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Publication numberUS1537228 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date12 May 1925
Filing date3 Jun 1922
Priority date3 Jun 1922
Publication numberUS 1537228 A, US 1537228A, US-A-1537228, US1537228 A, US1537228A
InventorsGargan John O
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for cooling carrier-wave apparatus
US 1537228 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1925. 1,537,228

J. o. GARGAN MEANS FOR COOLING CARRIER WAVE APPARATUS Filed Jun e 3, 1922 f7 .2 H7 28 2 9 6 2a 50 j I 7/ I a l i g 1g V /2 /2 i 5 s f 1 g U i M 5 6 /6 6 r 8 1 l s L 9mg /6 J, j l: o E

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by i- -M wk Patented May 12, 1925.

UNITEDi sTAras I 1,537,228 PATENT oer-ice.

J'OHN O. GARGAN, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR, TO 'WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY, INCORPORATED, OF NEW YORK,

N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

MEANS FOR COOLING CARRIER-WAVE APPARATUS.

Application filed June S, 1922. Serial No. 565,608.

To all whom it may concern: Be it known that I, JOHN O. GARGAN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Brooklyn, in the county of Kings, State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Means for Cooling Carrier-Wave Apparatus, of which the fol-. lowing is a full, clear, concise, and exact descri tion. 1 p

is invention relates to meansfor cooling radio or other carrier wave apparatus and more particularly to means for cooling radio transmitting apparatus.

In dealing with alternating currents of high frequency, and with said currents in reactive circuits, appreciable quantities of heat are evolved in elements such as condensers and windings which are not ordinarily heated to an appreciable extent by current at the usual power frequencies of 25 and cycles. This may be due in part to dielectric losses, skin effect, leakage due to high voltage between adjacent conductors, resonant currents through closed loops, corona, or because of other effects. Many of the elements employed in connection with high frequency circuits are subject to serious deterioration if heated to any great extent. In the case of the usual dielectric materials for example, increases in temperature cause greatly increased dielectric losses and render the dielectric liable to break down. For these reasons special precautions are desirable in designing a satisfactory radiotransmitter in compact form which will be reasonably free from deterioration due to heating effects.

One object of theinvention is to arrange the elements, such as resistances, condensers, inductances, transformers, vacuum tubes and other heat evolving elements, in a radio transmitter so that said elements may be air-cooled and maintained at a sufliciently low temperature to prevent deterioration or other undesirable effects from taking place due to heat accumulating in any one element.

Another object of the invention is to so direct the currentsof heated air circulating around certain elements evolving heat in a radio transmitter, that other elements in said transmitter will not be substantially affected by the heat so evolved.

Another object of the invention is to direct away from the main stream of conother elements developing an appreciable amount of heat and which are to be cooled by the main stream of conducting air.

In accordance with the present invention a radio transmitter is mounted compactly in a cabinet having an open base for the entrance of cooling air which rises by convection through passages to the top of the cabinet where it passes out through openings. Elements evolving a moderate amount of heat at moderate temperatures, or those easily injured b subjection to heat, are distributed throughout the lower part of the cabinet where each element will be subjected to amcopious flow of cooling air without transmitting a great amount of heat to adjacent elements. At the upper part of the cabinet are located vacuum tubes which evolve large amounts of heat at relatively higher temperatures than the elements below in the main stream of cooling air which enters the base of the cabinet. By arranging the elements in this manner the tubes aid the circulation of air through the lower part of the cabinet without transmitting heat to said elements.

An important feature of the invention consists in mounting substantially all of the resistance elements within an enclosure at the base of the cabinet where they are segregated from the other elements in the main stream of cooling air. This enclosure is opened at the bottom and is provided with a sloping top to direct the cooling air out through openings in the side of the cabinet, so that air in passing through the enclosure is shunt-ed away from the main stream of cooling air entering at the base of the cabinetwithout bein brought into contact with elements withm the cabinet which might be injured thereby. Certain of these resistance elements evolve considerable amounts of heat at higher temperatures than occur in elements located in the main air stream below the vacuum tubes, and for this reason it is important to divert the heat of the resistance units away from the main air stream where they might cause an undesired rise in the temperature of said air and of the adjacent elements.

' jacent vertical sides of the cabinet are a sectional elevation of the same cabinet taken. along the line 22 lookingin the direction indicated by the arrows.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the cabinet 1, containing apparatus for transmitting radio or other carrier waves, is provided with vertical supports 2 of angle iron or other suitable material and provided with transverse members 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, etc. of angle iron or other suitable material which also may serve as supports for apparatus to be housed within the cabinet. At the front of the cabinet is mounted a switchboard panel .8 which supports the variable inductance element 9 and the variable condenser 10.

Near the top of the cabinet vacuum tubes 11 are mounted upon the transverse members 12 of wood which are supported from the angles 6. This construction leaves large apertures between the members 12 so that the air may pass readily upward through the cabinet and. cool the tubes 11. Transformers 13 and 14 and choke coil 15 are supported on transverse members 16 which, in turn, are supported from the angles 5. Fixed condenser 17 and choke coil 18 are supported from transverse members 19 which, in turn, are supported from angles 3. It will be noted that elements 9, 10,- 13,-

14, 15, 17 and 18, which evolve moderate amounts of heat at moderate temperatures, are mounted below vacuum tubes 11 which evolve considerable quantities of heat at considerably higher temperatures than the elements below them.

In view of the fact that certain of the resistance units employed in the radio transmitter cabinet evolve large quantities of heat atrelatively higher temperatures than occur at the surface of the other elements mounted below the tubes 11, it has been found very advantageous to mount all such resistance units 20 at the lower rear side of the cabinet within a separate enclosure 21 which shields the other elements in the cabinet from the heat developed in the resistance units, and at the same time permits the resistance units 20 to be efliciently cooled by air currents diverted away from the main air stream entering at the base of the cabinet. The enclosure or hood 21 is provided with a sloping top 22 which deflects the heated air rising from resistance units 20 in an outward direction through openings 23 in the desired points. vided with end 'rear wall 24 of the" cabinet. The rear wall 24 may be constructed of expanded metal or other suitable type of screening, or may be a panelprovided with openings at the The enclosure 21 is provided with flanges to which the inclined top portions 25 which are pro-- 22 and the verticalportion 27 of sheet metal may be firmly secured.

The inclined top 22 may be made of insulating material, such as phenol fiber, and servesas a support for terminal connections 26 which furnish leads for entering the hood 21.

The top 28 of the cabinet is constructed of expanded metal screening or other suitable material. which provides numerous openings through which the convective stream of cooling air may pass. The sides 29, 30 of the cabinet maylikewise be constructed of expanded metal screening.

The general direction of air currents through the cabinet is indicated by arrows. It will be seen that air entering at the base of the cabinet, due to convection produced by the heated elements in the cabinet, circulates freely upward through the cabinet and out through the top 28, with the exceptlon of a portion of the air which is diverted by the hood 21. This diverted air is expelled through the rear of the cabinet as indicated by the arrows and is thus prevented from reaching and deteriorating the other elements withinthe cabinet or the dielectric insulating the conductors leading between said elements.

It will be obvious that the general principles herein disclosed may be embodied in many other arrangements differing from that illustrated without departing from the invention as defined in the following claims.

What is claimed is: 1. Means for supporting electrical apparatus which is subject to deterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted on said supporting means and means comprising a hood having a sloping top of heat and electric insulating material provided with terminals for separating said resistance unit from said apparatus and for deflecting away from said apparatus air which has been heated by said resistance unit.

2 .Means for supporting electrical apparatus which is subject to deterioration at high temperatures. a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted on said supporting means, means for separating said resistance unit from said apparatus, said separating means comprising a hood having a passage way therethrough for cooling air, and means including a plate of heat and electric insulating material upon which terminals connected to said unit are mounted for defleeting away from said apparatus air heated by said resistance unit. p

3. Means for supporting electrical apparatus which is subJect to deterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted on said supporting means, means for separating said resistance unit from said apparatus, said separating means comprising an enclosure having a passage way therethrough for cooling air, and an inclined top of phenol fibre which serves as a mounting panel and is adapted to deflect away from said apparatus air heated by said resistance unit.

4. Means for supporting electrical apparatus which is subject to deterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted on said supporting means, and a sheet metal compartment havan inclined top of heat and electric insulat ing material upon which terminals for said resistances are mounted for separating said resistance unit from said apparatus and for deflecting away from said apparatus air heated by said resistance unit.

5. A radio transmitter cabinet comprisin a plurality of elements subject to deterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted in said cabinet, a compartment, provided with a top comprising a panel of insulating material for mounting electrical apparatus enclosing said resistance unit and having openings to permit a flow of cooling air therethrough and for discharging said air from said cabinet.

6. A radio transmitter cabinet com rising a plurality of elements subject to d eterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted in said cabinet below said elements, a compartment, the to of said compartment consisting of a pane of insulating material for mounting electrical apparatus enclosing said resistance unit and having openings to permit a flow of cooling air therethrough and for discharging said air from said cabinet.

7. A radio transmitter cabinet comprising a plurality of elements subject to deterioration at high temperatures, a resistance unit which evolves considerable quantities of heat under service conditions mounted in said cabinet, and means, including an inclined panel of heat and electric insulating material having terminals mounted thereon, to direct away from the main stream of cooling air through said vcabinet the air employed for cooling said resistance unit.

8. Means for mounting electrical apparatus comprising a cabinet, the front of said cabinet comprising an insulating panel, the top, back and sides of said cabinet comprisin a metallic screening material for electrig caliv shielding the apparatus mounted in- .Stll

cabinet, a resistance unit generating considerable heat under service conditions mounted in said cabinet, a hood for deflecting heated air produced by said unit away from the other apparatus in said cabinet, said hood including an insulating panel having connecting means for said unit mounted thereon.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 2nd da of June A. D., 1922. J OHN O. GARGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501050 *16 Jun 194721 Mar 1950Abe FranklRadio receiving apparatus in a miniature piano cabinet having movable keys
US2516184 *2 Jul 194825 Jul 1950Christie Soren LCooling system
US2587686 *27 Apr 19484 Mar 1952Berry Robert ROre sorting system
US2618133 *20 Apr 194918 Nov 1952William M KennedyBaffle for air ducts of generator coolers
US2630526 *4 Nov 19483 Mar 1953Zelov Victor IHousing for radio receivers
US2791621 *17 Jan 19527 May 1957Gen Electric Co LtdElectrical apparatus
US2893704 *20 May 19577 Jul 1959Collins Radio CoCooling system
US2895044 *1 Nov 195414 Jul 1959R E B IncRadio construction
US2902597 *12 Sep 19561 Sep 1959Harold W LeidyAir-borne packaging unit for electronic equipment
US2947957 *22 Apr 19572 Aug 1960Zenith Radio CorpTransformers
US3201654 *26 Dec 196117 Aug 1965Thompson Ramo Wooldridge IncImage converter camera
US3407869 *16 Jan 196729 Oct 1968Perkin Elmer CorpInstrument cooling system
US4327398 *4 Sep 197927 Apr 1982Product Technologies, Inc.Cooling system for automatic bowling pin spotter
US4505598 *8 Jun 198219 Mar 1985Vdo Adolf Schindling AgCase for a clock
US6422730 *22 Dec 200023 Jul 2002Super Vision International, Inc.Fiber optic light source with two chamber cooling
US713050717 Oct 200331 Oct 2006Exfo Photonic Solutions Inc.Light source unit for use with a light guide and lamp mounting arrangement
US72421357 Mar 200610 Jul 2007Communication And Power Industries, Inc.High voltage connection for vacuum electron device
US733169920 Sep 200619 Feb 2008Exfo Photonics Solutions Inc.Light source unit
US7359206 *7 Mar 200615 Apr 2008Communications And Power Industries, Inc.Radio frequency isolation system and cover assembly for vacuum electron device
US73842937 Mar 200610 Jun 2008Communication And Power Industries, Inc.Breach lock mechanism for seating vacuum electron device
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/692, 455/128, 455/117, 313/36, 361/678, 361/724, 313/35, 165/80.3
International ClassificationH04B1/02, H04B1/03
Cooperative ClassificationH04B1/03
European ClassificationH04B1/03