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Publication numberUS1356379 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date19 Oct 1920
Filing date9 Aug 1919
Priority date9 Aug 1919
Publication numberUS 1356379 A, US 1356379A, US-A-1356379, US1356379 A, US1356379A
InventorsMcdermott Carl
Original AssigneeMcdermott Carl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical coin-delivery machine
US 1356379 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. MCDERMOTT- ELECTRICAL com DELIVERY MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.9| I919.

Patented Oct. 19, 1920.

6 SHEETS-SHEET I.

mmvmn ('arl ill fiemmil 4 TTORNE rs C. MCDERMOTT.

ELECTRICAL COIN DELIVERY MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED AUGLQ. I919.

6 SHEEI'SSHEET 2.

Patented Oct. 19, 1920.

9 .Liiiiifi J m/31 70:? Carl m flermali WITNESSES C. McDERMOTT.

ELECTRICAL COIN DELIVERY MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.9. 19w.

1,356,379. Patented Oct. 19,1920.

6 SHEETS SHEET 3.

ATTORNEYS c. MCDERMOTT. ELECTRICAL COIN DELIVERY MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG-.5. IBIS). 1356,3179, Patented 0012.19, 1920.

6 SHEETSSIIEET 4.

I I g 1 1 I I I b Z 135 4 5 35 H {I -/0 I I 2 vI if I7 7 O I, 0 j I; I A 8 iiwfi i l Z8 Z 7 C 5 I i i I 52 l0 I l/ l i 5/ l Hi 52 so I 1 F "11 "if t'"" 3 I o 27 o WITNESSES I INI/ENIOI? Mn (1 V CWVF Carl JWFDermaib A TTOR/VE Y8 C. MCDERMOTT.

ELECTRICAL COIN DELIVERY MACHINE.

APPUCAHON FILED AUG Q, 1919.

1,356,379. Patented 0%194920.

A TTOR/VE Y8 C. McDERMOTT. ELECiRICAL com DELl VERY MACHINE.

APPLlCATION FILED'MUG- 9. .i9 1 9.

Patented Oct. 19, 1920.

6 SHEETSSHEET 5.

PIE?

INVENTOR Carl m flermoii BY J ATTORNEYS WI TN E SSE S ydhri w UNITED STA CARL MGDERMQTT, OF FREEHOLD, NEW JERSEY.

EIECTBICAL COIN-DELIVERY MACHINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 19, 1920.

Application filed August 9, 1919. Serial No. 316,471.

T 0 (Ill 10 7mm it may concern Be it known that I, CARI. MoDERMorT, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Freehold, county of Monmouth, and State of New Jersey, have invented a new and Improved Electrical Coin-Delivery hiachine, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to coin delivery machines, and more particularly to an electrically operated coin delivery machine.

An object of the, invention is to provide a coin delivery machine for use in banks, merchandise establishments, and other institutions where silver coin is handled in making many change transactions.

It is a. purpose to provide a coin delivery machine consisting primarily of a coin delivery unit electrically controlled by a key board unit, so that the cashier or operator of the machine may be distant from the coin delivery unit.

It is an object to provide a coin delivery machine which will properly function even though operated by unskilled persons. To this end the machine is so electrically controlled that the key board mechanism may be engaged for a long period of time without damage to the mechanism or without obtaining more than one cycle of operation. Or the key board may be instantly released, and yet the machine will complete its cycle of operation to deliver the correct amount of change. In fact, it is an object to pro duce a coin delivery machine inherently simple and positive in operation under all conditions.

A. special feature of the coin delivery unit resides in the provision of means for automatically stopping the cycle of operation in case a coin becomes jammed or clogged in the machine. This machine will either positively deliver or eject all" coins simultaneously, or it will not deliver any coins at all; in other words should one coin become clogged during the cycle of operation no delivery will take place, thus avoiding possibility of incorrect change being made.

A special. feature of the machine resides in a release drive mechanism electrically operated. This release drive is interposed between an electric motor and the delivery mechanism and is employed to permit all parts to return to normal inactive position after one coin ejecting operation has been completed.

Another feature of the coin delivery machine relates to a plurality of jointly operat mg coin punchers operated simultaneously but separately selected to engage the coins of desired denomination in order that any amount of change may be delivered.

A further feature resides in means for selectively lifting into position the desired coin punchers so that coin of required denominational value may be ejected by said selected coin punchers.

Further objects and features relate to a combined electrical and mechanical means for executing the positive delivery of the selected coins. To this end, there is employed a system of electro-selectively operated devices directly controlled from the distantly located key board which is operated by the bank cashier or other person.

The above enumeration points out many of the important objects of the invention, with reference to features of the mechanism. A practical example of a coin delivery machine is portrayed in the following description, particularly pointed out in the appended claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 shows a perspective view ofthe coin delivery unit with the delivery chute mounted thereon, and with a coin trough carried upon the machine. The coin delivery chute is arranged to deliver the coin on the front side of the machine, while the coin trough has its back turned toward the front of said machine which places the coins carried in the trough away from the customer who receives coins from the deliy'ery chute. The coin chute may be extended through the cage of the cashiers otlice so the customer may readily receive the coin.

Fig. 2 points out a side elevation of the machine with the casing in section, or removed therefrom. as to disclose the machine parts of the coin delivery machine.

Fig. 3 shows a back view of the machine, or a view looking" toward the coins in the coin trough. This view is obtained by removing the rear wall of the casing. and shows the solenoid selector means employed to select appropriate coin punchers, and shows parts of the driving mechanism.

Fig. 4 shows a plan view of the machine with the casing removed. This view discloses the plurality of coin punching arms located above the solenoid selectors, and the power motor with parts of the power transmission.

Fig. 5 shows a fragmentary side elevation of the coin delivery mechanism. In this view the mechanism is in operation with a coin partly ejected from the trough ready to pass into the delivery chute.

Fi 6 shows a view similar to that of Fig. This is aside elevation, and a fragmentary view. The deliverymechanism has undergone partial operation but owing to the jamming of one of the coins the machine has automatically cut off its operation and is shown in a position ready to return to normally inactive position.

Fig. 7 shows a sectional view taken upon the line 7-7 of Fig. 5. This figure relates to the mechanism employed for automatically cutting off the operation of the machine in case a coin jams or clogs at the outset of the operation.

Fig. 8 discloses a diagrammatic lay-out of the electric controllin system of the coin delivery mechanism. his figure shows the electrical control elements connected with a preferred form of keyboard.

Fig. 9 shows a fragmentary detail view of the coin trough and ejector head mounted in guided relation with said trough, and Fig. 10 shows a view taken upon the line 10l0 of Fig. 9.

It is desirable to employ an effectively operating key board selector unit with the coin delivery unit. To this end I have (lisclosed the design of a keyboard constituting an invention separate from the one herewith presented. This key board selector unit is disclosed in an aiplication for patent filed in the United i tates Patent Office on the 9th day of August, 1919, under the Serial No. of 316.470.

In the present application. andin Fig. 8, is shown a diagrammatical layout of a bank of electrical contact bars which constitutes the subject matter of the aforesaid application pointed out by the cross reference.

Tn constructing a machine under the specifications and claims of this disclosure, I employ an inclosed casing in which is mounted an electric motor or other power means. A coin holder trough is mounted on the upper portion of the machine and provided with a number of grooves into which the cashier or operator will place stacks of coins arranged in order of denominational value. There is employed a plurality of jointly operating coin punchers which function to eject a single coin with each puncher from each stack' of coins. Filectro-selective means are employed for each individual coin puncher in order that one or more punchers may be lifted in position so as to eject a coin as it travels forward.-

Referring now more in particular to the views'for structural description and operation, wherein the same machine parts are designated by the same reference chararters throughout, the numeral 1 points out a base fitted with pads 2. The base is provided with a casing comprising side walls 3 and a top 4:. A delivery chute is secured to the side of the machine and consists of a tube 5 secured vertically to one side or face of the casin The upper portion of this chute is open and connects with the delivery mechanism confined within the casing. while the lower portion of the tube curves outwardly in position to deliver coins to the recipient. The coin delivery opening of the chute is indicated by the numeral 6. Upon the upper portion of the casing is fitted a coin trough 7. This coin trough is provided with a number of trough grooves cut in the face thereof into which are'placed stacks of coins. The coin trough will preferably have about the same number of coin grooves or receptacles as there are denominational values of coins in circulation. The trough 7 will preferably be mounted on the machine in such a manner as to make it easily removable to facilitate manufacture and assembly.

A pair of frames 8 are erected vertically on the base and spaced apart. Each frame is provided with a journal 9 integrally formed on the upper part ofthe frame or leg members 8. The legs 8 of the frame are secured to the base by bolts or screws. The two journals 9 rotatably mount a main rock shaft 10. A. gear sector 11 is associated with the rock shaft and adapted to rotate therewith during operation of the machine; but so connected as to move freely thereon should a coin become jammed during a cycle of operation. The gear sector 11 is formed integrally with a hub 12, the hub 12 being journaled upon the rock shaft. An arm 14 is integrally formed with a hub, the hub being fixed upon the rock shaft 10 by a pin 15 or other appropriate means. The, arm 1a and gear sector 11 are positioned adjacent each other on the shaft with a little splice left between the arm and the gear sector. A stop pin 16 is fixed to the gear sector, and adapted to freely pass by the arm 14 in the space left between the arm and said gear sector. The lower portion of the arm 1.4. is provided with a reach-bar 17, and on the outer end. of this'reach-bar is made ahook 18. The reach-bar 1? lies adjacent the rim of the gear sector with the hook 18 turned back to engage the edge of said sector and lying in contiguous relation therewith. Re

ferring to Fig. the arrow indicates the direction of rotation of the shaft10,-ai1'd it is seen that the gear sector 11 may rotate in the direction indicated by the arrow without necessarily movingthe arm 14, but the arm it cannot move in the direction of the arrow without carrying the sector with it due to positive engagement of the hook 18 with the sector 11. A coil tension spring 19 has one end thereof connected with the arm 14 and the other arm thereof connected to an adjustment rod 20. This adjustment rod is pivoted upon the forward portion of the gear sector as designated by 21 and travels with the sector.v A boss 22 shown in Fig. 2, is made on the hub of the' gear sector, and in this boss is formed a hole in which is slidably mounted a screw threaded member 23. This member is connected to the adjustment rod 20 through a pivot pin 24. A nut 25 is employed to adjust the member 23 back and forth in the boss 22. In this manner the adjustment rod 20 is moved about its pivotal point 21, which tightens or loosens the spring 19 according to the desired adjustment of the mechanism. The spring 19 will have sufficient tension to confine the arm and gear sector in joined movable relation during the operation of the machine. but will have sufficient resilience to permit the gear sector and arm to move relatively one upon the other should any portion of the coin delivery mechanism become locked or clogged as hereinafter described.

A drive shaft 27 is employed to rotate the gear sector, and to accomplish this a worm 28 is fixed to the drive shaft 27. The drive shaft is supported at one end thereof by a journal bearing 29. This bearing 29 is carried between a pair of lifting arms 30, said arms being spaced apart and pivoted at 31 upon a support 32. The support 32 is fixed to the base 1 of the machine. The upper ends of the lift arms are provided with a pivot 33 which permits the lift-' ing arms 30 to swing about the pin 31 to slide the bearing 29 along the shaft 27. A solenoid 34 is fitted with a guide tube 35, and a solenoid plunger 36 is slidably confined within the guide tube. The plunger is bifurcated at the end thereof and provided with a pivot pin 37 joined with a link 38. The other end of the shaft 27 is fitted with a knuckle 39 which connects with a universal joint formed in the end of a main shaft 10. This shaft 40 is journaled in a standard 41 secured to the base 1. The shafts 27 and 40 are, therefore, connected one with the other through a universal joint which permits the outer end of shaft 27 to be swingable up and down in order that the worm 28 may be engaged with the gear sector 11. The solenoid 34 and associate parts exercise a control over the shaft 27 to en'- gage the worm with the gear sector. The views 5 and 6 show the gear sector and worm' in operative engagement. This engagement is maintained by virtue of energization of the solenoid 34 which draws the plunger 36 inwardly to swing the shaft 27 upwardly until the worm and gear are engaged. This movement of the solenoid is executed against the tension of a spring 42. This spring has one end thereof connected to the bearing 29 and the other end thereof connected to the support 32. \Vhen the solenoid 34 is deenergized the tension of the spring 42 acts toreturn all parts to normal position by pulling the bearing 29 out wardly on the shaft, which disengages the worm and gear sector, as shown in Fig. 2. The means of controlling the energization of the solenoid 34 will form the subject of a later description within this specification. A sprocket 4a is fixed to -;the shaft 40. Means for transmitting rotation to the sprocket 44 and thus operating the above described mechanism will now be described. An electric motor 16 is secured to the base 1, and a sprocket 47 is fixed to the motor shaft. A chain 48 is confined on the sprockets 44 and 47 to transmit rotation to the shaft 27. The operation of the motor is controlled from a key board remotely located from the coin delivery unit, said operation being carried out when the circuit through the motor is closed by the operator to tie liver coins to the chute. In order to limit themotion of all parts, a pair of stops 136 are fixed to the frame. A swinging arm 135 is fixed to the shaft 10 with the lower end of said arm disposed between the stops 136. These parts are shown in Fig. 2. When the swinging arm 135 has engaged the uppermost stop the machine rests supported in that position until another cycle of operation is carried out. A pin 137 is fixed to the shaft 10. and a tension spring 135 has one end thereof attached to the outer end of the pin 137, and the other end thereof attached to the base or some part of the frame so as to draw the mechanism into rearwardly limited non-operative position against a stop 136. The spring acts to hold the machine in inactive position ready to undergo operation. When the machine undergoes a complete cycle. the swinging arm 135 engages the lowermost stop 136. which stops the travel of the machine in that direction sin'iultuncously with the disengagement of the worm 28. which permits the spring 138 to return the parts to normally inactive position. The above complete description covers the assembly of parts from the motor through the transmission to the shaft 10.

llpstanding arms 50 are fixed to the rock shaft 10. The arms 50 are spaced apart and preferably fixed to shaft 10 near each end of said shaft. A rod 51 is fixed in the upper ends of the arms 50. The parts 50 and 51 mount a plurality of coin punch arms employed to selectively eject the required amount of coins from the machine. The several coin punchers are designated by the reference characters 5, 10" and 10", 25 and 50. These coin punchers consist of a rod one end of which is fitted into a hub extension 52, shown in Fig. 4, said hub extension being integrally made with a bearing 53. The bearing 53 is journaled on the rod 51 which permits the coin punchers to pivot thereabout. On the free end of each coin puncher is fixed an ejector head adapted to engage a coin as the coin punchers travel forward. This member consists of a finger 54 inte rally formed with a guide 55, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10. Since each coin puncher is pivoted on the shaft 51, the ejector heads may be raised or lowered into operative engagement with the coins in the trough as later seen.

A guided relation exists between each ejector head and the coin trough 7. The

coin trough 7 is provided with a coin support plate 57 which is fixed to the lower edge of the upstanding trough member 7. The coin plate 57 is provided with a slot 58. The slot 58 is approximately the width of the finger 54 of the ejector head, and said ejector head is slidably confined in slot 58. The upper face of the guide 55 moves contiguously with the underneath face of the coin late 57. A coin ejector slot 59, as shown in ig. 2 isformed in the lower portion of the trough just'above the coin plate 57. Coins may be punched through the slot 59 by the coin punchers, as later seen. The aforedescribed chute 5 passes through the casing and a coin chute 60 is mounted adjacent the lower portion of the coin trough. This coin chute 60 opens directly to the coin slot 59. The delivery chute 5 and the coin chute 60 are connected so that a coin which drops into the chute 60 will pass directly to the delivery chute 5. Thus the chutes 60 and 5 connect together to form a continuous tubu lar member through which the coin passes until it is discharged at the mouth 6 of the delivery chute. In order to hold the coins in positive position prior to the ejecting operation there is employed a retaining ball 61, as shown in Fig. 9 which is movably confined in a bore formed in the trough memher. A spring 62 is placed in the bore back of the ball to press the ball normally downward into engagement with the upper face of the coin plate 57. This retaining ball 61 is mounted forward of'each coin groove and prevents a coin from passing through the slot 59. \Vhen, however, a coin is thrust forward under the ejecting impulse'of a coin puncher the ball 61 will be displaced u'pwardly, which permits said coin to be ejected through the slot 59.

As above described, means is provided to hold the coin punchers and ejector heads in operative engagement within the coin plate. To this end solenoids are employed to lift each coin puncher upwardly until the finger 54 is in line with the rim of the coin. Fig.

2 shows the ejector head in downward posi- I tion prior to being lifted in line with the coin. Fig. 5 shows one coin puncher in upwardy limited position engaged with the rim of a coin and ready to eject said coin from the coin trough into the chute 60.

A number of solenoids designated in the drawings by 64, 65, 66, 67 and (58 are individually placed under each coin puncher and function to lift the coin punchers into operative punching position. These solenoids are respectively arranged to operate the coin punching members 5, l0 and 10, 25 and 50. Each solenoid consists of an electro magnetic coil fitted with a tubular guide 70. The tubular guide 70 projects from the lower end of the magnetic coil 69 and passes through a hole formed in a horiz'ontalsupport tube 71. This tube 71 is disposed between the two frame legs 8, .and

as a part of the frame upon which the device is assembled. The'tube 70 is provided with a solenoid plunger 72. The upper end of this solenoid plunger is fitted with an insulating head 73 which is fixed to the upper reduced end of the plunger 72. This head is provided with a shoulder which seats against the upper end of the tube and thus limits the downward movement of the solenoid plunger. The lower portion of the plunger 70 .is knurled or grooved. This provides a roughened or irregular cylindrical surface. A hole is drilled through the tube 71 and the guide 70. These-holes register one 'with the other, and a locking head 74 is slidably mounted in the registered holes with the forward end thereof in aposition capable of frictionally engaging the knurled surface of the plunger 72. The head 74 is provided with a stem 75 upon which is con fined a coil compression spring 7 6. A shaft 77 is horizontally pivotally arranged between the two support frames 8. This shaft 77 has fixed thereto a depending arm 78, and in the lower portion of this arm is provided a hole 79. The outer end of the stem 75 is loosely retained in the hole 7 9 with the spring 76 confined on the stem between the arm 78 and the head 74. Thus as the shaft that the lifting arm 80 may be actuated to control the engagement of the locking head 74 with the plunger 72. The compression spring 76 will be so adjusted that it will hold the head 74 at rest in the tube 71 without engaging the knurled plunger,-this,being the normally inactive position of parts. The above description is directed to one of the solenoids employed for controlling the lifting operation of the coin .punchers. Each solenoid is provided with the plunger and locking means as described. The shaft 77 and the lifting arm 80 are common to all of the solenoids, while an individual arm 78 is employed for each separate solenoid so that the plungers of all solenoids will be locked when the machine is in operation, and released when .the machine has completed its work.

An upstanding rod 83 is fixed in the shaft 10, and adapted to move with this shaft. The upper end of this rod is shaped to function as a cam to lift the arm 80. The rod 83 has a horizontal bend 8% as shown in Fig. 4 right angular with-the body 83, and the bend 84 is shaped on an upward curve as shown at 85 as shown in Fig. 5. The upwardly curved extremity 85 is arranged in line with the finger 81. A rod 86 is integrally made with the lift arm 80. This rod 86 is arranged approximately vertical with the upper end thereof reduced in size and bent over in the form of a hook and welded to the lift arm. The upper end of the rod 86 is shaped in the form of a hook so as to space said rod apart from the arm 80 in order that the cam 85 may have freedom of movement in its backward and forward direction to engage and disengage the lift arm 80. The lower end of the arm 86 is bifurcated to receive the upper end of a solenoid plunger 87. The upper end of the plunger 87 is flattened and slotted, as shown in Fig. 2, and slidably confined in the furcation' of the rod 86. A pin is employed to attach the rod 86 and plunger 87 together. The slot allows slight lateral motion of either member in order to avoid cramping of parts during operation. Thisplunger 87 is slidably confined in a solenoid 88. This solenoid is supported on a post 88; Vhen energized the solenoid will discharge the plunger 87 upwardly to lift the arm 80 so the finger 81 will be above the cam 85. Thus when the arm 80 is lifted in upward position the cam in its forward travel will engage the underneath side of the finger 81 which thrusts the heads 74 against all of the solenoid plungers. When this operation takes place all of the plungers 72 are clamped irrespective of their position. All or a part of the plungers 72 may be in an upwardly limited position or may be down, and in either case they are clamped and held during the time the solenoid 88 is energized while the shaft 10 is traveling in its cycle of partial rotation.

A bracket 90 as shown in Fig. 5 is fixed to the base and mounts a yoke 91. A solenoid 92 is mounted in the yoke 91, and a solenoid plunger is slidably carried within the solenoid and guided by the yoke. The solenoid core consists of a plunger 93 mounted on an iron rod 94, said rod provided with a weight 94 fixed to the lower end thereof. The plunger is fitted with a brass rod 96 upon the upper end of which is mounted a fiber head 97. It is preferable to employ brass for the rod 96 while iron will be used for the rod 94. This will cause the solenoid core to properly function by moving upwardly when said solenoid coil is energized.

The solenoid just described is employed to automatically break or open the main circuit after said motor has completed its cycle of operation. To this end, a switch comprising contact bars 98 and 99 is mounted on a fiber base 100. The bar 98 is pivoted on the insulating base, while the contact bar 99 may be fixed to said base. Each contact bar is provided with contact heads, and the one member 98 is somewhat longer than its companion contact bar, which arrangement positions the head 98 of the solenoid directly un-. derneath the end .of the circuit breaker member 98. A lever 101 is pivoted upon the fiber base and one end thereof remains in normal engagement with the underneath face of the head 98. By pivoting the lever 101 the contact head 98 will pivot the switch part 98 upwardly and away from the switch part 99 breaking the electrical circuit main as later seen. A circuit breaker arm 102 is fixed to the rock shaft 10, with the outer end thereof disposed in line with the outer end of the lever 101. lVhen the rock shaft 10 rotates, the circuit breaker arm 102 tilts the lever 101 so as to thrust the solenoid plunger and head 98 upwardly to part or break the circuit switch 9899. The mechanism just described functions as a mechanical circuit breaker and comes into operation simultaneously with the completion of the coin punching action of the machine.

An auxiliary means is employed for opening the circuit breaker or circuit parts 98-99 in case a coin jams or in case the machine does not properly function. In order to accomplish this a circuit breaker arm 104 as shown in Figs. 2 and (3 is pivoted on the frame at 105. A counterbalanced weight 106 is attached to the circuit breaker arm 104 to keep the bifurcated end 107 in upwardly limited position. The refer ence numeral 105 designates a shaft or rod which is horizontally j ournaled in the frame by having one end thereof journaled in the standard 41, while the other end thereof is journaled in the bracket 90. The circuit breaker arm 104 is fixed to one end of this shaft 105, while the other end of the shaft is provided with a breaker arm 108 as shown in Fig. 4 which has its outer end bent in the form of a lift finger 109, said lift finger ter- 20 said arm in case there is relative movement pin impinges the arm 112.

minating in a position under and forward of the pivotal point of the lever 101 as shown in Fig. 6. Thus when the shaft 105 is partially rotated by swinging the circuit breaker arm 104., the arm 108 tilts upwardly the lever 101 which thrusts the head 97 against the circuit breaker 98 thereby opening the circuit. A depending rod 110 is 'pivotally mounted at 111 on the arm 14. The numeral 111 designates a pin fixed to the depending rod and pi'votally mounted in the arm 14. The inner end of the pin 111 is 'rovided with an arm 112 fixed thereto. he parts 110, 111 and 112 comprise a swinging member, the upper portion 112 of which is mounted on the inside of the arm 14, while the lower member 110 is mounted on the outside of the arm 1 1 and freely swings about the pivot. The arm 112 is mounted in line with thestop pin.16 so that said stop pin will engage between the arm 14; and gear sector 11.

llhe mechanism described in the preceding paragraph provides a safety circuit breaking means whiclris automatically brought into use in case a coin jams. By referring particularly to Fig. 6 it is seen how that coin puncheris engaged with a coin which has become jammed in the trou 'h and fails to eject through the slot 59. hen this occurs, which occasionally will, due to bent coins or other irregularities, the gear sector 11 moves forward under the driving impulse of the electric motor, and being freely journaled on the shaft 10 does not move the coin punching mechanism. The coin punchers are moved only when the arm 14 is carried forward during rotation of the gear sector, and since the coin punchers are locked against movement the spring 19 undergoes tension and stretches until the stop This throws the depending rod 110 forward to trip the circuit breaker arm 104: which opens the motor circuit thereby stopping said motor; The worm gear will be disengaged and the spring 19 cause the parts to return. to normal inactive position. When the worm disengages the sector, the hook 18 on the reach-bar stops the movement of the gear sector, and the spring 19 is so adjusted to remain under sufficient tension to cause the hook 18-t0 continuously engage the face of the gear sector. Thus the gear sector and the arm 141 are joined together through the spring 19, which spring forms a yieldable' connection between the transmission and the coin punching mechanism. This yieldable connection prevents damage and breakage of parts when the machine fails to function due to jamming of coins or other imperfect functioning. During normal operation, and when the coins are readily ejectable from the machine, the spring 19 is sufficiently strong to move the arm 14 along with. the

gear sector when said sector undergoes rotation.

The electric motor circuit, and other circuits necessary to energize the several solenoids employed, are under direct control of the operator. When a selected key is depressed the motor circuit and appropriate solenoids become energized, The electric motor must necessarily undergo one complete operation, or cycle, in order that the coins will be punched from the trough and ejected through the chutes. The operator may occasionally hold the key down to close the circuits sufiiciently long to complete the cycle of operation, but quite often the operator might fail to hold said key down sufficiently long to complete the operation. Means are provided for automatically bringmg into operation an independent circuit which furnishes current to the motor until said motor has completed its cycle of operation. This independent circuit functions regardless of the length of time the operator holds down the key. 1

To this. end there is employed a relay 114, as shown in Figs. 3 and 41. This relay is supported on a suitable bracket 115. The relay more clearly appears in the diagrammatic view of Fig. 8 where the electromagnet is shown with a contact head, and an armature pivoted at 116. The armature 117 1s prqvided with a weight so as to keep this armature and contact head normally disengaged from the contact head on the electromagnet 114 when said magnet is deenergized. The upper portion 118 of the armature is also provided with contact points and joins with the main supplyline through a circuit 131 employed to furnish current to this machine. The circuit wire 131 con- 105 nects with the relay magnet 114, and also connects with the relay armature. The other end of this circuit wire 131 connects with an electric current main 121 which supplies the motor. Therefore, when the relay 11 15 in closed position, as shown in Fig. 8, the current from the battery 119 flows to the motor through the independent circuit wire 131 which furnishes current to the disengaged from the circuit bars, then the current will flow to the motor through the wire 131. Therefore, if the operator releases the key 95 before the cycle of operation is completed, the relay 11 1 and independent circuit 131 functions to supply the motor until the operation of the machine has been completed.

A battery or other source of current 119 supplies the main circuit line 120. This circuit line 120 connects with a key board.

'Another section of the current main is the electric current main 123, this electric circuit 124 has connected in series therewith the electric motor 46. A circuit wire 125 connects in parallel with the motor supply circuit 124, said circuitwire 125 joining with the solenoid 88 to energize same during the time the motor runs. Likewise'the solenoid 34 connects in parallel through the circuit'wires 126 to the motor circuit 124.

A key board is employed for fiperating the coin delivery mechanism. his key board comprises a plurality of contact bars which are fitted with suitable keys so that the operator may depress the appropriate key in order to close the circuit through the proper electro control elements so that the correct number of coins may be discharged from the chute. A ground plate 127 is provided with a plurality of key elements. One of the key elements is shown in Fig. 8 and designated by 95. This key comprises the button 95 formed on the upper end of the rod 128. The number 95 printed on the button indicates the amount'of change which will be delivered when the button is depressed, and the key board will be provided with a number of keys ascending in value in multiples of 5 to 100. Hence the operator may deliver change as desired from one five cent piece up to one dollar.

Contact bars 5 are employed in the keyboard and connect with the circuit wire 64. The several contact bars-5 are, therefore,

' connected directly to the solenoid 64 which controls the operation of the coin puncher 5. A bridge 5, diagrammatically shown, joins the several contact bars 5", and the circuit wire 6 1 connects to the bridge.

A number of contact bars 1O are shown and joined together by a bridge 10, and the circuit wire 65 connects to-the bridge 10 This arrangement places the solenoid 65 in electrical connection with the bars 10".

A number of contact bars 50 are used in the key board and joined together by a bridge 50, and the circuit wire. 68 is connected with the bridge 50. This places the solenoid 68 in electrical connection with the contact bars 50".

A number of contact bars 25* are shown in the key board joined together by the bridge 25. This bridge is in direct electrical connection with the solenoids 67 through the circuit wire 67.

Thus the key elements shown in Fig. 8 are arranged in groups, each group being connected to its individual solenoid inorder that said solenoid may be energized to lift. the coin puncher if current'flows from any one of the bars of that particular group. The rod 128 is disposed between two vertical banks of contact bars. The rod is provided with contact balls'or points which engage the desired contact bars. In this instance the key is designated by 95 which in fact means that 95 will be delivered from the coin punching mechanism when said button is depressed. In order that 95 in silver be delivered it will be necesary that the mechanisin deliver one 50 piece, one 25 piece. and two 10 pieces. To this end. the key rod 128 is fitted with contact balls or points which will engage two of the 10 contact bars, and one of the 25 contact bars and finally one 50 contact bar. hen the key is depressed into position shown the con- .tact points engage said bars thus connecting up the solenoids 65, 66, 67 and 68 with the key board. The rod 128 transmits the current from the ground plate 127 upwardly to distribute said current through the various contact bars. The electric current main 120 connects with the ground plateand feeds upwardly through proper contact bars until the desired solenoid-s are energized to lift the proper coin punchers into operative position. The key and rod 128 in Fig. 8 are shown depressed so that the contact balls are engaged with the bars. The lower end of the rod 128 may have fixed thereto one end of a coil spring. not shown, while the other end of said spring is fixed to the plate 127. A tubular casing .130 is fixed to the ground plate and may have the spring above referred to concealed within said tube. This 116 arrangement of parts will cause the key rod 128 to remain normally upward when in inactive position, since the coil compression spring will function to return the rod 128 upwardly and disengage the contact balls as 123 soon as the operator releases the button.

A plurality of contact bars 16 are also em loyed in the key board and joined toget ier by abridge 46. The motor circuit wire 12 1 is connected to the bridge 16. 125 This places the motor 46 in series with the key board and electric current main 120. The rod 128 also has a contact ball which engages one of the bars 46*, and when so engaged the current is transmitted upwardly 130 from the plate 127 through the bar 46, through the bridge 16 to the motor, and thus completes the circuit through the electric current main to said motor.

A circuit wire 132 connects with the electric current main 122, said circuit 132 including the solenoid 92 in series therewith. This circuit 132 connects with contact bars 92". The key rod 128 is fitted with a contact ball which will engage the contact bar 92" when said key is depressed to start the machine in operation. Thus the solenoid 92 is in series with the key board and electric current main. The contact bars 92* are preferably somewhat deeper than the other contact bars constituting the key board. This provides a longer. contacting area on the contact bars 92 than is provided on the other contact bars. The bar 92" has its bottom edge even or in the same plane with the bottom edges of the other contact bars which causes the upper edge to be spaced somewhat above the upper edge of the narrower bars. Thus when the key is depressed a contact ball engages the bar 92 before any of the other bars are engaged. This action causes instant energization of the solenoid 92 slightly prior to the energization of the other electrical elements of the system. Likewise this construction causes the solenoid 92 to be the last member denergized means 102 impinges downwardly on the lever 101 which thrusts the plunger 93 upwardly against the magnetic pull of the solenoid coil 92. At this instant of operation, the plunger 93 firmly adheres to the upper portion of the solenoid coil due to the magnetic attraction thereof, and due to the fact that the plunger 93 has been forced upwardly past the magnetic center of the solenoid. Thus the circuit breaker 98 is held in upward and open position due to the mechanical breaking of said circuit when the breaker arm 102 impinged the lever 101.

The foregoing paragraph described the operation of the machine when the cashier or operator holds the key 95 down for a longer period than is necessary to cause the machine to function. It often occurs that an operator may press the key downwardly and hold the circuit closed, and in such case itbecomes necessary that the circuit be mechanically broken in order that the machine will not undergo a repetition of coin punching actions. The mechanical circuit breaking means, consisting of the elements 98, 101, 102, and others. are specially employed for the purpose of opening the circuit and stopping the electric motor when the operator inadvertently and unnecessarily holds the key down. After the breaker arm 102 impinges upon the lever 101, said arm 102 will return to normal position and release the lever 101. Even though the lever 101 is released the lifting head 97 will remain in upward position and keep the circuit 122-123 broken, due to the continued energization of the solenoid 92 as long as the operator holds the key down. Thus the means described will positively prevent the machine from functioning more than one time. Even though the operator holds the key in depressed position long after the coins are 'delivered, the machine Wlll not undergo operation again until the key is released and punched for another coin ejection movement.

A partial description of the operation of the coin delivery mechanism has been given. A complete recitation of the simultaneous energization of the various solenoids and other electrical elements will now be taken up. It will be assumed that the machine is in inactive position and the button 95 in Fig. 8 is depressed to discharge 95 in silver to a customer through the chute 6. Instantly the key goes downwardly, the contact point on the rod 128 engages one of the circuit bars 92 which energizes the solenoid 92 and attracts the plunger 93 downwardly so as to securely hold the head 97 out of engagement with the circuit breaker 98. When the key 95 has been depressed, the circuit wires 65, 66, 67 and 68 are brought into direct electrical connection with the electric current main 120. This action energizes the solenoids 65, 66, 67 and 68, since said solenoids are connected to the battery through the wires 122 and 123. The energized solenoids instantly discharge their plungers upwardly and lift the coin punchers 10 and 10, 25" and 50 into position within the slot of the coin plate. The rod 128 also engages the contact bar 46" which closes the circuit through the electric motor 46 and starts same to running. Simultaneously with this action, the solenoids 3-1 and 88 are energized. When the solenoid 34 is energized, the worm 28 is engaged with the gear sector 11, and likewise the solenoid 88 functions to lift the arm 80 upwardly so that the cam 85 may engage the finger 81. The motor is now running, which causes the gear sector to travel forward pulling with it the arm 14c. The arm 14 rotates the shaft 10 which causes the coin punchers to move forward in their respective slots in the coin plate until the rim of a coin is engaged.

taining ball 61 which moves upwardly from the path of travel of the coin thus permitting the coin to be ejected into the chute 60.

Thus four coin punchers have moved for-.

ward and two 10 pieces, one 25 piece, and one 50 piece have been ejected into the chute 60. The 95 button was not provided with a contact ball which closed a 5 contact bar, hence the solenoid 64 was not energized and a 5e piece was not ejected.

When the button 95 was depressed, the current was passed through the relay 114 which attracted the armature 117 to close the contact heads on the member 118. This action on the part of the relay 114- closed the inde pendent circuit 131 from the battery to the motor. Thus current supplied directly from the battery to the motor, and the sole-' noids which were energized at the time the button was depressed. In case the operator released the key 95, the operation of the mechanism will not be discontinued. The

motor, therefore, runs until the circuit is mechanically broken. The opening or breaking of the circuit is effected through the circuit breaker means hereinbefore described consisting of the circuit breaker arm 102.

Assume now that a bent coin becomes jammed or clogged, which prevents the machine from functioning. If one coin clogs, none of the coins will be ejected; because if one coin puncher is prevented from completing it punching movement, all coin punchs ers will likewise be prevented. The motor will complete a few revolutions even though the coin is jammed, and run until the stop pin 16 travels forward to engage the arm 112 which swings the depending rod 110 into engagement with the bifurcated member 104. This rotates the shaft 105, which thrusts the breaker arm 108 upwardly against the lever 101 and thus breaks or opens the circuit. This causes the motor to stop, and at the same time the solenoids become dei nergized. which allow all parts to return to normal position ready for the next cycle of operation. The operator may then punch the button again or will remove the coin which failed to eject.

It is seen that two means are provided for controllin the circuit breaker switch 98*99. Lpon each-completed operation of the machine and after the coins have been punched therefrom, the arm 102 functions to break the circuit, and this function is not dependent upon any action on the part of the operator; since the independent circuit 131 immediately connects the motor with the electric current main and excludes the key board so that the motor might run until the arm 102 moved down to impinge the lever 101.

The key board is provided with a pluralityof keys variously numbered so as to secure any desired selection of coin punchers to be lifted into upward position. Any one or all of the coin punchers may be lifted by selecting the proper key and depressing it to close the circuit through the electrical elements as described.

The coins are in a horizontal position in the coin trough, and when ejected fall on their edges or rims. They roll down the inclined chute on their rims and finally drop vertically through the chute 5, where delivery is made at 6. This prevents the coins from sticking as they pass through and from the coin chute.

This machine is adapted for use principally in banks, department stores, theaters, and many other institutions where coin must be rapidly handled to make change for customers.

Having thus described my invention, what 1 claim as new. and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

LA coin delivery machine comprising, a coin trough to hold coin, a coin supporting plate fixed to the bottom of the trough with aslot formed therein, a coin ejector head comprising a finger and a guide adapted to move in the slot, a rod attached to the coin ejector head, means for mdving the rod to eject coin from the trough, and means for stopping the movement of the rod in case the coin jams.

2. A coin delivery machine comprising, a rock shaft, a plurality of coin punchers mounted thereon. coin, a gear sector journaled on the rock shaft, an arm fixed to the rock shaft. a resilient connection interposed between the arm and the gear sector, and a motor adapted to run the gear sector to operate the coin punchers.

v 3. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin trough with a discharge slot formed therein, a supporting plate fixed to the trough and having a slot formed therein, a finger slidablc in the slot. a guide made integral with the finger. a puncher aim fixed to the guide, a shaft mounting the puncher arm, arms supporting the shaft, a rock shaft carrying the arms. a gear sector, an I arms supporting the shaft, a rock shaft provided to mount the arms, a gear sector journa-led on the rock shaft, an arm mounted on the rock shaft, a resilient connect-ion formed between the gear sector and the arm, a driving transmission to operate the gear, means employed to engage and disengage the driving transmission from said gear, and means for lifting the finger into the slot of the support plate to engage th rim of a coin to beiejected.

5. A coin delivery machine Comprising, a

device to support stacks of coins, a frame, a

rock shaft journaled in the frame, with a and out of engagement with the gear sector for operating the, coin punchers.

6. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device to support stacks of coins, a frame, a rock shaft journaled in the frame, a plurality of coin punchers operated by the rock shaft, a gear sector cartried by the rock shaft, an arm carried by the shaft, a resilient connection joining the arm and gearsector, a motor and electric circuit, a shaft connected to the motor with auniversal joint, a solenoid adapted to swing the shaft into and out ofengagement with the gear sector for operating the coin punchers, means for stopping the motor by opening the circuit when the coin punchers have ejected coin, and an auxiliary circuit breaker employed to stop the motor when a coin jams in the trough.

7. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device for holding a plurality of stacks of coin, a plurality of coin Y punchers employed to operate against a single coin of each aforesaid stack, a solenoid for each coin puncher with a solenoid plunger to support each coin puncher for raising and lowering said coin puncher in line with the coin,-selective means employed to energize one or more solenoids to lift one or more coin punchers, power means for operating the coin punchers, and means for automatically discontinuing the operation of the power means when the coin becomes jammed.

8. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device for holding a plurality of stacks of coin, a plurality of coin punchers employed to'operate against a single coin of each aforesaid stack, a solenoid for each coin puncher with a solenoid plunger for raising and lowering said coin puncher in line with the coin, selective means employed to energize one or more solenoids to lift one or more coin punchers, a rock shaft carrying the plurality of coin punchers, a gear sector freely journaled on said rock shaft, an arm fixed to the rock shaft, a resilient connection j oining the arm and gear sector together, a drive shaft carried on a universal joint, a worm mounted on the drive shaft to engage the gear sector, a lifting mechanism employed to swing the drive shaft up and down to engage and disengage the worm with the gear sector, and a solenoid employed to operate the lifting mechanism.

9. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device for holding a plurality of stacks of coin, a plurality of coin punchers employed to operate against a single coin of each aforesaid stack, a solenoid for each coin puncher with a plunger for raising and lowering said coin puncher in line with the coin, selective means employed to energize one or more solenoids to lift one or more coin punchers, a rock shaft carrying the plurality. of coin punchers, a gear sector freely j ournaled on the rock shaft, an arm fixed to said shaft, a resilient connection joining the arm and gear sector together, a stop pin fixed on the gear sector, a swinging member carried by the arm' in line with the stop pin, a motor supplied by a circuit main, a circuit breaker in series with the circuit main, and means engageable with the swinging member to open the circuit breaker in case a coin jams.

10. A, coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device to hold a plurality of stacks of coin, a plurality of coin punchers to engage a single coin of each aforesaid stack, an electro selective means associated with each coin puncher to lift it in line with the coin to be engaged, a shaft mounting the plurality of coin punchers, a motor for revolving the shaft, a circuit main to supply the motor with current, a'circuit breaker switch in series with the circuit main, means for opening the circuit breaker switch when the coin punching action has been completed by the coin punchers, and auxiliary means employed for opening the circuit breaker switch in case a coin jams.

11. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin holder means, a coin ejector o ierated relatively with the coin holder, a rock shaft mounting the coin ejector, a gear on the rock shaft, an arm on the shaft, a resilient link connection between the gear and arm, a power shaft for driving the gear, a solenoid disposed beneath the ejector with a plunger in the solenoid to support the ejector, a locking head to clampthe plunger, and means for operating the locking head to clamp the plunger.

12. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin holder means, a coin ejector movable relatively with the coin holder, a shaft mounting the coin ejector, a gear on the shaft, an arm on the shaft, a resilient link connection between the gear and arm, a power shaft for driving the gear, a solenoid disposed beneath the e ector, with a plunger in the solenoid to sup ort the ejector, a locking head to clamp tlie plunger, means for actuating the locking head to clamp the plunger, a circuit main for supplying the motor, and for supplying the solenoid, a circuit opener in the circuit main, and means for opening the circuit opener after the coin puncher operates.

13. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a coin holder means, a coin ejector operated relatively with the coin holder, a shaft mounting the coin ejector, a gear on the shaft, an arm on the shaft, a resilientlink connection between the gear and arm, a power shaft for driving the gear, a solenoid disposed beneath the ejector, with a plunger in the solenoid to support the ejector, a locking head to clamp the plunger, a circuit main for supplying the motor, and for supplying the solenoid, a circuit breaker in the circuit main,,means for opening the circuit breaker when the coin puncher operates, and an auxiliary appliance for opening the circuit breaker if a coin jams.

14. A. coin delivery machine comprising, a coin holder means, a coin ejector operated relatively with the coin holder, a rock shaft mounting the coin ejector, a gear on the rock shaft, an arm on the rock shaft, a resilient link connection between the gear and arm, a power shaft for driving the gear, a solenoid disposed beneath the ejector, a plunger in the solenoid to support the ejector, a locking head to clamp the plunger, a cross shaft, an arm fixed on the cross' shaft to engage the locking head, a lift arm to operate the cross shaft, and a cam on the rock shaft to raise the lift arm.

15. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a coin. trough with slots formed therein, a plurality of coin punchers reciprocatively mounted in the slots, an electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for operating the coin punchers, a current main for supplying the motor, a circuit breaker in the current main, and means for opening the circuit breaker when the machine completes its delivery of coin or when a coin jams.

16. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a coin trough with slots formed therein, a plurality of coin punchers reciprocatively mounted in the slot, an electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for operating the coin punchers, and a resilient connection interposed between the motor and the coin punchers to allow the motor to complete its run in case a coin jams.

17. A coin delivery machine comprising,

in combination, a coin trough with slots formed therein, a plurality of coin punchers reciprocatively mounted in the slots, an. electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for operating the coin punchers, a resilient connection interposed between the motor and the coin punchers to allow the motor to complete its run in, case a coin jams, a circuit for supplying current to the motor, a circuit breaker in the circuit, and means for opening the circuit breaker when the coin is ejected.

18. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a coin trough with slots formed therein, a plurality of coin punchers reciprocatively mounted in the slots, an electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for moving the coin punchers, a resilient connection interposed between the motor and the coin punchers to allow relative movement between the motor and the coin punchers, a circuit for supplying current to the motor, a circuit breaker in the circuit, means for opening the circuit breaker when the operation of the machine is interrupted, a contact means for'simultaneously starting the motor, and for energizing the electro controlled means, and an independent circuit for supplying current to the motor to run said motor in case the contact means is released.

19. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a coin trough with slots formed therein, a plurality of coin punchers slidably mounted in the slots, an electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for operating the coin punchers, a resilient connection interposed between the motor and the coin punchers to allow themotor relative movement with the .coin punchers, a circuit for supplying current to the motor, a circuit breaker in the circuit. means for opening the circuit when the operation of the machine is interrupted, a contact means for simultaneously starting the motor and for energizing the electro controlled means, an independent circuit for supplying current to the motor to run said motor in case the contact means is released, and means employed to open the independent circuit when the machine has operated.

20. A coin delivery machine comprising. in combination, a coin trough with slots formed therein. a plurality of coin punchers slidably mounted in the slots. an electro controlled means for raising and lowering the coin punchers in the slots, a motor for operating the coin punchers a resilient connection interposed between the motor and the coin punchers to allow the motor a movement relatively with the coin punchers, a circuit for supplying current to the motor,

a circuit breaker in the circuit, means for opening the circuit when the operation of the machine is interrupted, a contact means for simultaneously starting the motor and for energizing the electro controlled means, an independent circuit for supplying current to the motor to run said motor in case the contact means is released, means employed to vbreak the independent circuit when the machine has operated, and means for keeping the circuit open as long as the contact means functions.

21. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin trough, a plurality of coin punchers engageable with said trough, a shaft to which is pivotally connected the plurality of coin punchers, support arms carrying the shaft, a rock shaft mounting the support arms, a gear section journaled on the rock shaft, an arm fixed to the rock shaft, means employed to permit relative movement between the arm and the gear sector, a swinging link depending from the arm, an-electric motor supplied from a current main, a drive shaft propelled by the motor, a universal joint fitted in the drive shaft, a driving member fixed on the drive shaft, means for engaging and disengaglng the dr ving member with the gear sector, a circuit breaker switch included in the current main, and means engageable with the swinging link to open the circuit breaker switch in case a coin jams.

22. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin trough, a plurality of coin punchers engageable with the trough, a rock shaft supporting the plurality of coin punchers, an electromagnet employed to lift each coin puncher in engagement with coin to be ejected, a gear sector on the rock shaft, an arm fixed to the rock shaft, a coil spring connecting the arm and gear sector, a motor, and a drive shaft, a gear fixed to the drive shaft to engage with the sector, a current supply main to run the motor, a circuit breaker switch in the current supply main, and a circuit breaker arm fixed to the rock shaft to open the circuit breaker switch.

23. A coin delivery machine comprisinga coin trough, a plurality of coin punchcrs 'engageable with the trough, a rock shaft mounting the plurality of coin punchers, an electromagnet employed to lift each coin puncher in engagement with coin to be ejected, a gear sector on the rock shaft, an arm fixed to the rock shaft, a coil spring connecting the arm and gear sector, a motor, a drive shaft connected with the motor, and a gear fixed to the drive shaft to engage with the sector, a current supply main to run the motor, a circuit breaker switch in-the cur rent supply main, a circuit breaker arm fixed to the rock shaft to open the circuit breaker switch, and auxiliary means for opening the circuit breaker switch in case a coin fails to be e ected.

24:. A coin delivery machine comprising, a

coin trough, coin punchers engageable therewith for ejecting coin, a rock shaft mounting the coin punchers, a solenoid with a plunger positioned underneath each coin puncher to lift said puncher into engagement with the coin trough, a locking head, a shaft, depending arms fixed thereto and engaging the locking heads to press said heads against the plunger, a lift arm fixed to the shaft, a solenoid, a plunger associated with the solenoid and connected with the lift arm adapted to raise said lift arm, a cam engageable with the lift arm, a gear on the rock shaft employed to operate .the coin punchers, and a drive shaft for moving the gear.

25. A coin delivery machine comprising, a

' coin trough, a plurality of coin punchers engageable with said coin troiwli, a solenoid and a plunger positioned underneath each coin puncher adapted to lift said coin puncliers into engagement with the coin trough, an electric motor for operating the coin punchers, a circuit main to supply said motor, said circuit main connecting in parallel. with the plurality of solenoids, a circuit breaker switch included in the circuit main, and means for opening the circuit breaker switch after the motor has completed its cycle of operation.

26. A coin delivery machine comprising. a device to hold a plurality of stacks of coin arranged according to denominational value, said device being provided with guide slots, a plurality of coin ejector heads slidably confined within the guide slots, rods fixed to the ejector heads, means for actuating the rods, a plurality of solenoids arranged beneath the rods, with solenoid plungers provided to support said rods, an electric circuit main connecting with the solenoids, and a key board provided to control the energization of one or more solenoids to lift one or more ejector heads in the aforesaid guide slots.

27. A coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device to hold a plurality of stacks of coin arranged according to denominational value, said device being provided with guide slots, a plurality of coin ejector heads slidably confined within the guide slots, rods fixed to the ejector heads, means fo actuating the rods, a plurality of solenoids arranged beneath the rods. solenoid plungers provided to support said rods, an electric circuit main connecting with the solenoids, a key board provided to control the energization of one or more solenoids to lift one or more ejector heads in the aforesaid guide slots, a circuit breaker switch included in the circuit main, and

mechanical means for opening said circuit switch simultaneously with the coin ejecting action of the ejector heads.

, 28. A coin delivery machine comprising, a device to hold a plurality of stacks of coin arranged according to denominational value,

said device being provided with guide slots, a plurality of coin ejector heads slidably confined within the guide slots, rods fixed to the ejector heads, means for actuating the rods, a plurality of solenoids arranged beneath the rods, solenoid cores provided to support said rods, an electric circuit main connecting with the solenoids, a key board provided to control the energization of one or more solenoids to lift one or more ejector heads in the aforesaid guide slots, a circuit breaker switch included in the circuit main, mechanical means for opening said circuit breaker switch simultaneously with the coin ejecting action of the ejector heads, and an electromagnetic element employed to cooperate with the aforesaid mechanical means to hold said circuit breaker switch open in case the key board functions for a longer time than necessary tooperate the system.

29. A coin delivery machine comprising, a device for holding coins arranged according to denominational value in tiers, a plurality of devices to eject a single coin from each tier, a motor to operate the plurality of devices, a circuit main to supply the motor withcurrent, a key board in series with said circuit main to close said circuit, a relay circuit connected in parallel with the motor and key board to furnish current to said motor in case the key board does not function sufficiently long to operate the motor toeject coin, and a mechanically operated circuit breaker means included in series with said circuit main to open the circuit and hold it open in case the key board functions for a period longer than necessary to complete the coin ejecting movement.

30. A. coin delivery machine comprising, in combination, a device for holding coins arranged according to denominational value in. tiers, a plurality of devices to eject a single coin from each ticr, a motor to operate the plurality of devices, a circuit main to supply current to the motor, a key board in series with the circuit main to close said circuit. a relay circuit connected in parallel with the motor and key board-to furnish current to said motor in case the key board does not function sufiiciently long to run the motor to eject coin, a mechanically operated circuit breaker means included in series with said circuit main, and an electromagnetic device connected in parallel with the key board and with the circuit main for holding the aforesaid mechanically operated circuit breaker means open in case the key board functions for a period longer than necessary to operate the system.

31. A coin delivery machine comprising,

in combination, a coin rack or trough employed to hold several stacks of coins arranged in tiers according to denominational value, with guide slots provided in said coin rack or trough, a coin ejector head slidably confined in each slot, a rod connected to the ejector head, a shaft carrying the rod, a motor employed to move the shaft, an electric circuit main to run the motor, a solenoid associated with each rod and connected with the circuit main, aplunger slidably confined in each solenoidso as to support said rod on top of said plunger to confine each ejector head in its respective guide slot, and a key board connected with the circuit main and consisting of means for selectively energizing one or more solenoids and simultaneously starting the motor.

32. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin rack or trough employed to hold several stacks of coins arranged in tiers according to denominational value, with guide slots provided in said coin rack orxtrough, a coin ejector head slidably confined in each slot, one end of a rod fixed to each ejector head, a

shaft carrying the other end of said rod, 2.

taneously starting the motor, and a solenoid connected in parallel with the circuit main and acting to lock the solenoid plungers.

38. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin rack or trough employed to hold several stacks of coins arranged in tiers according to denominational value, with guide slots provided in said coin rack or trough, a coin ejector head slidably confined in each slot, one end of a rod fixed to each ejector head, a shaft pivot/ally mounting the other end of the rod, a motor employed to move the shaft, an electric circuit main to run the motor, a solenoid connected to the circuit main and associated with each rod, a plunger recip-.

' a coin rack or trough employed tohold several stacks of coins arranged in tiers according to denominational value, with guide slots provided in said coin rack or trough, a coin ejector head slidably confined in each slot, one end of a rod fixed to each ejector head, and a shaft pivotally mounting the other end of the rod, a motor employed to move the shaft, an electric circuit main to run the motor, a solenoid associated with each rod and connected .with the circuit main, a plunger reciprocatively confined in each solenoid so as to support said rod on top of said plunger to confine each ejector head in its respective guide slot, a key board connected with the circuit main and consisting of means for selectively energizing one or more solenoids and simultaneously starting the motor, .a mechanical circuit breaker means included in the electrical current main for opening aforesaid current main to stop aforesaid motor when the coin unchin o eration has been com )leted. b I

and an electromagnetic element employed to hold the mechanical circuit breaker means open in case the key board continues to hold the circuit main closed. a

35. A coin delivery machine comprising, a coin rack or trough employed to hold several stacks of coins arranged in tiers accordingto denominational value, with guide slots provided in said coin rack or trough, a coin ejector head slidably confined in each slot, one end of a rod fixed to each ejector head, a shaft mounting the other end of this rod, a motor employed to move the shaft, an electric circuit main to run the motor. a solenoid employed for each rod and connected with the circuit main, a plunger reciprocatively confined in each solenoid so as to support said rod on top of said plunger to confine each ejector head in its re spective guide slot, a key board connected with the circuit main and consisting of means for selectively energizing one'o'r more solenoids and simultaneously starting the motor, a mechanical circuit breaker means included in the electrical current main for opening the aforesaid current main to stop the aforesaid motor when the coin punching operation has been completed, an electromagnetic element employed to hold the mechanical circuit breaker means open in case the key board continues to hold the circuit main closed, and a relay circuit employed to furnish current to the motor in case the key board fails to close the circuit main for a period suiliciently long to allow the motor to complete its period of operation.

36. A coin delivery machine comprising,

a means employed to hold stacks of coin, a

device employed to eject coin therefrom, said device carried upon a rock shaft, a gear mounted on the rock shaft, an arm mounted on the shaft, a resilient link connection beshaft fitted with a universal joint at one end thereof, a lifting mechanism associated with the other end of said drive shaft, :1 motor for revolving aforesaid drive shaft, and a solenoid employed to control the lifting mechanism to engage the drive shaft with the gear when the motor starts.

37. A coin delivery mechanism of the type comprising a coin-holding device, a coinejecting mechanism, and a motor for driving the mechanism, characterized by having an automatic cut-out apparatus for stopping the motor in case coins in the mechanism become jammed.

38. A coin delivery mechanism comprising a coin holder, a coin ejector, a power shaft operatively connected to said ejector, an electric motor connected to said shaft, having a supply circuit, a circuit breaker in said supply circuit, means connected'with said shaft to open said circuit at a predetermined point in the movement of said shaft, resilient means for permitting the movement of said motor when the movement If the ejector is obstructed, andmeans operated by said resilient means to operate the 9 circuit breaker when the movement of the ejector is obstructed.

I 39. A coin delivery mechanism comprising a reciprocating element, a motor for driving said element, a resilient connection therebetween, a motor circuit, a circuit breaker in said circuit, means connected to said motor to operate the circuit breaker at a predetermined point in the movement of said motor, and means associated with said resilient means to operate the circuit breaker when the movement of the reciprocating element is obstructed.

40. A coin delivery mechanism comprising a coin holder, a coin ejector having inoperative and operative positions, electromagnetic means for moving said ejector to its operative position, mechanical means for retaining said ejector in its operative position, and means for causing the actuation of the first-mentioned means before the actuation of the second-mentioned means.

41. A coin delivery machine comprising a coin holder having a slot in its bottom, a coin ejector adapted to move in the slot, means to actuate said ejector, and means for stopping the movement of the actuating means when the movement of the ejector is obstructed.

42. A coin delivery machine comprising a rock shaft, a plurality of coin ejectors mounted thereon, a gear sector journaled on said shaft, an arm fixed to the shaft, a resilient connection between the arm and the sector, and a motor adapted to actuate the sector.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2500437 *10 Jan 194514 Mar 1950Vendomatic Machine CorpDispenser
US2605774 *3 Sep 19465 Aug 1952Johnson Fare Box CompanyTen key coin issuing device
US2693299 *30 Dec 19482 Nov 1954Arthur R GrossDispensing machine
US2754950 *9 Oct 194817 Jul 1956Harris Charles FCheck controlled liquid dispenser
US2805675 *12 Jun 195010 Sep 1957Noyes And FiesCurrency dispensing system
US2864385 *23 Dec 195416 Dec 1958Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin dispensing machine
US2910991 *16 May 19573 Nov 1959Cummins Chicago CorpCoin dispensing apparatus
US2922427 *14 Nov 195526 Jan 1960Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin dispensing machine
US2972442 *12 Jul 195421 Feb 1961The National Cash Register CompanyAutomatic change dispensing cash
US2976874 *30 Oct 195728 Mar 1961Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin changer apparatus
US2988093 *13 May 195913 Jun 1961Brandt Automatic Cashier CoRemote control for coin dispensing machine
US3020916 *16 Dec 195813 Feb 1962Brandt Automatic Cashier CoElectrically controlled coin dispensing machine
US3080035 *29 Jan 19595 Mar 1963Automatic Canteen CoChange-making machine
US3131702 *27 Dec 19605 May 1964Brandt Automatic Cashier CoCoin dispensing machine
US3180343 *22 May 196127 Apr 1965Reed Electromech CorpCoin dispensing device
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US6837783 *3 May 20024 Jan 2005Mars IncorporatedCoin stores and coin dispensers
US768170713 Apr 200723 Mar 2010Tabachnik Bruce MDrawerless point of sale system and associated methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/41, 235/7.00A, 453/50
International ClassificationG07D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D1/00
European ClassificationG07D1/00