Rudolph Technologies Inc news

   Watch this stock
Showing stories 1 - 10 of about 17   

Articles published

RTEC 14.18 0.00 (0.00%)
price chart
A New Measure of Development: Well-being
What's the best measure of progress in the global economy? Even economists aren't satisfied with gross domestic product and incomes anymore.
Peaking into lunar craters
Large impacts are fascinating. There's the thriller-movie aspect of them, of course, spiced with enough reality to make them legitimately scary.
Join the Citizen Science brigade
They're right. But then, anyone who does science is a scientist. You can do science. So, you wanna be a scientist? For a while now, more and more regular ol' people have been participating in science.
Saturn eclipses an icy moon
The mighty planet Saturn is circled by a fleet of moons, each as different from the other as individual people. And as weird and alien as it seems, this Saturnian system of planet and moons have some similarities to our own Earth and Moon.
Alzheimer's Setback Makes Elan Takeover Bait to Biogen
The combined company, which makes a narcolepsy drug, is known as Jazz Pharmaceuticals Plc. Alkermes Plc, which makes an addiction therapy, bought Elan's drug technologies unit and moved its headquarters to Dublin from Waltham, Massachusetts. Davis ...
Newborn star makes a cosmic bank shot
Like human babies, newborn stars tend to blast out gas from both ends. Unlike infant people, when stars do it it's because of things like angular momentum, magnetic fields, and radiation pressure.
Shimmering purple aurora after a powerful solar storm
While I was at Comic Con - these things always seem to happen when I can't get to the blog! - the huge sunspot cluster AR 1520 let loose with a powerful X1.4 class flare [Note: I originally had this as an X4 flare].
The Sun speaks up
It's been a while since we've had a big flare from the Sun. Active region 1515 was looking like it might do the trick - over the past week this group of sunspots has been hissing and spitting, but the flares have been relative small.
NuSTAR opens its X-ray eye
Sorry I didn't post this when it happened, but some good news: In late June, NASA's NuSTAR X-ray observatory saw first light!
High schoolers totally shred on a high-altitude balloon
I've written about high-altitude balloon science before: small weather balloons can carry scientific payloads up to heights of 30 kilometers or more, where they can detect cosmic phenomena normally blocked by the Earth's atmosphere.