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Publication numberCA1086704 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberCA 326697
Publication date30 Sep 1980
Filing date1 May 1979
Priority date3 May 1978
Also published asCA1086704A1, DE2916918A1, US4195632
Publication numberCA 1086704 A, CA 1086704A, CA 326697, CA-A-1086704, CA1086704 A, CA1086704A
InventorsWendell R. Parker, Willis L. Warner, Mark H. Silverman
ApplicantWendell R. Parker, Cutter Laboratories, Inc., Willis L. Warner, Mark H. Silverman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: CIPO, Espacenet
Fluid flow valve
CA 1086704 A
Abstract
ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE
An improvement in a fluid flow valve is disclosed. The valve com-prises a combination of flexible tubing joined to a tubular member having a membrane closing off the passageway in the tubular member. A pointed spike having at least three radially projecting ribs extending longitudinally is located within the tubing adjacent the membrane and is moveable by external manipulation of the tubing whereby the spike ruptures the membrane and creates a passageway permitting fluid to flow freely through the tubular member and adjoining tubing.
Claims(10)
THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. In a system for handling fluids which includes at least one contain-er in communication with flexible tubing, a fluid flow valve system which com-prises a pierceable membrane lying transversely in the flow path of the tubing and adapted to prevent fluid flow therethrough; a spike member having a point-ed end and positioned within a portion of the tubing adjacent the membrane, the spike member being unattached and capable of movement within the tubing and comprising a longitudinal body having at least three radially projecting ribs extending longitudinally substantially the full length of the body and converging towards the pointed end; the spike member being adapted for ruptur-ing the membrane by external manipulation of the tubing so as to create a passageway for flow of fluid in the space between any two adjacent ribs and the ruptured membrane.
2. The valve system of claim 1, wherein the spike member has four ribs spaced generally equidistant from each other.
3. In a fluid transfer system which comprises flexible tubing communi-cating with the interior of at least one container, a fluid flow valve system which comprises a tubular member having one end in communication with the interior of said one container and its other end joined to the tubing; a pierceable membrane lying transversely in the tubular member and adapted to prevent fluid flow therethrough; a spike member having a pointed end and located within a portion of the tubing adjacent the membrane, the spike member being unattached and capable of movement within the tubing and comprising a longitudinal body having at least three radially projecting ribs extending longitudinally substantially the full length of the body and converging towards the pointed end; the tubular member having a rigidity sufficient to prevent the spike member from being further manipulated after it has been externally manipulated through the tubing to rupture the membrane and moved to a position within the tubular member; the spike member creating a passageway for flow of fluid in the space between any two adjacent ribs and the ruptured membrane.
4. The valve of claim 3, wherein the spike has four ribs spaced sub-stantially equally from each other.
5. The valve of claim 3, wherein the membrane is located intermediate the two ends of the tubular member.
6. The valve of claim 3, wherein the membrane is integral with the tubular member.
7. The valve of claim 3, wherein the membrane is integral with the tubing.
8. The valve of claim 3, wherein said one end of the tubular member is secured directly to a wall portion of said one container.
9. The valve of claim 3, wherein said one end of the tubular member is spaced from said one container by a length of interconnecting tubing.
10. The valve of claim 4, wherein one pair of opposing ribs converge to meet at the pointed end and the other pair of opposing ribs converge at a spot on the axis of the spike rearward of the pointed end.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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This invention relates to a ~luid ~low valve, and in particular to one which is intended for use with flexible blood bags and the like, but which also can used as a means for initiating flow of fluid in any con-duit system closed by a membrane.
Blood bag ~ystems employing two or more flexible bags interconnec-ted by lengths of flexible tubing are currently in use for separating whole blood into plasma, red cells, platelets and the like in a sterile manner.
Frequently, it is necessary to prevent the contents of one bag from Elowing through inter-connecting tubing into another bag during manipulative steps such as when blood is drawn from a donor into a bag and then centrifuged to separate red cells from the plasma. Externally located valves or clamps may become dislodged or may damage the tubing.
Several internally located valve devices have been developed which are all characterized by having a transverse membrane in the tubing which can be ruptured by a hollow cannula situated within the tubing. The membrane assures there will be no fluid flow from one bag to another until such time the cannula is manipulated to rupture the membrane. For example, United States Patent 3,685,795, G. Caster, August 22, 1972, shows a pointed cannula fixed at one end to the tubing and encased in a sleeve which is secured to a section of tubing containing a membrane. Such a valve device is quite complex in structure and expensive to mamlfacture. A much simpler valve is disclosed in United States Patent 3,110,308, D. Bellamy, November 12, 1963.
It consists of a pointed hollow unattached cannula in the tubing membrane located adjacent the pointed end of the ~annula.
By compressing the tubing adjacent the cannula, the cannula can be moved so as to penetrate the membrane and initiate flow of fluid through the tubing. Some cannulas are diEEicult to move because oE excessive drag gener-ated between walls of the tubing and the cannula. Smaller cannulas can be .~ ' ~

, . . ~ . . . ., . . . ~

~0867~4 moved mQre readll~ but the~ limit the ~lo~ o~ flui~d and they also run the ri`sk o~ ruptur~ng the bag ~all i~ they ~r~ moved too ar.
~ e have de~ised a fluid ~lo~ ~alve which is not only inexpensive to manufacture and easily manipulated but also in some preferred embodiments a~oids the passibility of rupturing of a container wall. The fluid flow valve of the present invention comprises flexible tubing in a fluid transfer system having at least one container in communication with the tubing, a piercŤable membrane in the flow path of the tubing, and a unique spike member lying ~ithin the tubing adjacent the membr~ne. The spike member comprises a longitudinal body having at least three radially projecting ribs which ex-tend longitudinally along the body and converge towards a pointed end. The spike has a particular advantage over tubular cannulas in that, when the spike is moved, only the outside edges of the ribs come into contact with the interior wall surfaces of the tubing and any frictional drag effect is much less than that for a tubular cannula o the same diameter thus allo~ing for easier manipulation of the spike, Consequently, spikes having diameters significantly greater than tubular cannulas but having no greater drag can be used whereby greater fluid flo~ can be effected following rupture of the membrane by the spike. Another advantage the spike member has over a tubular

2~ cannula is that the pointed end i5 substantially centrally located and this facilitates rupturing of the membrane.
A preferred form of the fluid flow valve of this inventi.on, particu-larly ~hen used in a fluid transfer system employing plastic bags, further includes a tubular member interposed between the bag and the flexible tubing.
The pierceable membrane lies adjacent the juncture between the tubular member and the tubing~ The tubular member has; a rigidity such that ~hen the spike member is manipulated threugh the tubing to punckure the membrane and becomes positioned ~ithin the tubular member, the tubular mcmber cannot be manipulated , ., .: , . . , . ... . - :: . : . : , .. - ,, ~il67 014 so as to move the spike member beyond the tubular member. Rupturing of the bag by the spike is thus preven-ted.
In accordance with one aspect of this invention, there is provided in a system for handling fluids which includes at least one con-tainer in communication with flexible tubing, a fluid flow valve system which comprises a pierceable membrane lying transversely in the flow path of the tubing and adapted to prevent ~luid flow therethrough; a spike member having a pointed end and positioned within a portion of the tubing adjacent the membrane, -the spike member being unattached and capable of movement within the tubing and comprising a longitudinal body having at least three radially projecting ribs extending longitudinally subs-tantially the full length of the body and con-verging towards the pointed end; the spike member being adapted for rupturing the membrane by external manipulation of the tubing so as to create a passage-way for flow of fluid in the space between any two adjacent ribs and the ruptured membrane.
In accordance wi-th another aspect of this inven-tion, there is provided in a fluid transfer system which comprises flexible tubing communi-~ cating with the interior of at least one container, a fluid flow valve system ; which comprises a tubular member having one end in communication with the interior Or said one container and its other end joined to -the tubing; a pierceable membrane~lying transversely in the tubular member and adap-ted to prevent fluid flo~ therethrough, a spike member having a pointed end and loca-ted ~ithin a portion of-the tubing adjacent the membrane, the spike mem-ber being unattached and capable of movement wi-thin the -tubing and comprising a lon~itudinal body having at least three radially projecting ribs ex-tending longitudinally substantially the full length of the bod~ and converging towards the pointed end; the tubular member having a rigidi-ty sufficient to .
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~8670~
prevent the spike member from being further manipulated after i~ has been externally manipulated through -the tubing to rupture the membrane and moved to a position within the tubular memberj the spike member creating a passage-way for flow of fluid in the space between any two adjacent ribs and the ruptured membrane.
~he invention can be better understoo~ and the advantages will be-come apparent from the following description of some preferred embodiments and as illustrated in the attached drawings, wherein:
Figure 1 illustrates a multi-bag blood processing system containing a fluid flow valve of the present invention;
Figure 2 is a side view in cross-section of a preferred embodiment of the fluid flow valve of this invention;
Figure 3 is a side view in cross-section of another embodimen-t of -the rluid flow valve of this invention; :
Figure 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 o~ Figure 2;
Figure 5 is an end view of another form of the spike member of the fluid flow valve;
Figure 6 is representa-tive of an alternate form of a spike member;
and Figura 7 is a sectional view of a portion of still another form of -~he ~luid flow valve.
Referring to the drawing, Figure 1 illus-trates a multiple bag sys-tem 10 which comprises a blood collection bag 12 and a blood componen-t receiving bag 1ll connected by flexible tubing 16. Bag 12 is -typically ~joined to a donor~aadla as~o~bly lo by tubing 20. Each bag 12 or 1~ may hare one or more ports 22 ~or access to the contents a~ter collec-tion and processing.
~he fluid ~low valve 30 of this invention, which controls the flow ' - 3a -. . : , . .. : ., . , . .. .. . ., .. : .. .. . . .. ., .. , .. , . - . , . . , : .

'. " ' ' :: . ...................... .. -. ' : . , . . : . .: . . . . . . . .

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of fluid between bags 12 and 14, is bes-t illustrated in Figures 2 and 4.
Valve 30 comprises a-tubular member 32 with a pierceable transverse membrane 34 intermediate the ends 36 and 38. Flexible tubing 16 is sealingly connected to end 36 and end 38 is sealed to and in communication with bag 12.

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~86 7D~

A spike me~ber 40 is ~ositioned ~i~hin tubing 16 and has a pointed end 42 ~acing ~e~brane 34 Q~ tu~ular me~er 32.
T~e spike mem~er 40 as sh~wn in F~GUR~S 2-4 comprises four ribs 44 radiating from a common axis and tapering to the pointed end 42. ~he spike member can ha~e three ribs generally equally spaced as shown in FIGURE

3 or it can have ~ive or more ribs. A s~lke with four ribs is preferred.
The spike member can be made of any material which allows it to be manipula-ted externally through the tubing 16 to rupture membrane 34. Preferably the length of the spike member is substantially no greater than the length of tubular member 32 so that its pointed end ~2 does not extend into the bag 12 when the end 46 is in line with end 36 of the tub~lar member, thus avoiding possible rupture of the ~ag wall. ~he spike member can have other features such as that shown in FIGURE 6. Here two opposing ribs 44 converge at the pointed end 42 and the other two opposing ribs 44a taper to the axis at a spot rearwardly of the pointed end.
The spike member is made preferably as wide as possible without creating so tigh~ a fit within tubing 16 that it cannot be readily manipula-ted for movement through membrane 34. In some instances, the spike can be coated with an inert lubricant such as silicone oil to facilitate its move-ment ~ithin the tubing. Following external manipulation of tubing 16 to force the Spike through membrane 34, edges of the ruptured membrane exert pressure against the ribs of the spike and help to prevent its progression into the bag.
~ubular member 32 preferably is nlade of the same material as that of the tubing 16 and bag 12 so that heat or solvent bonding to the bag and tubing can be more readil~ effected. The walls of the tubular member 32 are generall~ somewhat thicker than the ~all ~ tubing 16 which imparts sufficient rigidit~ to the mem~er such that spike 40, once it has been forced within the ~ ' ` ' . ,.

- 4 -:' .. ,.. , . .... ,, ~, ... ... , j. . . . .

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~6~8~d04 confines of tubular member 32, cannot be externally manipulated further and thus prevents the spike of any significant part of the pointed end from enter-ing bag 12. The tubular member 32 as shown in FIGURE 2 has an annular ledge 48 near end 36 which aids the user in get~ing a firmer grasp of the member while the spike is being manipulated through tubing 16. The presence of ledge 48 is not critical, however, to the function provided by the tubular member.
Another embodiment of the fluid flow valve of this inven~ion is illustrated in FIGURE 3. Here the tubular member 32a communicates with bag 12a by being sealed to a relatively short piece of tubing 50 whose inner end 52 is sealed between t~o sealed sheets comprising bag 12a.
Although tubing 16 is shown in FIGURES 2 and 3 as being sealed within tubular members 32 or 32a, alternatively tubing 16 can be made to fit over and enclose the ends 36 or 36a of the tubular members.
A further embodiment 60 of the fluid flow valve is sho~n in FIGURE
7. Here the pierceable membrane 62 is integrally a part of tubing 16a.
As an example of how the fluid flow valve of this invention may be used, following venipuncture with the needle of needle assembly 18, blood is drawn from a donor into bag 12~ tubin~ 20 is sealed off near the bag and the entire system 10 is centrifuged allowing separation o the plasma from the red hlood cells. Spike 40 is externally manipulated as for example, by com-pressing tubing 16 adjacent the blunt end 46 which forces spike 40 through membrane 34, causing the ruptured membrane to spread, thus creating a passage-way between each of two adjacent ribs 44. The plasma is then expressed from ~ag 12 through tubing 16 into bag I4 where it may be stored for further processing~
Although several examples o~ the ~luid flow valve of the present invention have been disclosed, these should be construed as illustrative only . - - . - . . - -,- ~ . . - . . ,. :

1E;7~9~
and the scope of the invention is intended to ~e llmited only by the follow-ing claims.

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Classifications
International ClassificationA61M5/14, A61M39/14, B67B7/48, F16K17/40, A61J1/05, A61J1/10, A61M39/22
Cooperative ClassificationY10S604/905, Y10T137/1767, A61M39/221, A61J1/10, A61J1/1475, A61M39/14, A61M5/14
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
30 Sep 1997MKEXExpiry