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Publication numberCA1224867 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberCA 469663
Publication date28 Jul 1987
Filing date7 Dec 1984
Priority date16 Jan 1984
Also published asCA1224867A1, US4609994
Publication numberCA 1224867 A, CA 1224867A, CA 469663, CA-A-1224867, CA1224867 A, CA1224867A
InventorsM. Nabil Bassim, Kris Tangri
ApplicantM. Nabil Bassim, Kris Tangri, University Of Manitoba (The)
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: CIPO, Espacenet
Apparatus for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emission
CA 1224867 A
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Provided is apparatus suitable for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emissions, particularly from large structures such as pipelines. The apparatus comprises a plurality of detector-analyzer units coupled to a central control unit via a communications link. Each detector-analyzer unit comprises an acoustic detector, signal processing means, and a microprocessor. Preferably, the signal processing means comprises at least one signal conditioner, and at least one measuring circuit which provides digital output signals representing a set of emission parameters. The microprocessor preferably periodically receives and compares the digital output signal representing each of the emission parameters with the base values thereof, and provides a warning signal if a problem situation is perceived as a result of such comparison.
Claims(34)
THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN
EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS
FOLLOWS:
1. Apparatus suitable for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emissions, comprising:
(a) a plurality of detector-analyzer units, each in a discrete pre-selected location, each detector-analyzer unit including:
(i) an acoustic detector for detecting acoustic emission and providing an output signal representative of the acoustic emission;
(ii) at least one signal conditioner coupled to the detector and receiving the output signal thereof and providing at least one derivative signal having characteristics correlatable with preselected characteristics of the output signal of the detector;
(iii) at least one measuring circuit coupled to the signal conditioner and receiving each such derivative signal, and providing for each such derivative signal a digital output signal representing one of a set of emission parameters, correlatable with said pre-selected characteristics of the output signal of the detector; and (iv) a microprocessor coupled to each such measuring circuit and storing a set of base values and receiving and storing a digital output signal representing the set of emission parameters, said - Page 1 of Claims -microprocessor periodically comparing members of the set of base values with corresponding members of the set of emission parameters to determine the existence of a problem situation, and providing a warning signal if any such problem situation is perceived;
(b) a central control unit remote from and coupled to each of said detector-analyzer units and receiving any warning signals transmitted by the communication means; and (c) communications means coupled between the detector-analyzer unit and the central control unit for transmission of the warning signal to the central control unit.
2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit also includes means for controlling the operation of the at least one measuring circuit.
3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2, wherein the microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit also includes means for controlling the operation of the at least one signal conditioner.
4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit also includes means for providing a message when a problem situation is determined, said message including a signal identifying the - Page 2 of Claims -respective detector-analyzer unit which generated the warning signal, and the central control unit includes means for receiving such message via the communications means.
5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4, wherein said message additionally includes a signal representing current values of the emission parameters at the time the warning signal was generated.
6. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit includes means for characterizing particular problem situations, comprising means for storing a set of problem situation identifiers correlatable with a determination that one or more emission parameters have exceeded their base values, means for making such a determination, and means for providing a signal receivable by the central control unit via the communications means representing the appropriate problem situation identifiers.
7. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the communications means is a two-way communications link.
8. Apparatus as defined in claim 7, wherein the central control unit includes means for programming the detector-analyzer units with a given set of base values via the communications link.

- Page 3 of Claims -
9. Apparatus as defined in claim 8, wherein the central control unit includes means for independently programming each unit with a discrete set of base values.
10. Apparatus as defined in claim 7, wherein the central control unit includes means for programming and re-programming each detector-analyzer unit with its master program by means of the communications link.
11. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit provides a warning signal if one or more members of the set of emission parameters exceed the respective base values thereof.
12. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one measuring circuit comprises a total count counter circuit, a count rate counter circuit, and an r.m.s. volt meter circuit, and wherein the set of emission parameters comprises total counts, count rate and r.m.s. voltage.
13. Apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein the microprocessor includes real time clock means for controlling the operation of the total count counter circuit, count rate counter circuit, and r.m.s. volt meter circuit.
14. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein one of the signal conditioners comprises a comparator circuit for - Page 4 of Claims -generating a pulse train suitable for input into at least one of the measuring circuits.
15. Apparatus as defined in claim 12, wherein one of the signal conditioners comprises a comparator circuit for generating a pulse train suitable for input into the count rate counter circuit and the total count counter circuit, respectively.
16. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the microprocessor includes threshold adjustment means for characterizing the output signal from the at least one measuring circuit as being either an acoustic emission signal or background noise, based upon whether the output signal exceeds an average noise value determined from a sampling of earlier received output signals from the at least one measuring circuit.
17. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the acoustic detector is a piezoelectric transducer.
18. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the acoustic detector is an accelerometer.
19. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the at least signal conditioner comprises at least one frequency filter and at least one signal amplifier.

- Page 5 of Claims -
20. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein each of the detector-analyzer units further comprises self-diagnostic means for injecting a test pulse at pre-selected intervals into the signal conditioner, for comparing the response thereto with a known response, and for transmitting a warning signal to the central control unit if the comparison reveals a malfunction of the detector-analyzer unit.
21. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the control unit further comprises means for periodically receiving from each detector-analyzer unit and storing for use the current values of one or more of the set of emission parameters in order to monitor the background acoustic emissions when a problem situation is not occurring.
22. A detector-analyzer unit, for use with a remote central control unit, the combination thereof being suitable for continuous monitoring of acoustic emissions, the said detector-analyzer unit comprising:
(i) an acoustic detector for detecting acoustic emission and providing an output signal representative of the acoustic emission;
(ii) at least one signal conditioner coupled to the detector and receiving the output signal thereof and providing at least one derivative signal having characteristics correlatable with preselected characteristics of the output signal of the detector;

- Page 6 of Claims -(iii) at least one measuring circuit coupled to the signal conditioner and receiving each such derivative signal, and providing for each such derivative signal a digital output signal representing one of a set of emission parameters, correlatable with said pre-selected characteristics of the output signal of the detector; and (iv) a microprocessor coupled to each such measuring circuit and storing a set of base values and receiving and storing a digital output signal representing the set of emission parameters, said microprocessor periodically comparing members of the set of base values with corresponding members of the set of emission parameters to determine the existence of a problem situation, and providing a warning signal if any such problem situation is perceived.
23. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the microprocessor further comprises means for controlling the function of the at least one measuring circuit.
24. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the microprocessor further comprises means for providing a message in addition to the warning signal when a problem situation is perceived, said message including a signal identifying the said microprocessor.

- Page 7 of Claims -
25. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the at least one measuring circuit comprises a total count counter circuit, a count rate counter circuit, and an r.m.s. voltmeter circuit, and wherein the set of emission parameters comprises total counts, count rate and r.m.s.
voltage.
26. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the microprocessor includes means for characterizing particular problem situations, comprising means for storing a set of problem situation identifiers correlatable with a determination that one or more emission parameters have exceeded their base values, means for making such a determination, and means for providing a signal receivable by the central control unit via the communication means representing the appropriate problem situation identifiers.
27. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 25, wherein the microprocessor includes real time clock means for controlling the operation of the total count counter circuit, count rate counter circuit, and r.m.s. volt meter circuit.
28. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein one of the signal conditioners comprises a comparator circuit for generating a pulse train suitable for input into at least one of the measuring circuits.

- Page 8 of Claims -
29. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the microprocessor includes threshold adjustment means for characterizing the output signal from the at least one measuring circuit as being either an acoustic emission signal or background noise, based upon whether the output signal exceeds an average noise value determined from a sampling of earlier received output signals from the at least one measuring circuit.
30. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, further comprising self-diagnostic means for injecting a test pulse at pre-selected intervals into the signal conditioner, for comparing the response thereto with a known response, and for transmitting a warning signal to the remote central control unit if the comparison reveals a malfunction of the detector-analyzer unit.
31. The detector-analyzer unit as defined in claim 22, wherein the microprocessor provides a warning signal if one or more members of the set of emission parameters exceed the respective base values thereof.
32. Apparatus suitable for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emissions, comprising:
(a) a plurality of detector-analyzer units, each in a discrete pre-selected location, each detector-analyzer unit including:

- Page 9 of Claims -(i) an acoustic detector for detecting acoustic emission and providing an output signal representative of the acoustic emission;
(ii) at least one signal conditioner coupled to the detector and receiving the output signal thereof and providing at least one derivative signal having characteristics correlatable with preselected characteristics of the output signal of the detector;
(iii) at least one digitizing circuit coupled to the signal conditioner and receiving each such derivative signal, and providing for each such derivative signal a digital output signal correlatable with said pre-selected characteristics of the output signal of the detector; and (iv) a microprocessor coupled to each such digitizing circuit and receiving the output signal thereof, including means for periodically determining a current value of each of a set of emission parameters from the digital output signal, means for storing a set of base values for each of the set of emission parameters, means for periodically comparing the current value of each of the set of emission parameters with the base value thereof to determine the existence of a problem situation, and means for providing a warning signal if the current value of any of the set of emission parameter exceeds the base value thereof;

- Page 10 of Claims -(b) a central control unit remote from and coupled to each of said detector-analyzer units and receiving any warning signals transmitted by the communication means; and (c) communications means coupled between the detector-analyzer unit and the central control unit for transmission of the warning signal to the central control unit.
33. Apparatus suitable for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emissions, comprising:
(a) a plurality of detector-analyzer units, each in a discrete pre-selected location, each detector-analyzer unit including:
(i) an acoustic detector for detecting acoustic emission and providing an output signal representative of the acoustic emission;
(ii) signal processing means coupled to the detector and receiving the output signal thereof and providing at least one derivative digitized output signal having characteristics correlatable with preselected characteristics of the output signal of the detector; and (iii) a microprocessor coupled to the signal processing means and receiving the output signal thereof, including means for determining a current value of each of a set of emission parameters from the digital output signal, means for storing a set of base values for each of the set of emission - Page 11 of Claims -parameters, means for periodically comparing the current value of each of the set of emission parameters with the base value thereof to determine the existence of a problem situation, and means for providing a warning signal if the current value of any of the set of emission parameter exceeds the base value thereof;
(b) a central control unit remote from and coupled to each of said detector-analyzer units and receiving any warning signals transmitted by the communication means; and (c) communications means coupled between the detector-analyzer unit and the central control unit for transmission of the warning signal to the central control unit.
34. A detector-analyzer unit, for use with a remote central control unit, the combination thereof being suitable for continuous monitoring of acoustic emissions, the said detector-analyzer unit comprising:
(i) an acoustic detector for detecting acoustic emission and providing an output signal representative of the acoustic emission;
(ii) signal processing means coupled to the detector and receiving the output signal thereof and providing at least one derivative digitized output signal having characteristics correlatable with preselected characteristics of the output signal of the detector; and - Page 12 of Claims -(iii) a microprocessor coupled to the signal processing means and receiving the output signal thereof, including means for determining a current value of each of a set of emission parameters from the digital output signal, means for storing a set of base values for each of the set of emission parameters, means for periodically comparing the current value of each of the set of emission parameters with the base value thereof to determine the existence of a problem situation, and means for providing a warning signal if the current value of any of the set of emission parameter exceeds the base value thereof.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

~2Z4867 Field of the Invention This invention relates to apparatus suitable for continuous monitoring of acoustic emission, and more particularly, to apparatus suitable for continuous, on-line, long-term monitoring of acoustic emission from large structures, such as pipelines, to detect incipient failure thereof.

Background of the Invention Various methods of non-destructive testing and/or monitoring of structures are known. One such method is acoustic emission testing, which detects acoustic emissions (i.e. stress waves) generated in a material when discontinuity growth occurs in same. Discontinuity growth results from fatigue, plastic deformation, cracking, brittle fracture, corrosion pitting and the like. The acoustic emissions or stress waves which are of interest for non-destructive testing purposes take the form of low amplitude pulses, in the 0.1 to 2 MHz frequency range.
Acoustic emission testing is a useful means of detecting impending or incipient failure of a structure, since such testing can detect discontinuity growth before it is visible.
Acoustic emission equipment can also detect the existence of leaks, in the case of structures containing gases or fluids.
Conventional acoustic emission testing equipment generally consists of one or more piezoelectric transducers which are attached to the surface of the structure being

- 2 - ~C

tested and which are coupled to a data analysis unit of one or more channels. The output of each transducer is typically amplified, conditioned (such as by filtering) and then analyzed by the data analysis unit. Typical parameters generated by the analysis unit include emission counts, count rate, amplitude and energy. These parameters are generally displayed as a function of time on either a hard copy recorder or a video display terminal, and are reviewed and interpreted by a trained operator, to determine the existence and nature of any discontinuities or leaks.
Most acoustic emission testing systems require that a source of stress, such as hydrostatic pressure, be applied thereto, in order to determine the existence of discontinuity growth. This type of equipment, which is geared to periodic and proof testing of structures, is limited, since it cannot provide any monitoring of the structure during operating conditions, i.e. it cannot provide on-line monitoring capability.
Some acoustic emission testing equipment is said to be capable of providing limited on-line monitoring to detect certain discontinuities, for some applications. For instance, ~.S. Patent No. 4,380,172, which issued to Imam et al on 19 April 1983, discloses a method for detecting incipient cracks in the rotor of a fluid powered turbine; and .S. Patent No. 4,317,368, which issued to McElroy on 2 March 1982, discloses an apparatus which detects acoustic emissions produced in a fihreglass boom by breakage of glass fibres.

However, these and other known acoustic e~ission testing or monitoring systems are not well adapted to economically analyze the output of more than only a few acoustic emission detectors, since multichannel analyzers of more than only a few channels are expensive. Most of these systems are also very expensive to operate continuously for more than a few hours of time, since generally a highly trained scientist or technician must be continuously present to interpret the output of the analyzer and make decisions based thereon. In particular, it has been found that conventional acoustic emission monitoring equipment is incapable of economically monitoring a large structure such as a pipeline extending for several kilometers under operating conditions on a continuous, long-term basis (i.e. 24 hours a day for days or weeks), in view of the large number of detectors required (several hundred for some cases), and in view of the overwhelming amount of data which is generated therefrom and which must be analyzed and interpreted, in order to obtain meaningful results.

Summary of the Invention It has been found that economical, long-term, on-line surveillance of the integrity of large structures can be achieved by means of an acoustic emission monitoring system having a plurality of detector-analyzer units coupled to a central control unit.

l.ZZ4867 Accordingly, the present invention provides apparatus suitable for continuous long-term monitoring of acoustic emissions, comprising a plurality of detector-analyzer units, ea~h in a discrete pre-selected location, and a central control unit remote from and coupled to each of the detector-analyzer units. Each detector-analyzer unit includes an acoustic detector, at least one signal conditioner (which may include one or more amplifiers, filters, and comparators) at least one measuring circuit, and a microprocessor. The acoustic detector detects acoustic emission and provides an output signal representative of the acoustic emission. The signal conditioner is coupled to the detector and receives the output signal therefrom. The signal conditioner provides at least one derivative signal having characteristics correlatable with pre-selected characteristics of the output signal of the detector. (For example, the derivative signal may be frequency selective.) The measuring circuit is coupled to the signal conditioner and receives each derivative signal. The measuring circuit provides for each derivative signal a digital output signal representing one of a set of emission parameters correlatable with said pre-selected characteristics of the output signal of the detector. The microprocessor is coupled to each measuring circuit. It stores a set of base values and also receives and stores the digital output signals representing the set of emission parameters. The microprocessor periodically compares members of the set of base values with corresponding members of the set of emission parameters to determine the existence of a problem situation, and provides a warning signal if any such problem situation is perceived. Suitable communication means are coupled to the microprocessor and remotely to the central control unit for transmission of the warning signal and optionally other data to the central control unit. The central control unit receives any warning signals transmitted by the communication means, and may act as a coordination centre for coordinating and directing a suitable response.
The microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit preferably includes means for characterizing particular problem situations, and means for controlling the operation of the measuring circuits and signal conditioners. The microprocessor also preferably includes means for providing a message at the time the warning signal is generated, such message including a signal identifying the unit generating the warning signal, a signal representing the set of emission parameters which triggered the warning, and a signal representing the characterization of the problem situation.
The measuring circuit of each detector-analyzer may comprise a total count counter circuit, a count rate counter circuit, and a r.m.s. volt meter circuit. The microprocessor may include a threshold adjustment means, which characterizes incoming data signals as either acoustic emission signals or background noise, based upon whether such signals exceed the ~224867 current value of a threshold based upon a sampling of previously received data signals. The central control unit preferahly includes means for programming and re-programming each detector-analyzer unit with its master program and its set of base values.
The present invention is also directed to a detector-analyzer unit as described above for use with a remote central control unit, the combination thereof being suitable for continuous monitoring of acoustic emission.
According to another aspect of the invention, there is provided a detector-analyzer unit comprising an acoustic detector, signal processing means coupled thereto which provides a digitized output signal, and a microprocessor.
The microprocessor includes means for periodically determining a current value of each of a set of emission parameters, means for storing base values for each parameter, means for periodically comparing each current value of the parameter with its base value thereof, and means for providing a warning signal. The invention is also directed to apparatus comprising a plurality of detectors as just described coupled to a central control unit via a communications link.
The invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the following drawings, in which like numerals refer to like parts, and in which:

lZ24867 Figure 1 is a block diagram illustrating the monitoring apparatus of the present invention shown in conjunction with a pipeline; and Figure 2 is a block diagram of the preferred embodiment of a detector-analyzer unit made in accordance with the present invention.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment Figure 1 illustrates the principal components of the monitoring apparatus of the present invention, which comprises a plurality of detector-analyzer units 10 coupled to a central control unit 11, by communications means link 12. Detector-analyzers 10 are shown attached to the surface of pipeline 13, but it is to he understood that the monitoring apparatus of the present invention is also suitable for the surveillance of other structures, particularly large structures, such as nuclear reactors and off-shore drilling platforms, which require continuous surveillance at a large number of discrete locations for long periods of time.
Each detector-analyzer unit 10 is microprocessor controlled and is capable of analyzing the acoustic emissions or stress waves received thereby, by generating a set of emission parameters and by comparing members of this set of parameters with corresponding members of a set of base values for these parameters stored in the memory of the detector-analyzer unit. If this comparison indicates that one or more of the emission parameters exceed the respective base values thereof, a warning signal is generated by the detector-analyzer unit. This warning signal is transmitted to the central control unit 11 by communications means 12.
At the same time a further message may be transmitted by the detector-analyzer unit to the control unit which identifies the detector-analyzer unit generating the warning signal and which indicates the current values of the emission parameters (i.e. the values of the parameters at the instant the warning signal was generated).
Each detector-analyzer unit may also be capable of characterizing the type of problem situation, which may be discontinuity growth in the material of the structure, or a leak therefrom of the gas or fluid contained in the structure. The characterization of the problem situation is based upon a known correlation between the response of each of the emission parameters to known problem situations. For example, it is known that cracking tends to increase the count rate parameter, whereas a gas leak tends to increase the r.m.s. voltage parameter. Other problem situations, such as plastic deformation, brittle fracture and fatigue, can be similarly identified. The microprocessor of each detector-analyzer unit can be programmed, hased upon the expertise of an experienced interpreter of acoustic emission data, to identify with a reasonable degree of certainty the probable problem situation, depending upon which parameter or combination of parameters have exceeded their base values.

~224867 This automatic characterization ability of the detector-analyzer unit avoids the need to employ highly trained technicians or scientists to continuously interpret the output of the monitoring apparatus. A signal repre~senting this characterization or identification of a particular problem situation may be transmitted to the central control unit along with the other data discussed above.
The central control unit 11 has the capability of further analyzing, if desired, the information received by each detector-analyzer unit 10. For instance, the central control unit may be programmed to correlate the responses of individual detector-analyzer units, to approximate the location of a discontinuity occurring between adjacent detector-analyzer units.
The apparatus of the present invention therefore provides a two-step method of analysis, with the bulk of the analysis heing performed by each detector-analyzer unit.
Having most of the analysis performed by each detector-analyzer unit avoids the need for a sophisticated and expensive multi-channel analysis unit. Also avoided is the need to transmit data in analogue form, such data being prone to attenuation over long distances. The difficulties involved in the digitization of raw data in the high kilohertz or megahertz range are also avoided.
The monitoring apparatus of the present invention is particularly suitable for monitoring pipelines of many ~2Z4867 kilometers long every few hundred meters, such monitoring requiring several hundred individual detectors. No conventional acoustic emission multi-channel analysis system is capable of providing such surveillance in a cost-effective manner, particularly in the case of long-term (days as opposed to minutes), continuous, on-line monitoring.
The central control unit, in addition to including means for receiving messages from the detector-analyzer units, also includes means for programming and re-programming each detector-analyzer unit with its master program and with its set of base values and with its set of measurement variables to be discussed below. The capacity of the central control unit to program the detector-analyzer units is convenient, since the detector-analyzer units will generally be placed in remote, wide-spaced and often inaccessible areas, such as adjacent an underground pipeline. The central control unit 11 is further capable of individually programming each detector-analyzer unit with its own master program and discrete set of base values and measurement variables, if desired. This capability makes the monitoring apparatus of the present invention very flexible and adaptable to various applications.
The central control unit 11 also includes means for testing and monitoring each detector-analyzer unit. More specifically, the central control unit includes means for triggering the self-diagnostic circuit of a given detector-analyzer unit, which is explained below. The ~2Z4867 central control unit also includes means for receiving and displaying the current set of emission parameters generated by a given detector-analyzer unit at any time.
Referring now to Figure 2, each detector-analyzer unit 10 comprises an acoustic detector 14, a signal conditioner 15, measuring circuits 16, 17 and 18, and microprocessor 19. Each unit 10 is connected to central control unit 11 by means of communication means 12.
Detector 14 detects acoustic emissions generated by a material under stress, and provides an output signal representative of such acoustic emissions, in the sense that its output voltage is proportional to the displacements in the material caused by stress. Detector 14 may be a commercially available acoustic emission piezoelectric transducer or an accelerometer.
Signal conditioner 15 may comprise preamplifier 22, filters 23, logarithmic amplifier 24, secondary amplifier 25, and comparator circuit 21. As such, signal conditioner 15 provides two derivative signals having characteristics correlatable with certain characteristics of the output signal of detector 14. These signals are the output signal of comparator circuit 21 and the output signal of secondary amplifier 25. The latter signal is an amplified and frequency-filtered version of the output of detector 14. The output signal of the comparator is described below.
Preamplifier 22 may be an N-channel Field Effect Transistor (F.E.T.) low noise amplifier having a 40 dh gain.

~2Z4867 An F.E.T. is preferred because of its high input impedence and low noise characteristics. The filters 23 are frequency filters passing only those frequencies relevant for analysis.
Filters 23 may be four-pole butterworth active, unity g~in filters. A low pass and high pass filter may be cascaded to provide a band-pass filter with adjustahle lower and upper limits, having a roll-off of 80 db-decade at both lower and upper cut-offs. The preferred transmitted frequency range is 100 KHz-25n K~z, when detector 14 is a transducer, and 1000 Hz-20 KHz, when detector 14 is an accelerometer.
Logarithmic amplifier 24 enables the monitoring apparatus to analyze very weak as well as very strong signals from the transducer. The logarithmic amplifier may be such that signals ranging from about 300 microvolts to 3 volts are transformed into signals ranging from about 0 volts to 0.5 volts. The secondary amplifier 25 may be a low noise operational amplifier having a 20 db gain stage to amplify the signal to an acceptable level for input into the measuring circuit 18.
Comparator circuit 21 may comprise comparator 26 having two inputs, one connected to the output of logarithmic amplifier 24 and the second connected to a voltage threshold means 34, which may be a variahle resistor. The value of threshold means 34 is adjusted, preferably by a control signal from microprocessor 19, to be just above the noise level of the logarithmic amplifier 24. Comparator 26 is turned on when the input signal from logarithmic amplifier 24 l.ZZ4867 rises ahove this threshold. The comparator 26 in turn switches off when the input voltage falls below this threshold. This action results in a pulse train suitable for input into measuring circuits 16 and 17.
Measuring circuits 16-18 each receive a derivative signal from signal conditioner 15, and each provides a digital output signal representing an emission parameter, such signal being correlatable with the output signal of detector 14, and ultimately, to the acoustic emissions 1~ generated in the material. Measuring circuits 16 and 17 receive their input signals from comparator 26, while measuring circuit 18 receives its input signal from secondary amplifier 25.
~ easuring circuit 16 may be a total count counter circuit, which accumulates the total number of pulses received from comparator 26 over an interval of time of up to 24 hours. This total time interval may be adjusted by means of a control signal Erom microprocessor 19. The total count counter circuit may comprise an 8 digit decade counter. When the eighth counter overflows, a service routine of microprocessor 19 may be called which can account for up to 99 overflows, the re~sult being a ln digit decade counter.
Measuring circuit 17 may be a count rate counter which determines the rate at which total count counter circuit 16 receives the counts. The timing interval of the count rate counter may range from 1 second to 1 hour. The count rate counter may be a 4 digit decade counter. When the ~224867 fourth ~ecade overflow~s, it may call for a service routine of microprocessor 19 which can account for up to 99 overflows.
The result is a 6 digit counter. The count rate counter output is stored in microprocessor 19 and then the counter is reset.
The output of measuring circuits 16 and 17 is received hy microprocessor 19, which in turn subjects such output to an automatic threshold adjustment subroutine, to either accept the output as an acoustic emission signal, or reject the output as background noise. The suhroutine samples a number of previously received data points, determines an average value for such points, and automatically adjusts the threshold upwardly or downwardly in accordance therewith. Only output signals having a value greater than the current value of the background noise threshold are considered and stored by microprocessor 19 as being acoustic emission counts.
Measuring circuit 18 may comprise r.m.s.
detector 27 and analogue-to-digital (A to D) converter 28.
2n Detector 27 provides a d.c. output equal to the true r.m.s.
level of the input signal. The output of detector 27 is fed into A to D converter 28 which may be an 8 bit analogue-to-digital converter where the binary number nonooooo represents 0 and the binary number 11111111 represents 5.12 volts, each hinary increase representing an increment of 20 mv. This output is then fed into microprocessor 19, which divides such input by the net amplifier ga;n to give the true r.m.s. value of the acoustic emission signal. Microprocessor 19 provides control signals to A to D converter 28 in order to control the sampling rate of A to D converter 28 and to synchronize A to D converter 28 with microprocessor 19.
It is to he realized that various other measuring circuits than those described above may be used to analyze acoustic emissions, by obtaining emission signal parameters such as energy event duration, amplitude distribution and frequency content. However, it has been found that the particular selection of parameters generated by the preferred embodiment of thls invention provides an excellent basis for accurately detecting and identifyiny a wide range of problem situations for many applications. It should also be clear that signal conditioner 15 is not limited to the specific circuitry described.
Microprocessor 19 comprises central processing unit (CPU) 29, storage means 30, data input means 31, real time clock 32, communications interface 33 and associated 2n operating system software, master program, and inputted base values of parameters and other data. The central processing unit 29 may be a ~-80 microprocessor based hoard of 8 bit capacity capahle of addressing 64 K of random access memory (RAM) and read only memory (ROM). The CPU board may operate on a S-100 bus system. The storage means 30 may comprise RAM
and ROM. The ROM may be a 2708 EPROM (Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory). The RAM may be a 32 K-byte board, l.ZZ4867 a]though only one or two ~-bytes of RAM is necessary as data storage if the master program resides in ROM. In RAM, there may exist a scratch pad consisting of 15 lines of 16 bytes each.
Real time clock 32 is generated by dividing down the two MHz clock of CPU 29 by two million so as to obtain a 1 Hz square wave. This wave triggers a non-maskable interrupt which in turn calls a clock subroutine of the master program, which updates the hours, minutes and seconds once every second. Simultaneously, two other subroutines of the master program are called, which increment the timing intervals for the count rate counter and the total count counter.
Detector-analyzer units 10 are relatively compact.
Their spacing depends upon the attenuation properties and the geometry of the structure being monitored. In the case of a pipeline, it may he possihle to space each detector-analyzer unit several hundred meters or more apart, depending upon the sensitivity of the detector. The units may be placed in critical areas of the structure if desired.
Communications means 12 may be a two-way communications link consisting of two VAR-T (Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter) chips. The transmission medium may be a hard wired configuration, having 9600 bps baud rate in both receive and transmit modes. Alternatively, communications means 12 may comprise radio frequency or 122486~
microwave hroadcasting means, or telephone lines and associated interfaces.
Central control unit 11 may comprise a central processing unit, an input-output unit, a storage medium, and associated operating system software and applications software. Control unit 11 includes means for receiving warning signals from the detector-analyzer units 10, which may be a warning light or audihle alarm activated by the warning signal. The control unit 11 may be a 64 K-byte, Z-80 based microcomputer operating at 4 MHz equipped with two Shugart disc drives, one for program storage and one for data storage. Central control unit 11 may also comprise a printer and video terminal. Messages received from the detector-analyzer unit 10 may be stored on the data storage disc, or displayed on the video terminal, or printed on paper. The input-output unit, which may comprise a keyboard, is also useA to program and communicate with the detector-analyzer units 10, via communications link 12.
In a preferred mode of operation, the central control unit 11, upon power up, addresses each detector-analyzer unit 10 sequentially. As each detector-analyzer unit is addressed, a request is made that it be programmed with its master program. This program includes the emission parameter and base value comparison subroutine, warning signal and message generating subroutines, problem situation characterization subroutine, threshold adjustment subroutine, real time clock suhroutine, lZZ4867 timer interval subroutines, and other control function subroutines. ~ample listings of four of the subroutines of the master program are found in Appendix A. It is to be understood, however, that many variations of these subroutines may be made without departing from the scope of this invention.
Once the master program is transmitted to the detector-analyzer unit, the unit transmits a message to the control unit 11 requesting that 7 variahles be entered as follows:
1. time, 2. date,

3. count rate interval,

4. total count interval,

5. r.m.s. base value,

6. count rate base value,

7. total count base value.
Items 3 and 4 represent measurement variables and items 5-7 represent the ba~se values of the emission parameters. This same exercise is carried out in respect of all detector-analyzel~ units, at which time the system is capable of performing its monitoring tasks.
The monitoring operations of each detector-analyzer unit may be described as follows. As each current parameter value is determined at the end of its respective timing interval (the r.m.s. detector also having a timing interval), it is compared with its respective base value. If the lZ24867 current value of the parameter is less than its respective base value, then the time, date, timing interval and current value of the parameter are memorized on line 1 in the appropriate section of the scratch pad. If the next determined current value is still less than the base value, the new time, date, timing interval and current value are rewritten on line 1. This process continues as long as the current value is less than the respective base value.
However, if it is determined that the current value is equal to or greater than the base value, then the above data (time, date, timing interval and current value) is written first on line 1, then sequentially on lines 2 through 5. If the current parameter value should be determined to be less than its base value before line 5 is written, the entire data block is reset and the current data rewritten on line 1.
Otherwise, as soon as line 5 is completed, the microprocessor recognizes a problem situation, the problem situation is characterized, and a warning signal is generated. A message containing a characterization of the problem situation, the surveillance unit number, the hase value, and the pertinent data hlock consisting of the time, date, timing interval and current value, are transferred to an output buffer, for communication to the central control unit.
The requirement for 5 consecutive determinations that the current value exceeds the base value is made to reduce the probability of mis-identifying background noise as a problem situation. However, the number of consecutive ~ZZ4867 occurrences required for identification of a problem situation can be reduced or otherwise changed. It can also he set independently for each emission parameter.
The nase values of the parameters may be ohtained by calibrating a given system against hackground noise occurring during normal operating conditions.
Each detector-analyzer unit 10 may also include self-diagnostic means for periodically testing the response of the unit. The self-diagnostic means includes pulse generator 20, which is activated by a control signal from real time clock 32, to inject a test pulse of known characteristics into preamplifier 22 or filters 23. The parameters generated by measuring circuit 16, 17 and 18 are then compared by microprocessor 19 to a set of known test pulse parameters stored in storage means 30 of microprocessor 19. A malfunction warning is transmitted by communications means 12 to the central control unit 11 if such comparison reveals a malfunction of the particular detector-analyzer unit. Real time clock 32 may be programmed by a self-diagnost:ic subroutine to activate pulse generator 20 at regular intervals. The lengths of the intervals may be set for each detector-analyzer unit 10 hy central control unit 11.
Central control unit 11 preferably includes means for periodically receiving and storing the current data block (time, date, timing interval and current value of parameter) for one or more emission parameters from a particular 122486'7 detector-analyzer unit. This facility allows for feedback regarding background emissions occurring under normal operating conditions. Such means comprises a suhroutine which, in response to a suitable command from the control unit, causes the current data block as described above to be transmitted to the central control unit 11 via co~munications link 12.
In an alternative embodiment of the invention, there is provided signal processing means coupled to the detector, comprising an analogue-to-digital converter which provides a digitized output signal representative of the output signal of the detector. This signal is directed into the microprocessor, without first generating any emission parameters therefrom. Preferably, measuring circuits 16, 17 and 18 are replaced by a high speed analogue-to-digital (A to D) converter. The output of the A to D converter is then fed directly into data input means 31 of microprocessor 19. The data signal received by microprocessor 19 is therefore representative of the high frequency acoustic emission wave packet itself.
A set of emission parameters analogous to those generated by the measuring circuits may be generated by microprocessor 19 itself, by means of suitable applications software, capable of transforming the stored data signals into emission parameters such as total counts, count rate and r.m.s. voltage, by means of appropriate algorithms. The current values of the emission parameters may then be compared, in a manner similar to that of the preferred embodiment, with the base values for these parameters (which are stored in memory), to generate a warning signal, if any of the current values exceed their respective base values.
It will be recognized that this alternative embodiment may not possess all of the advantages of the preferred emhodiment of the invention, since the alternative embodiment does not address the problems associated with the digitization of high frequency data and the need for a microprocessor having an extremely large data storage capacity. The preferred emhodiment may also be advantageous over the alternative embodiment since the preferred embodiment may not require as much time to process a particular acoustic emission event. In the alternative embodiment, due to data storage limitations, the data representing a particular acoustic emission event usually has to be fully processed and analyzed before a signal representing another acoustic emission event can be stored.
Accordingly, such a system is usually only capable of receiving data during a fraction of the time that the system is on-line, due to limitations of currently available microprocessors.
While the present invention has been described and illustrated with respect to the preferred embodiment, those skilled in the art will understand that numerous variations of the preferred embodiment may be made without departing lZ24867 from the scope of the invention, which is define~ in the appended clai~s.

d~' 122AB67 ` APPENDIX A

**HI~L~NCE OF NON-~SK INT. SER~ICE SUE~FROUTINE**
PURPOSE: Used to e~ll the subrou-tir,es used in ~rithmetic ~r,~ lo~io~l rooessins of o~t~ined d~t~. I

0 1634 CrlE910 C~LL lOE9 1637 CD5813 C~LL 1358 163~ F5 F`USH ~F
163R 3~2738 LD ~,(3827) 1640 2005 JR NZ~05 1642 C115~16 C~LL 1698 1645 ~821 JR 21 1647 FEOl CF' 01 1649 2008 J~ NZ,08 -164r~ Crl9816 C~LL 1698 164E Crl2217`C~LL 1722 1653. FE02 CP 02 1655 2008 JR NZ~08 .1657 CD9816 C~LL 1698 . 165A Crl~917 CALL 17~9 - 165D 1809 JR 09 :
0 165F- Crl9816 C~LL 1698 1662 Crl2217 C~LL 1722 1665 Cl1~917 ChLL 17~9 0 1668 3~1~38 Lrl ~(381~) 166E~ FE05 CP 05 166D 2005 JR NZ~05 0 166F CrlO~19 C~LL 190A

1674 3~1r~38 Lrl ~(3~1r~) 1679 2005 JF; NZ~05 167r~ CrlDC19 C~LL l~rlC
167E 180~ JR 0~
1680 3QlC38 Ln ~7(381C) 1685 2003 JR NZ~03 1687 CD~El~ C~LL l~E
168~ CrlFCll C~LL llFC
168rl Crl~412 C~LL 1244 1690 Crlr~12 C~LL 12r~
1693 Crl9716 C~LL 16~7 1696 Fl F'OF' ~F

I

~22486~7 ~
.
, **SUBkOUTINE~*
FErlFOSE' Use,~ to detern,il-le wheth~r ~urrer,t Par~nleter(~ol~stic~ i5 less th~n or gre~ter ther, the corr~s~on~in~ ~se v~ e. This routine ~lso oh~nr,els ~ll out~ut d~t~ in one of five runnin~ lir,es.
(r.m.s. d~3tA onlY).

1698 cs PUSH BC
1699 bs F USH bE
169~ Es PUSH HL
sE~ Fs F USH ~F
16sc 0602 Lrl B ~ 02 169E 111138 Lrl rlE~3sll l6Q1 2llE3s Lrl HL9381E
16~4 ~7 ~ND
16~5 l~ Lrl Q! (nE~
16~6 sE SBC ~ (HL
l 6~7 27 rl~
16~8 lE~ bEC rlE
16~9 2r~ bEC HL
16~ l oFs bJNZ ! Fs 16QC 3037 Jr~ NC~ 37 16~E 211~38 Lb HL~3s 16B1 7E Lb ~! (HL~
16B2 FEOO cp oo 16r~4 2soF Jr~ Z~OF
16E6 3600 Lrl (HL) ~oo Bs 2l4F3s Lrl HL~3s4F
16E~E~ 3600 Lb (HL~ ~oo l6E~rl ll4E3s Lrl rlE~3s4E
16C0 014FOO Lb BC r 004F
16C3 ErlBs LrlrlF;~
16CS 11003~ Lrl rlE~3soo cs 210038 Lrl HL-3800 cr~ 010600 Lrl BC.0006 16CE Erlr~o LnIp rl0 EE~ EX bE ~ HL
rll 3600 Lrl (~IL )-OO
rl3 23 INC HL
rl4 3600 Lrt (HL) ~oo rl6 23 INC HL
rl7 3601 Ln (HL)-O
rls 23 INC HL
rl~ EE~ EX rlE9HL
rlE ~11038 Lrl ~L~3slo nE 010200 L b E~C!0002 L6El ErlE~o LrlIp 16E3 l 8-58 Jr~ 38 16Es 211 ~38 Lrl HL ~ 381 Es 7E L~ ( HL
Es FEOG cp oo 16EE 2G03 Jr; NZ~03 l6Erl 34 INC (HLi 16EE 18II J JF; 115 ~ F r r-F~

:1 61~ 8006 Jl:i N;~' ~06 .i3~ ~ 61:: 4 3 ~ :[ N C~ H L . j ~224867 _~
16FC-l .t:L1039 1...l~ F.Y3~10 16F8 18CI J~ CE
16FA F-E02 CF' 0'~
16FC` ~006 JF~ NZ~06 16FE 34 INC (HL) 16FF 11~039 Lrl CIEY392Q
1702 18C4 JF~ C4 1704 FE03 CF' 03 t706 2006 JF~ NZrO6 170S 34 INC tHL~
170S 113039 Lrl rlE~3930 170C 18E~ JR E~A
170E FE04 CF' 04 1710 ~006 JR NZ~06 171~ 34 INC (HL~
1713 114039 Ln rlE~3q40 171~ 18r~0 JF~ r~o 1718 3600 Lrl (HL)~OO
171A 34 INC ~HL) 171E' 189E~ JF~ 9E~
171rl Fl POP QF
171E El POP HL
171F rll POP rlE
1720 Cl POP ~C

:

, 'i`' ~ ' ~' . .. , , ~1 l ~ .
I

1;~24867 `
**SUEtROU T I NE ~
F UkF OSE: Used to dete rn, i r,e whe the r cu rrent ~ r~3n,e te r ( ~eou5t i C ) i S
, ~ or ` then its c~rres~or,dir,g t~3se v~3lue. T~lis routir,e ~lso ch~nnels ~11 d~t~ in or~e ~f five lines.
(ooI~r~t r~te d~t~ or,l~).

:L 72:~ C5 F USH ~C
1723 rl5 F USH rlE

17_5 F5 PUSH AF
1;7~6 0603 L.rl B.03 6~ 1728 111438 I rl rlE~3~1q 17~rt ~l~C38 LrI HL~38_C
17?E A7 ANrl A
172F lA Lrl A. (rlE) 1730 9E SRC ~, (HL) 1731 27 rlAA
1732 lB IIEC rlE
1733 ?Et rlEC HL
1734 1 OF9 rlJNZ ~ F5' 1736 3034 JR NC,34 1738 211rt38 LrI ~IL,381rt 173Et 7E L rl A, (HL) 173E 280F JFi Z, OF
1740 3600 L~I ( HL ) ~ 00 1742 219F39 Lrl HL.399F
1745 3600 Lrl (HL) ~00 1747 119E39 LD rlE,39r~E
174~ 014FOO Lrl EtCY 004F
1 74rl Er~rts LnrlR
174F 11503r~ LrI rIE93950 175~ 210038 LrI ~Ls3800 1755 010600 LrI ~C,0006 1758 Erlr~O LrIIF;
~ 175A 21A012 Lrl HL ~ 12A() 175rl 010300 Ln E~C~0003 1760 ErI~O LrlIR
176' ~:'11238 Lrl HL~3812 1765 010300 LrI rtCsO003 1768 ErlrtO LrlIR
~19 176A 1838 JR 38 176C ~llrt~3 LrI I~L~38lrt 176F 7E Lrl A, (HL) 1772 2003 JF~ NZ 03 1774 34 INC (HL) 177, l8rl~3 JF~ rl8 1777 FEOl t`F 01 1779 '006 IR N7 .7 06 177E; 34 I NC ( I il.
177 C ~ I r 1,'71:: .L ~r~ r~
'i :1781 F E O 2 C F:' ~ ) 12Z486~ ;
1783 ~?006 J~ . ' NZ ~ 0 l785 34 INC ~ HL ) 17~36 117039 Lrl IIE ~ 3570 1789 18C7 JF; C7 178rt FE03 CF' 03 178rl 2006 JF; NZ .06 178F 34 INC (HL) 1790 118039 Lrl rlE .3980 @~ 17~3 18rtn Jfi~
1795 FE04 CF' 04 1797 2006 Jfi NZ .06 ~i 1799 34 INC (HL) 179A 11 gO35~ Lri IlE ~ 39gO
179rl 18rt3 Jfi~ r~3 179F 3600 Lri (HL)-OO
~i 17A1 34 INC (HL) 17A2 189E Jfi' 9E
17~4 F1 POF' ~F
17A5 E1 F'OF' HL
17A6 rl1 F'OP rlE
17A7 C1 POF' E)C
17A8 C9 F;ET
~ .*

~' i :
! ~
.-., . ~19 ' .
!

. ~ ' ' .

~q ~224~i7 - ! -~*SU~I~`OU'rl~E~
FURFJSE' Used to detern,ine whe-th~r currer,t ~r~meter(~coustic) i5 or therl its corresPor,dirl~ ~ase v~lue. This routine ~lso ch~r,r,els ~11 outPut d~t~ in or,e of five rlJr,r,ir,~ lir,es.
(total colJnt d~t~ or,lY).

17AA D5 F'USH DE

17~n 0605 Lrl R~OS ~
17AF 111938 LD DE~ 3819 ~13438 Lr~ HL,383~ J
17Et5 A7 ~ND
17R6 lA LD ~7 (rlE) 17R7 9E SRC A~(HL) 17R9 lr~ rlEC rlE

17E~rt lOF9 DJNZ.F9 17Brl 3034 JR NCr34 17BF 211C38 LD HL,381C .:
17C2 7E Ln A~(HL) L7C3 FEOO CF' 00 17C5 280F JR Z~OF
17C7 3600 LD (HL)~OO
17C9 21EF39 LD HL,39EF
17CC 3600 LD (HL)~OO
17CE llEE39 LD IIE,39EE
17D1 014FOO L.rl EtC~004F
l7rl4 Erlr~s LrlrlF~
17rl6 llA039 Lrl rlE~39~0 17rl9 ~10038 Lrl HL~3800 17rlC OlQ600 Lrl RCY0006 rlF Erlr~o Lrl~:F~' 17E1 21R71~ LD HL.,12R7 17E9 211538 LD HL.,3815 17EC 010500 LD RC,0005 17F1 1838 JF~' 38 17F3 211C38 Lrl HL~381C
17F6 7E LD A~(HL) '' 17F7 FEOO CF' 00 17F9 2003 JR NZ~03 17FR 34 INC (HL) 17FC 18rl8 JF~ rl8 17FE FEOl CF' 01 1800 2006 JP NZ,06 L802 34 INC (t-tL) 1803 llB039 LD DEr3~rtO
:L~06 l~r~:L ~Jri rll :l ~;18 F: i: Q.`` C r V'~
1 8 ~i t~. ~ 0 0 6 J fi '~1 E' Y (! ~; 12Z486 _, 18QC 3~ INC` tllL) `or, llCt)39 L 1:1 r~E,3'~CO
1810 18C7 JF; C7 1812 FE03 CF' 03 1814 20V6 Jfi` NZ .06 1816 34 INC (HL) l ~ i.7 l lnQ3~ Lrl rlE ~ ~YrlO
181~ 18r~rl JF~
181C FE04 CF' 04 181E 2006 Jfi NZY06 1820 34 INC` tHL ) 1821 l l E039 Lrl EIE .39EO
1824 18~3 Jk r~3 1826 3600 Lll ~HL~ ,00 1828 34 INC (HL~
1829 18~E Jfi~ YE
182E~ F L POF ~F
1~2C El POF HL
18~'11 111 FOP rlE
182E Cl POP E~C
182F C9 kET
*

Classifications
International ClassificationG01N29/14, G01H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01N29/14, G01H1/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
7 Dec 2004MKEXExpiry