore there has never been discovered any apparatus for satisfactorily removing such accumulations or deposits from the human blood circulatory system, and although temporary relief has been admin istered b injections being made into the veins an arteries, the resulting effect was in no manner permanent, and the patient soon thereafter foundhimself suffering from the same ailment.

By means of the novel and improved apparatus constituting the present invention, it

is possible to accomplish a result which in effect comprises the removal of certain organic and inorganic accumulations from the walls of the veins, arteries and capillaries of the human body, thereby restorin their originalsoftness, pliability and health condition.

The apparatus constituting the present invention ermits the electrolysis of the blood circu atory system, which is accomplished by causing the blood in two removed parts of the body to contact with an anode and a cathode of a direct electrical current circuit. The passing of the electrical current through the blood circulatory system from the anode to the cathode dissociates the various organic and inorganic solutes of the blood plasma, vthe negative elements of these solutes assembling at the anode and the positive elements collecting on the cathode.

By disturbing the equl lbrium of the composition of the blood direct electroly-.

sis of the blood stream excites the glandular activity of the body and thus increases the solvent action of the blood stream upon' accumulations in the veins, arteries and capillaries.

We have provided apparatus particularly adapted to cause an electrolytic action within the blood circulatory system, and although instruments embodying various modified forms or principles of construction may be satisfactorily used, we have illustrated on the accompanying drawings the preferred form of our improved apparatus for carrying out the method or process herein described.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of the present application for Letters Patent, we have shown two forms our invention may assume, but it will be evident to those skilled in the art that other modifications thereof may be easily constructed, so for this reason it is our desire to have the appended claims determine the limits our invention may assume.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side view of an all metal plunger forming a part of our invention, showing a part thereof in cross-section;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view of a plunger constructed in a different manner and constituting another part of our invention;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of a glass barrelforming a part of a syringe taken on the line 3-3 of Fig.5;

Fig. 4 is a side view of a syringe embodying our invention;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a glass barrel taken on the line 55 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a side view of a hollow needle showing one form of construction; and

Fig. 7 is a View illustrating the manner in which our invention may be applied to a patient to be treated.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral 1 designates the hollow glass barrel of a syringe, having one end tapered to form a tip 2, and the other end entirely open so that a plunger 3 constructed entirely from aluminum or other suitable less electro-positive metal may be inserted therein. To the top of the barrel 1 is attached a hollow needle 4, constructed fr om steel, nickel or other suitable high resistance metal and provided with a pointed end adapted to be inserted into a blood vessel of the human body.

The all metal plunger 3 is secured to a binding post 5 which is connected to the negative terminal of a direct current circuit, supplied with electricity by .suitable batteries 6, or any other suitable means. In practical use the needle 4 is attached to the tip 2 and the metal plunger 3 is inserted inside the hollow barrel 1, thereby forming a cathode syringe adapted to draw a quantity of blood from the body of a patient into the hollow barrel thereof.

anode syringe, which comprises a part of our invention and is used in conjunction with the cathode syringe just de' scribed, is comprised of a hollow glass barrel 1, having one end tapered to form a tip 2 and the other end entirely open so that a plunger 7 may be inserted therein. The plunger 7 is comprised of a bar of suitable shape and size, constructed from glass or other similar material having one end suitably attached to a button 8, made from silver, gold or other highly electro-positive material, and the other end suitably secured to a binding post 5 which is connected to the positive terminal of the direct current circuit furnished withv electricity by the batteries 6. Suitably connected to the button 8 and extending centrally through the glass plunger 7 to the binding post 5, to which it is connected, is a wire 9, composed of a metal similar to that from which the button 8 is constructed. In practical use the needle 4 is attached to the tip 2, and the plunger 7 with the button 8 secured thereto, is inserted inside the hollow barrel 1, thereby forming an anode syringe adapted to draw a quantity of blood from the body of a patient into the hollow barrel thereof.

The plungers 3 and 7 are suitable in size to closely fit inside the hollow glass barrels 1, thereby enabling the blood from a patient to be satisfactorily drawn through the hollow needles 4 into the glass barrels where it contacts with the metal plunger 3 and the button 8 of the plunger 7.

In operation, the needle 4 of one syringe is inserted into a blood vessel of the leg or lower part of the body of a patient and a suitable quantity of blood is drawn into the hollow barrel 1 by drawing the plunger outwardly the desired distance. The needle 4 of the other syringe is inserted into a blood vessel of an arm or other part of the body, and a suitable quantity of blood is drawn into the barrel 1 of the syringe in the manner just described. The anode syringe, comprised of the parts shown in Figs. 2 and 5, may be applied to the lower portion of the body and the cathode syringe, comprised of the parts shown in Figs. 1 and 5, may be applied to the upper part of the body, or vice versa, it being necessary only that the plunger 3 and the metal button 8 of plunger 7 contact with the blood drawn into the hollow glass barrels 1. The terminal of the anode proximately fifteen milliamperes under a ately greater and the blood is then able to dissolve the destructive films of calcium salts on the capillary membranes. Aggregates of various more or less soluble salts attached to the walls of the blood vessels are thereupon undermined by the dissolution of the more soluble components, and the whole structure is swept away by the blood stream. As the electrical current is passing through the blood circulatory system, the

metabolism of the cells is stimulated, thereby promoting more rapid and complete chemical changes in the lymph. For instance,

-microscopic particles of normal calcium sulphate may be speedily rendered non-obstructive by conversion to soluble acid calcium sulphate. Increased activity in this respect raises the proportion of carbon dioxide in the blood and thus the capacity of the blood to dissolve carbonates is increased. The stimulation of the nerve centers by the electrical current passing through the blood system tendsto cause the capillaries to dilate. thus enabling a greater quantity of blood to pass through them and thereby causing a dislodgment of obstruc-- uscles.

The ele trolysis of the blood by means of the present invention frees the circulatory system of deleterious and obstructive substances, and the removal of these salts necessarily softens and clears the blood vessels, thereby enabling the blood to nourish and cleanse the tissues more satisfactorily.

In ordinary cases the electrical current is passed through the blood stream for approximately thirty minutes at a time and as often as needed; but in some instances when the physicalcondition of the patient requires that .the amount, duration and/or pressure of the current be altered to produce the most beneficial results, the operator of the apparatus may accordingly varv the same so that no harmful results may follow the treatment.

Although the manner of applicationof our improved apparatus to the human body hasv been described in detail, it is evident to tive partigles such as salts and dead corthose skilled in the art that the same may be' emplo ed in other ways and may be satis factorily used in the treatment of bodily ailments other than the one herein described. We therefore do not desire to have our inappended claims in which it is defined with more or less particularity as apparatus of an electrotherapeutical nature. The present application relates particularly to the novel apparatus employed in carrying out the process as described and claimed in our co-pending application Electrotherapeutical processes filed August'7, 1926, Serial No. 127,945.

Having described our invention, what we claim is:

l. Electro-therapeutical apparatus comprising, a plurality of syringes having means therein for contacting with the human blood stream, and an electrical current circuit connected to said means, whereby an electrical current may be passed through the said blood stream.

2. A syringe comprising, a hollow barrel having a hollow needle attached to one end thereof, a plunger movably located inside the hollow barrel and provided with a metallic button on one end thereof, means connected to the other end of "the plunger, whereby the plunger may be connected to the terminal of an electric current circuit, and connecting means leading from the metallic button to the first mentioned means.

3. An electro-therapeuti'c apparatus for the in a human circulatory system comprising, distinct and separate anode and cathode elements, independent means cooperating with each of said anode and cathode elements to contact said elements with blood drawn from but still in continuity with said circulatory system at two separated points in said system and preelectrolysis of blood serve the circulatory action thereof, and

for producing contact with the blood of thehuman circulatory system and said anode element, a separate and distinct cathode element of the same nature for contacting the human blood circulatory system with said cathode element, and means for connecting a source of direct current of electricity to said cathode and anode elements whereby electrolysis of the blood is rendered possible during its circulation.

with an anode element at its suction end and adapted to withdraw within said barrel and come in contact therewith blood from a human circulatory system, a second separate and distinct syringe having a hollow barrel, a plunger within said barrel and provided with a cathode element at its suction end and adapted to draw withinsaid barrel and come in contact therewith blood from a human circulatory system, and means for connecting a source of direct current of electricity to said cathode and anode elements whereby electrolysis of the blood is rendered possible during its. circulation.

EPHRAIM iIoRTHoo'rr. JAMES w. WARFORD.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification607/116
International ClassificationA61N1/30
Cooperative ClassificationA61N1/306
European ClassificationA61N1/30B4