Non-state actors and human rights

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Oxford University Press, 2005 - Business & Economics - 387 pages
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Can transnational corporations ignore human rights as long as governments don't hold them accountable? If the UN is put in charge of a territory, is it bound by human rights law? Under traditional approaches to human rights, non-state actors cannot be parties to the relevant treaties and so they are only bound to the extent that obligations accepted by States can be applied to them by governments. This situation threatens to make a mockery of much of the international system of accountability for human rights violations. The contributors to this volume examine the different approaches that might be taken in order to ensure some degree of accountability. Making space in the legal regime to take account of the role of non-State actors is one of the biggest and most critical challenges facing international law today.

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Contents

Notes on Contributors
51
Accommodate NonState Actors?
3
The Changing International Legal
25
Copyright

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About the author (2005)


Philip Alston is Professor of Law at New York University Law School.

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